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NICHOLAS 

VOLUME XLVIII 

PART II 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/stnicholasserial4821dodg 



ST. NICHOLAS 

AN 

Illustrated Magazine 



For Boys and Girls 



VOLUME XLVIII 

Part II. May to October, 1921 



THE CENTURY CO., NEW YORK 



Copyright, 1921, by The Centuky 



Contents of Part II. Volume XLVIII 



/Esop's Fables. Retold in Verse. (Illustrated by Oliver 

Herford.) Ohver Herford 

Air Fleet, The Flawless. Verse. (Illustrated.) Minnie Leona Upton. 



600 
894 



Airplane Patrol, The. Sketch. (Illustrations from photo- 

graphs.) ^""^ £ - ?«>*Zard ^71 

Apple Blossoms. Verse Don C. Setts 

Aviators— New Makers of War Maps. . Sketch, (lllustra- 

turns from photographs..) , ^mes Anderson 

Aviator's Tribute, The. See "Fancy Free." 

Bamboo Mountain, On the. Sketch. (Illustrated by W. M. 

R „^„„ r \ ATtwa Sutherland Furdy.. 

Barber Who Became a Knight, The. Sketch Mary R. Parkman 006 

Binkie and Bing. Story. (Illustrated by G. Frances Andre) .Eleanore Myers Jewett... 100/ 

Bird Migration. See "High Sky." 

Black Leopard of Sumatra, A. Story. (Illustrated by John 

S Curry ) Warren H. Muter vi» 

Black Sheep's Coat, The. Story. (Illustrated by Henry C. 

pj tz ^ Cornelia Meigs ™ 

Blue Byke^ The. Story. (Illustrated by Douglas Ryan.) .. .David Q. Hammond 714 

Borrowers, The. See ''MacDonald Grit, The.". 



DO y eh,;™ ^^::r... «o 

ii ' 780 

Burroughs, John. See "John o' Birds." 

Campers, Hints for. Sketch, with diagrams 5. Leonard Bastin 733 

Camp Roosevelt. Sketch. (Illustrations from photographs.) .Lillian Ewertsen 840 

"Captain Kid." Verse. (Illustrated by Reginald Birch.) .. ..Robert Emmet Ward 1032 

Catbirds, A Camera Adventure with. Sketch. (lllustra- 

tions from photographs.) Howard Taylor Middleton 593 

Caught in the Act. Story. (Illustrated by W. M. Berger.) .Henry Ross 579 

Cheating the River. Story. (Illustrated by Edwin John 

p r i tt i e .) Charles A. Hoyt 89b 

Clock, The Fable of the. Verse. (Illustrated by Reginald 

B j rch ) Florence Boyce Davis 1061 

Clothes Verse. (Illustrated by Decie Merwin.) Jane Brown 732 

Collections Hildegarde Hawthorne... 1012 

Comical State o' Things, A. Verse Ruth Plumly Thompson.. 929 

Corn-Field, The. Verse. (Illustrated.) Daisy M. Moore 1067 

Crow, The. See "Sky Pirate, The" 963 

Dante. See " 'Divine Poet' of Florence, The." 

Democracy. Verse. (Illustrated by Albertine Randall 

Wheelan.) L^bel L. Whitney 592 

Denewood. See "Luck of Denewood, The." 

"Divine Poet" of Florence, The. Sketch. (Illustrations from 

photographs.) Klyda Richardson Steege 969 

Dragon's Secret, The. Serial Story. (Illustrated by C. M. 

Relyea.) Augusta Hmell Seaman, 64Z, mo 

Eagle and the Tortoise, The. (Illustrated by the author.) ..C. J. Budd 1031 

Enterprising Enterprise, The. Story. (Illustrated by Har- 

old Sichel.) R- Ray Baker 1096 

Faery Magic. Verse. (Illustrated by the author.) Henry C. Pits 681 

Flag, The Making of the. See "Plays." 

Football Generalship. Sketch Sol Metzger 1101 

Freedom, On. Verse. Virginia Woods Mackall. 828 



Garden, A Spell to Keep the. Verse. (Decoration by Anne 

Memam Peck.) Hden Coa , e Qrew m 

Golf (Illustrated by C. M. Relyea.) Francis Ommet, 

Keeping tit tor Golt ' ^2 

(jolt arid Youth — Good Team-mates . . u l4 

Until the Last Putt Is Holed '//.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.['.[['.'..'.'.'. 974 

Goodly Heritage, A. Verse Mildred 'w'ass'on. 815 

Haunted Swamp, The True Story of the. (Illustrated by 

Harold Sichel.) t i\r j , .; "- „->„ 

TT . „, ' i- Morns Longstreth 878 

Hedgehog, A Tame. See "Snuffer." 

Heirlooms, A Glimpse at Our Country's. Sketch. (Illus- 

„„ trat ^ d - ) • Wilbur Gass..., 827 

Here Beginneth the First Lesson." Verse. (Illustration 

by Georg Stoopendaal.) Bert0n Bm[ey m 

High Sky. Sketch. (Illustrated by Chanes Livingston tiu\l)Samuel Scoville, Jr 1062 

"Inspiring Genius." Verse Florence Boyce Davis ... . 922 

Inverse Time-Limit Relay, The. Story. (Illustrated by 

Edwin John Prittie.) Charles A. Hoyt 987 

"Isn't a June Wedding Just Lovely?" Picture. Drawn by 

R. B. Kirby 

69;> 

Jack the Kill-O-Watter. Story. (Illustrated by Herbert R 

Nor ton.) Charles A Royt 596 

John o Birds. Sketch. (Illustration from photograph.) Mabel Ansley Murphy... 780 

Kit, Pat, and a Few Boys. Serial Story. (Illustrated by C 

M - Rel y ea -) Beth B. Gilchrist 603 



Knights of the Wild-Fire, The. Story. (Illustrated by ^ ? "' %6 ' 9& °' 1089 

Arthur Henderson.) Mary Constance DuBois _ m 

Korea, A Trip to. Sketch. (Illustrations from photographs.) .Charles Burnett 926 

Land Call, The. Verse. (Illustrated by the author.) Edith Ballinger Price .. . 743 

Land of Tot, The. Verse Ralph Henry Barbour ... . 917 

Little Things, The Fun— and the Immensity— of Hildegarde Hawthorne 1059 

Louis Philippe. See "Caught in the Act." 

Luck of Denewood, The. Serial Story. (Illustrated by 

Emilie Benson Knipe.) r Alden Arthur Knipe , 

\Emilie Benson Knipe j 

MacDonald Grit, The, or The Borrowers. Story (Illus- ?36 ' ^ 93 °' 1021 ' 1121 

trated by Edward C. Caswell.) A. May Holaday 690 

Manufactured Motives. Story. (Illustrated by Victor 

Perard -) Louise W. Bray 586 

Mary Lou's Medal. Story Margaret E. Curtis 682 

Merry Rain, The. Verse. (Illustrated by Decie Merwin.) . . Josie Eppert 703 

Mightiest Eagle, The. Story. (Illustrated by Phillips 

Ward ') /. Horace Lytic 792 

Musician, The. Verse. (Illustrated by Anne Merriam 

Peck -) Faith Van V. Vilas 986 

Nerve in the Pinch. Sketch. (Illustrations from photo, 

graphs.) William T. Tilden, 2nd... 788 

JNew Yorks Executive Mansion, The Biggest Family in 

Sketch. (Illustration from photograph.) Harold McCoy 744 

"No-Hit" Game, The. Story. (Illustrated by Victor Perard.)./. Raymond Elderdice . ... 897 

Paper Houses? Why Not. Sketch. (Illustrations from 

photographs.) charles K TayJor g37 

Pathfinders, The." Picture. Drawn by Arthur T. Merrick. 973 

Penelope's Ship. Ballad. ( Illustrated by W. M. Berger.) . . .Florence Boyce Davis. '. ' ' 776 

Perhaps They Are. Verse. (Illustrated by Reginald Birch. ).Arthur Guiterman 1033 

Peter to the Rescue. Story. (Illustrated by J. O'Neill.) . . . .Archibald Rutledge . 636 



|>et Shows of the West, The. Sketch. (Illustrations from 

photographs and from drawing by E. Nelson.) Stella George Stem I erry 1014 

Phantom Gold. Serial Story. (Illustrated by George Varian.) .K enneth Payson Kempton ^68 

Pig Under a Gate, A. Story. (Illustrated by J. M. Foster.) .Frank Farrington 1000 

Pinch-Hitter, The. Story. (Illustrated by C. M. Relyea.) . .Ralph Henry Barbour. ... 580 
Pirates of the Black Sea. Story. (Illustration from photo- 

g ra ph ) Mary Lena Wilson oiu 

Place Names", Some Interesting. Sketch Pauline Barr 1082 

Poet of Many Inventions, The Story of the. Sketch Mary R. Parkman 1111 

Poppies Doffed Their Coats, When the. Verse. r . Florence Boyce Davis. ... 937 

Preserves. Story. (Illustrated by H. MacGitvary.) Adeline K. MacGihary.. . 621 



Reaper, The Conquest of the. Sketch. (Illustrations from g9Q 

photographs.; J m7Q 

Riding the Guy. Story. (Illustrated by Edwin John Prittie.) .Charles A. Hoyt 10/8 



Rogue's Bargains, The. A Hindu Story W. Norman Brown 649 

Romance. Verse Cornelia Meigs 1057 

Roses. A Quadruple Acrostic. Verse James Rowe tt» 

Royal Hunt, The. Verse. (Illustrated by the author.) Charles F. Lester 11^8 

Sailing of Sir Bobstay, The. Verse. (Illustrated by the 

author.) Charles F. Lester 924 

Sailor's Child, The. Verse. (Illustrated by I. W. Taber.) . .Grace Clementine Howes. 978 
Sir Whackitt's Final Round. Verse. (Illustrated by the 

author.) Charlcs Lcstcr 616 

Sky Pirate, The. Sketch. (Illustrated by Charles Livingston 

g u jj ^ Samuel bcomlle, Jr ovj 

Sly Fox Caught the Jaguar, How the. Story. (Illustrated 1170 
by Ellsworth Young.) Ellen C. Babbitt 1120 

Small but Game. Story. (Illustrated by C. M. Relyea.) Mane Dancy 876 

"Snuffer." Sketch. (Illustrations from photographs.) 7. Alien Lormg 

Song-Peddler, The. Verse. (Illustrated by the author.) ... .Henry C. Pits 

Southern Waters. Verse. (Illustrated by Henry C. Pitz.) ..Bcrnice L. Kenyan ... 

Sportsmanship in Tennis. Sketch. (Illustrations from pho- 

tographs.) William T. Tilden, 2nd.. 675 

Squirrel-Folk. Sketch. (Illustrated by George A. King and 

'from photographs.) Samuel Scomlle, Jr 

Star How to Make a Five-Pointed. Sketch, with diagrams 

Summer Gown, A. Verse Blanche Elizabeth Wade 

Tennis. (Illustrations from photographs.) William T. Tildcn, 2nd. 

Sportsmanship in Tennis , 

Nerve in the Pinch 

Thanksgiving. See "Goodly Heritage, A." 

Thistle Elf, The. Verse. (Illustrated by the author.) Edith Ballmger Price. . 



910 
867 



782 
731 
705 



675 
788 

1028 



Unromantic Sea-Chest, The. Story. (Illustrated by Ruth ^ 

Hallock ) Dorothea Castelhun 884 

Until the Last Putt Is Holed. Sketch. (Illustrated by C. . 

M. Relyea.) Francis 0mmet 9 ^ 

"Using His Head." Pictures. Drawn by E. W. Kemble 649 



Who Will Go A-Gipsying? Verse. (Illustrated by Henry 

q pjtz.) Edith D. Osborne ... 

Winner of the Blue, The. Story (Illustrated by Edward 

C. Caswell.) Brewer Corcoran 

Win or Lose! Story. (Illustrated by Victor Perard.) Bayard Daniel York 

Wishing. Verse Eleanore Myers Jewett. 

Yang-tse-Kiang, On the. Verse. (Illustrated by Harold 

Sichel.) fieri on Braley 



705 

1113 
1068 
1120 



912 



DEPARTMENTS 

Nature and Science for Young Folk. (Illustrated) 655, 750, 847, 943, 1039, 1135 

The Automatic Pilot A _ Russell Bond 

The "Talking Thread" A _ Russdl Bond 

The Stars in May [sabel M Lewk 

Rolling Over a Capsized Battle-ship 4. R usse ll Bond 

Constellations for June Isabd M Lewis 

Propelling a Boat with Pumps A. Russell Bond 

The Bohemian Wax wings R Bruce H or s jail. Jr. 

Electric Power "Banks" A . RusseU Botld 

Fair- Weather Signals Dorothy Arno Baldzvin 

The Wireless Preacher A . Russell Bond 

Constellations for July [ sabc i M Le ^ s 

A Bumblebee in a Spider's Cave R. Bruce Horsfall, Jr. 

Crewless Railroad Train A. Russell Bond 

Constellations for August I sabe i M. Lewis 

A Toad's Drink George A. King 

A Bucket That Did Not Splash A. Russell Bond 

Henequen, or Sisal Hemp L. de J. Osborne 

The Stars in September l sa bel M. Lewis 

The Diary of an Elevator Cable A. Russell Bond 

Some Puzzling Tracks /. Smeaton Chase 

Constellations for October Isabel 71/. Lewis 

The Watch Tower. A Review of Current Events. (Illus- 
trated.) Edward N. Tcall 650 

it 17 t- ^, ^- 745 > 842 - 938 - 1034. 1130 

boR Very Little Folk. The Tiptoe Twins. Pictures drawn 

by Isabel Morton Fish 66 0, 75 6 , 852, 948, 1044, 1140 

The St. Nicholas League. With Awards of Frizes for 

Stories, Poems, Drawings, Photographs, and Puzzles. 

(Illustrated.) 662, 753, 854, 950, 1046, 1142 

The Letter-Box 671 76 6, 862, 958, 1054, 1150 

The Riddle-Box 672, 767, 863, 959, 1055, 1151 

PLAYS 

The Making of the Flag. A Patriotic Masque. (Illustra- 
tions from paintings by Henry Mosler and J. L. G. 

Ferris.) H. B. Alexander 726 

FRONTISPIECES 

" 'The King, at Your Service,' Answered the Old Gentleman." 

(Drawn by W. M. Berger.) Facing page 579 

Putting the Stars on the First Flag. Painted by J. L. G. Ferris " " 675 

"They Had Reached America at Last!" Drawn by Henry C. Pitz " " 771 

"Oh, the Surge of Southern Waters." Drawn by Henry C. Pitz " " 867 

September's Flower, the Goldenrod. Painted by Charles C. Curran " " 963 

"'Hail! All Hail! Lord James of Bedford Is with Us!'" (Drawn 

by E. C. Caswell.) " ■« 1059 



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(The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright, and articles must not be reprinted without special permission.) 



CONTENTS OF ST. NICHOLAS FOR MAY, 1921 

Frontispiece: " 'The King, at your service,' answered the old 
gentleman." Drawn by W. M. Berger 

Caught in the Act. Story. Illustrated by W. M. Berger Henry Ross '. 579 

The Pinch-Hitter. Story. Illustrated by C. M. Relyea Ralph Henry Barbour 580 

Manufactured Motives. Story. Illustrated by Victor Perard Louise Whitefield Bray 586 

Democracy. Verse. Illustrated by Albertine Randall Wheelan Isabel L. Whitney 592 

A Camera Adventure with Catbirds. Sketch Howard Taylor Middleton . . 593 

Illustrations from photographs 

Jack the Kill-O-Watter. Story. Illustrated by Herbert R. Norton Charles A. Hoyt 596 

Apple Blossoms. Verse Don C. Seitz 599 

Aesop's Fables. Retold in verse and illustrated by Oliver Herford 600 

Kit, Pat, and a Few Boys. Serial Story Beth B. Gilchrist 603 

Illustrated by C. M. Relyea 

Pirates of the Black Sea. Story. Illustration from photograph Mary Lena Wilson 610 

Keeping Fit for Golf. Sketch. Illustrated by C. M. Relyea Francis Ouimet 612 

Sir Whackitt's Final Round. Verse. Illustrated by the author Charles F. Lester 616 

The Luck of Denewood. Serial Story \ f 618 



Illustrated by Emilie Benson Knipe } Emilie Benson Kni P e j 

"Here Beginneth the First Lesson." Verse Berton Braley 626 

Illustrated by Georg Stoopendaal 
Preserves. Story. Illustrated by H. MacGilvary Adeline K. MacGilvary 627 

Boy Hunters in Demerara. Serial Story George Inness Hartley 630 

Illustrated by J. Clinton Shepherd 

Peter to the Rescue. Story. Illustrated by J. O'Neill Archibald Rutledge 636 

"Snuffer." Sketch. Illustrations from photographs J. Alden Loring 640 

The Dragon's Secret. Serial Story. Illustrated by C. M. Relyea Augusta Huiell Seaman ... . 642 

The Rogue's Bargains — A Hindu Story w. Norman Brown 649 

"Using His Head." Pictures. Drawn by E. W. Kemble 649 

The Watch Tower. Illustrations from photographs Edward N. Teall 650 

Nature and Science for Young Folk. Illustrated 655 

The Automatic Pilot — The "Talking Thread" (A. Russell Bond) — The 
Stars in May (Isabel M. Lewis) 

For Very Little Folk: 

The Tiptoe Twins' Flower Festival. Pictures drawn by 

Isabel Morton Fish 660 

St. Nicholas League. Illustrated. With Awards of Prizes for Stories, 

Poems, Drawings, Photographs, and Puzzles 662 

The Letter-Box 670 

The Riddle-Box 671 

St. Nicholas Stamp Page. Conducted by Samuel R. Simmons Advertising Pages 

rfr-'Sp' The Century Co. and its editors receive manuscripts and art material, submitted for publication, only on the understanding 
Wlz?& that they shall not be responsible for loss or injury thereto while in their possession or in transit. Copies of manuscripts 
should be retained by the authors. 

In the United States, the price of St. Nicholas Magazine is $4.00 a year in advance, or 35 cents a single copy; the price 
of a yearly subscription to a Canadian address is $4.35; the subscription price elsewhere throughout the world is S4-°o (the 
regular price of S4.00 plus the foreign postage, 60 cents). Foreign subscriptions will be received in English money at I pound 
4 shillings' in French money, 75 francs, covering postage. We request that remittances be by money-order, bank check, draft 
or registered letter. The Century Co. reserves the right to suspend any subscription taken contrary to its selling terms, and 
to refund the unexpired credit. PUBLISHED MONTHLY. 

The half-yearly parts of ST. NICHOLAS end with the October and April numbers respectively, and the red cloth covers 
are ready with the issue of these numbers; price $1.00 by mail, postpaid; the two covers for the complete volume, $2.00. We 
bind and furnish covers for S2.00 per part, or $4. 00 for the complete volume. (Carriage extra.) In sending the numbers to 
us, they should be distinctly marked with owner's name. Bound volumes are not exchanged for numbers. 

All subscriptions for, and all business matters in connection with, St. Nicholas Magazine should be addressed to 

THE CENTURY CO. 
Publication and Circulation Office, Concord, N. H. 
Editorial and Advertising Offices, 353 Fourth Ave., New York, N. Y. 
W MORGAN SHUSTER, President GEORGE L. WHEELOCK, Treasurer 

DON M. PARKER, Secretary JAMES ABBOTT, Ass I Treasurer 

Board of Trustees 

VOL XLVIII. GEORGE H. HAZEN, Chairman No. 7 

V GEORGE INNESS, JR. W. MORGAN SHUSTER 

(Copyright, 1921, by The Century Co.) (Title Registered U. S. Pat. Off.) 

(Entered as Second Class Matter, September 4, 1920, at the United States Post Office, Concord, N. H., under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. Entered at the Post Office Department, Ottawa, Canada.) 



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ST. NICHOLAS 

NEXT MONTH AND TO COME 



Sportsmanship WILLIAM T. TILDEN 

William T. Tilden, the National Lawn Tennis Champion for 1920, 
is to write a series of articles for St. Nicholas. The first of these 
will appear in June. 

Mary Lou's Medal MARGARET E. CURTIS 

Athletics, good sportsmanship, and a most unusual struggle con- 
nected with a medal between leaders in a girls' school. 

Hints for Campers 

S. LEONARD BASTIN AND OTHERS 

Nothing on earth is such glorious fun as camping — and nothing so 
easy to spoil by physical discomforts that are easily averted by 
the little know-how ways of experienced woodsmen. St. Nicholas 
for June will have a group of hints from knowing outdoor folk. 
With the help of this wood-lore, you'll be able to keep that glory- 
feeling undimmed. 

v Squirrel Folk SAMUEL SCOVILLE, JR. 

Mr. Scoville dipped his pen in strong woods-magic before he wrote 
this. It is fascinating; and some of the things his sharp eyes have 
discovered about the squirrel folk are surprising to learn, 

A Trip to Korea CHARLES BURNETT 

"The Land of the Morning Calm," as Korea used to be called, is 
not very calm, nowadays. It is stirring and growing up and chang- 
ing its old ways ; but one of St. Nicholas' traveler friends has caught 
for you a vivid picture of the queerness of the land, the simple, 
ancient ways of the people, before they pass. 

The Borrowers A. MAY HOLADAY 

A true story, this one, of an American boy at college who showed 
a very difficult sort of courage. His solution of a difficulty is not 
only brave but truly funny! 




Great excitement 



YOU boys dont get as excited about clothes as 
you do about fires, of course The real excite- 
ment comes when mother has to mend and father 
has to pay for the clothes 

By paying enough for quality at the start mother 
doesn't mend so often and father doesn't pay so 
much 

p ~j Hart Schaffner & Marx - 
12^1 J Boys' Clothes 

All-wool; tailored for service; guaranteed to satisfy or money back 1 8 

""IBM 



The Camp 
Offers Assistance 
to Parents 



4 



EVERY boy and girl of camp age will need during their long sum- 
mer vacation something which the average parent will find it 
inconvenient or impossible to give but which is within the 
province of the camp to supply. These children live during nine or 
ten months of the year under the rigid and exacting conventions of the 
home and school routine and they need complete relaxation from this 
nervous strain. It is not sufficient, however, that they be turned loose 
on the farm, at the summer home, at the summer resort, or be taken on 
an automobile trip, or that they be given merely plenty of fresh air, 
good food, physical exercise and opportunities for play. These plans 
lack some of the essentials of the most beneficial vacation experience. 
They seldom provide congenial companions in sufficient numbers and 
of suitable ages to insure the most desirable social reaction. Nor do 
they usually provide mature guidance and constant watchfulness as 
safeguards. The effort to keep the boys and girls with the family dur- 
ing the vacations calls for sacrifices either on the part of the parents or 
the children, and it is usually the latter who pay the penalty. 
•I The boy and girl need periodically just what the camp has to offer 
if they are to develop in the broadest way. They have certain latent 
instincts, tastes, abilities and traits of character, all of which do not find 
opportunities for expression in the artificial environment in which they 
live during most of the year, but which must find expression in some 
natural way. In camp these may be expressed in the happy freedom of 
the woods and streams, or in the hike up the mountain trail, or in the 
view from the mountain top which inspires thoughts about the bigness 
of the universe and the littleness of self. Or this self-expression may be 
in the games and sports, in the handicrafts, in the hobbies, in the team 
work or the group spirit, or in the intimate associations with others, all of 
which develop skill, adaptability, self-control, unselfishness, ability to mix 
happily with others and good comradeship. 
•J The camp is designed to meet all of 
these needs of the school boy and girl and 
it seems reasonable to hope that all par- 
ents will welcome its good offices in help- 
ing them solve their vacation problems. 

IRVING G. McCOLL. 



4 




THE KINEO CAMPS 



A Trips Section of Camp Kineo — the Kineo Ocean Camp, affords 
just the kind of experiences that most boys of middler age are seeking. 
Mt. Washington trip, ocean cruises, canoe trips, hiking trips, horseback 
riding trips, fresh water sports at Camp Kineo, salt water sports at Ocean 
Camp, sailing as well as all the land sports at Camp Kineo. No rout ine 
camp life. Widest range of experiences. All at reasonable cost. 

Same high grade, mature supervision and safeguards as at Camp Kineo. 
Same careful selection. 

Few places available in Camp Kineo for boys 7 to 1 1. Possible for boys 
12 to 15 to spend half time at this camp, and half at Ocean Camp, without 
taking all trips. 

Send for illustrated booklet, state age 
and which camp and program interests. 



CAMP KINEO 
Harrison, Maine 

For boys 7 to 15 inclusive 



KINEO OCEAN CAMP 
; On Maine Seacoast 

For boys 12 to 1G inclusive 



IRVING N. McCOLL, Hotel McAlpin, New York City 



Yellowstone Park 
Forest and Trail CAMP 



We utilize Camp Roosevelt 
(estab. 1907), famous camp 
site of Pres. Roosevelt and 
John Burroughs, 1903. Heart 
of Yellowstone Nat'l Park 
scenery and wild life. Best 
location in America. Wood- 
craft and trail lore under 
guidance graduate foresters 



and naturalists. Saddle 
horses, swimming, fishing, 
real exploration and wilder- 
ness adventure. Complete 
tour Park Geyserland. Official 
endorsement. Booklet. Ad- 
dress Prof. Alvin G. Whit- 
ney, care Syracuse University, 
Syracuse, N. Y. 




Summer Cawpsi for itopg— Conttmteo 



WEQUAQUET 

The Cape Cod Camp for Boys 

Ages 9-15 

Located near Barnstable, midway between Plymouth and Provincetown, 

combines 

Lake Woods Country Seashore 

and offers every form of 
Fresh Water Land and Salt Water Sport 

A small select camp with a big purpose, limited to thirty boys and empha- 
sizing individual development. During the summer a series of delightful 
and instructive trips is taken to all points of historic interest on Cape Cod. 

For illustrated booklet address 

FORREST B. WING, Director, 1400 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 
Telephone Brookline — 4129 




New Jersey, Bordentown. 
TV /tttitutt? fiT a ttt a Summer Camp for Boys and Young Men. 
MlJNJNh/-WAWA Located at Lake of Two Rivers Algonquin 
Provincial Park, in the heart of Ontario Highlands. Unsurpassed for fishing, 
canoeing, observation of nature and wild animal photography. Just the 
camp you have been looking for. Wholesome, moral atmosphere. Highest 
references. Reasonable terms. Write for booklet D. W. L. Wise, Ph.B. 




Camp Winnecook for Boys 

Lake Winnecook, Unity, Maine 

igth Season. Athletic fields for all Sports. Horseback riding, 
canoeing, sailing, motor-cruising, Indian tribes, head-dress 
for deeds of valor. Indian pageant. Archery, wood -craft, 
auto trips, hikes. Boy Scouts. Photography; Arts and 
Crafts. Tents and bungalows in pines. Every boy takes 
part in everything. 

One price — No extras. Send for booklet. 

Herbert L. Rand, T3 Hemenway Road, Salem, Mass. 




Massachusetts, Northampton. 

Camp Norridgewock SSjrSMF^foS* 

the Maine Woods. OurCounselors aretrained Physical Directors. Fish- 
ing, canoe trips, baseball, swimming and tutoring. Special oversight 
by a camp mother for younger boys. BoyB eight to sixteen years. 
Illustrated booklet. Arthcb, M. Condon. 




tMAHrlJUB- 



Two distinct camps. 15th season. Recreation camp for boys 
8 to 16. Tutoring camp with separate director for boys who 
desire to study. Address RALPH F. PERRY, Box M, 1535 
Central Ave., Indianapolis, Ind. 



SAGAWATHA LODGE 

Bantam Lake, Conn. 100 miles from New York City. Cabin 
Camp for 40 Boys. Experienced councillors for health, hikes, 
sports, scout work, tutoring if desired. Booklet from 



DR. J. H. HOBBS 



248 W. 76th Street 



New York City 



Columbus 3595 




SHAWNEE 

A Summer Camp For Boys 
TWIN LAKES, PIKE COUNTY, PA. 



A. O. MlCHENER . 

Samuel D. Parry 



Directors 



SHAWNEE, the camp incom- 
parable, provides all that the 
heart can desire. Superior lo- 
cation and equipment. _ The 
finest companionship. Limited 
enrollment. 

HORSES ? - OF COURSE ! 

For booklet or information address 

Camp Shawnee, 2121 W. Venango St. 

Philadelphia 

SHAWNEE SATISFIES! 



J 



Summer Camps! for pops— Contimteb 



CAMP PASSUMPSIC 

Lalce /airiee, Vermont 

The Ideal Camp for Young Boys where the Aim is Health and Happiness. 

Illustrated Booklet on Request. 
WILLIAM W.CLENDENIN.A.M. 120 Vista Place, MT. VERNON, N.Y. 




PEQUAWKET CAMPS 

In the White Mountains. Private pond; wooded shores; sandy 
beach. Canoeing, boating, motor boating. All water 
sports. Scoutcraft, Woodcraft. Mountain climbing. Field 
Athletics. Horses. White Mountain Mineral Spring 
Water. Tutoring. $200, eight weeks. Illustrated booklet. 
MR. and MRS. EUGENE I. SMITH, Conway, N. H. 



New Hampshire, on Lake Ossipee, near Intervale. 

CAMP OSSIPEE 

For Boys under 16. Seventeenth Seaaon. 
Conducted like a club, solely for the benefit of the members them- 
selves, not for profit. Illustrated booklet free on application to O. E. 
Guild, Secy., Box A-2, Peekskill, N. Y. 

Maine, Readfield. 

CAMP MARANACOOK 

Offers to a carefully selected group of boys, a camp with an unusual 
equipment and location and under the direction of mature and experi- 
enced leaders. Camping and canoeing trips. Permanent mountain 
camps for all members. Two camps. Limited number. 7 to 12, 13 to 17. 

William H. Morgan, Director. 




CAMP KINAPIK 

The Woodcraft Camp for Boys from 8 to 18 

ON LAKE KEZAR, MAINE 

Come to the lakes, woods and rivers of Maine; the White Moun- 
tains of New Hampshire. Swimming, fishing, Council fires. 
8ecrets of camp and woods. Mountain trips and camps. Canoo 
trips near and far. Wilderness and special trips for older boyB. 
Age groupB. Particular supervision. Resident physician. Camp 
mother. Endorsed by Ernest Thompson Seton. For. illustrated 



booklet, address 



HARVEY C. WENT, Director, Bridgeport, Conn. 




CAMP CEBENNEK Fa ?%l. A W h 

ONE month at fully equipped main camp on Toreey Lake. All 
land and water sports. One month on Allagash Canoe Trip 
through the big woods of Maine. Best fishing and photography 
of big game. Information given concerning Cebennek's twenty won- 
derful summers. Junior Camp for boys nine to twelve. 

John A. Chase, Kents Hill. Me. 



CAMP WILDMERE £?S 

Long Lake Harrison, Maine 

In Sebago Lake region. 21st season. 48 acres on sheltered cove. 
33 miles waterway for canoe and launch trips. Every sport a boy 
wants. Develops self-reliance, manliness, fair play, robust phy- 
sique. Permanent buildings, tents. Large athletic fields. Spring 
water, best food. Christian auspices. 
Booklet. 

IRVING S. WOODMAN 
6 West 82nd St., New York City 




Summer Camps for Jiopg— Contmueb 



( On Lake 
Maxinkuckee) 




ULVER 



SUMMER 
SCHOOLS 



Naval Woodcraft Cavalry Artillery Aviation 

There is only oue Culver. Aud in all the world there is nothing just like 
a summer at Culver for a real, live, red-blooded boy. It is the summer with 
a thrill in it. Good old suu-up till sundown days full of pranks, sports, 
tramps — a camper's paradise. 

Experts teach and guide- Perhaps to sail a boat, ride a horse, pilot a 
hydroplane, fire a " 75 " or do an Indian War Dance. No make-believe — all 
real stuff. The Naval School is under a distinguished Admiral. Culver 
boys enjoy all th- good things of all the camps plus many unique things 
that only Culver offers. Woodcraft School for younger boys. Send for the 
catalog of the school that interests you. 



Culv 



ADJUTANT'S AIDE 



Indiana 




CAMP WAMPANOAG 

15th Season Cape Cod, Buzzards Bay 

A salt water camp for boys from 8 to 16. Scouting over 
old Indian trails. Land and water sports, prizes. Athletics 
under experienced college men. Military drill. Camp 
mother. Booklet. 

MRS. BertrAND E. TAYLOR, Director 
Mr. ALDRICH TAYLOR, Advisory Director 
240 Grant Avenue Newton Centre, 




Massachusetts, Orleans, Cape Cod. 



CAMP AREY 

For Boys 

The Camp of the Sea. A home camp for boys, situated on an 
inlet from Pleasant Bay. Depp sea fishing. A fresh water lake 
nearby surrounded by pinewoods. For information and arrange- 
ment for interview address 

Wm. Bard Johnstone, Orleans, Mass. 




LENAPE 

The Pennsylvania Camp for Boys 

An ideal camp on crystal clear Lake Arthur in the heart 
of the Poconos. Conveniently reached. Group limited. 
Splendid equipment. Only boys' camp in Pennsyl- 
vania giving horse- back riding. Every activity, athletics, 
swimming, aquaplaning, boating, hikes, woodcraft, auto 
trips, etc. Resident physician. Experienced councillors. 
Associated with the well-known Oneka Camps. Write 
for booklet. 

ERNEST W. SIPPLE 
350 West Duval Street, German town, Phila., Pa. 




CAMP TY-GLYN A SUMMER « roi B0YS " 

Vi * * MOWYN LAKE, ROOSEVELT, WIS. 

Horseback riding, tennis, canoe trips with guides, swimming, 
baseball, basket-ball, manual training, wireless telegraphy. All 
counselors college men, each one a specialist. For booklet, write 
to G. A. Roger, 700 W. Euclid Avenue, Detroit, Michigan. 



Maine, Little Sebago Lake 

AIMHI 

You will never regret it 
Camp Aimhi is a small camp for boys 
Let us tell you about it 
Matjeice L. Hodgson, 96 Shornecliffe Road, Newton, Mass. 



CAMP KATAHDIN j 

FOREST LAKE, SWEDEN, MAINE 
Juniors Seniors Trips Athletic Conditioning 
For Boys and Young Men 



A camp with 21 years of 
splendid traditions. 

Appointments of camp, 
simple. Real camp life. 
Health conditions excep- 
tional. Activities include 
real mountain and canoe 
trips, all branches land and 
water sports, horseback 
riding, woodcraft, nature 
study, tutoring. 

Special athletic training 
season continues to Sep- 
tember fourteenth. 

Number limited. Refer- 
ences required. Send for 
booklet, giving age and 
pertinent facts. 

George E. Pike, B.S. 
Ralph K. Bearce, A.M. 

Duxbury, Mass. 




Summer Camps! for pops— Continueb 



Trip Camp for Senior Boys 
14 to 16 years 



Virion 



Two Camps for Junior Boys 
8 to 13 years 




14th SEASON 

ADVANTAGES : 
Complete equipment 

Careful organization 

Mature counselors 

Regulated sports 

New dining pavilion 

25 miles of lake shore 



ACTIVITIES : 
Long canoe and mountain trips. 
Swimming, paddling, fishing, horseback riding. 
Hiking, tennis, sailing, rowing shells. 
Campcraft, woodcraft, nature work. 
Scouting, army games, life-saving. 
Inter-camp meets for land and water sports. 



For illustrated booklet, address C. E. COBB, 4 Main St., Denmark, Maine 



Connecticut, Bantam Lake. 

CAMP WONPOSET 

A camp for young boys in the Berkshires, 100 miles from New 
York City. Everything a boy can wish for. $25,000 equipment. 
Write for camp book. 

ROBERT TIND ALE, 31 East 71st St., New York City. 



Camp Terra Alta 

Terra Alta, W. Va. 



Directed by The Commandant of the Staunton Military 
Academy. 

On Lake Terra Alta, main line Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, 
130 miles southeast of Pittsburgh. 2300 feet above sea level. 
Pure magnesian spring water. 

$20,000 equipment. Lodge building with 15bed rooms for use 
in case of sickness. Complete water system, shower baths. 
Natural gas lighting system. All athletic and water sports, 
military drill, target practice, boxing, bowling, billiards. In- 
struction in High and Grammar school subjects. 

Jane 30 to Aug. 25, $200. 

113 boys from 23 states last session. Free booklet. 

Until June 7th address The Commandant, Box 143F, Staunton, Va. 

After June 7th, Camp Terra Alta, Terra Alta, W. Va. 




CAMP WAGANAKI 

For Boys 8 to 15^ 

A camp paradise on shores of Upper Stone Pond, off the 
beaten trailB, where fishing is good and wild creatures 
abound. Boys gather rare specimens, study rock formations 
and learn to love nature. Dining room with excellent living 
in director's home. Broad, protected porches for sleeping 
quarters. Tennis, Swimming, Canoeing, Baseball, hiking and 
other sports. Counsellors are masters in sympathy with boys 
and know how to lead them. Numbers limited. Address 
C. Q. WARREN. Ileadmaster Marquand School 
55 Hanson Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Michigan, Manistee. 
r*A"M"'P TOQTTRO Under the management of Todd Semi- 

wumu* lu^rsu nary for BoyS( Woodstock> in. 

Fishing, hiking, boating^ swimming. Wonderland of woods and water. 
Unusual equipment. Reasonable rates. Overnight boat ride (direct) 
from Chicago. Address Noble Hill, Woodstock, Illinois. 



CAMP* VEGA 

CHARLESTON LAKE 

ONTARIO, CANADA 

(Only 1% hours from New York City) 




A Canadian Camp for American boys, conducted by 
Americans with the highest ideals. Located in Canada's 
mostpicturesquelake region (Rideau and Beverley Chain) , 
25 miles from the Thousand IslaudB. Ten-acre private 
island. Large central buildings. Bungalow sleeping 
quarters. Unusual equipment. Three motor launches; 
marvelous canoe trips. Unsurpassed fishing. 

Our aim is to provide a growing boy with a wonderful 
summer vacation, coupled with the inspiring leadership 
of the highest type of American college men. 

Our Headcouncilor is Mr. Robert M. McCulloch, Prince- 
ton 1921, an Honor man and a leader in every sense of 
the word. He is Captain of the Princeton Track Team, 
Member of the Senior Council, Member of the Nassau 
Herald Board, President of the Princeton Terrace Club 
and Chairman of the Press Club. 

Ateammate of McCulloch, Donald R. Foresman, Prince- 
ton 1921, another Honor man, will have charge of Track 
and Tennis at Camp Vega. 

Yale gives us Perry Bean, an end on Yale's 1920 football 
team and member of the Yale wrestling squad, who will 
have charge of baseball and wrestling. 

Another Yale man, Capt. John C. Diller, will have 
charge of canoeing and trips. 

Our swimming Instructor i3 Horry Cayley from Har- 
vard; while our Camp Physician is Ralph L. Fisher of 
Johns Hopkins. 

Such is the inspiring leadership and association for 
your boy at CAMP VEGA. Address 

WILLIAM S. HAZEL 
16 West 47th St. New York City 



Summer Camps: for pops— Continue!) 




Camp TUe-e-yal)-yalj 



Among the Thousand Islands 
St. Lawrence River 

BIG FISH aren't the only BIG 
things for the Boys — from early 
morn until the big camp fire before 
"Taps," there is every healthy sport 
under careful supervision of "Big Bro- 
ther" councilors. Big eats and big 
hearts will send your boy home in the 
fall a bigger and better boy. 

Send for Illustrated Booklet 

HARRISON H. BUXTON 

Supervisor Physical Training, Pub. Scks. 
20 Waverly Place, Utica, N. Y. 



CAMP 
CHENANGO 

ON OTSEGO LAKE 
Cooperstown, N. Y. 

Give your boy 
a vacation that counts 

Self-reliance — Happiness — H ealth 

Wholesome Food — Mountain Air 
Systematic Exercise — Ideal Surroundings 

E. L. FISHER, 24 N. Terrace, Maplewood, N. J. 




Send for 
Illustrated Booklet 



Camp ftJachu sett" 

FOR BOYS 




Lake Asquam, Holderness, N. H. 

19th season. 7 buildings. 
Boating, fishing, canoeing, 
swimming. New athletic 
field. Sports are planned 
according to physical ability 
of each boy. No tents. 
Fisher huts. Music, games 
and a good time every night. 
Camp contests. Tutoring 
if desired. References. 
Write for booklet. 

REV. LORIN WEBSTER, L.H.D. 
Holderness School, 
Plymoulh, N. H. 



ST. NICHOLAS CAMP EDITOR 
353 Fourth Avenue, New York City 

Please have information about camps sent to me. 



My age is Location desired. 

Large or small camp 

Name of camp I have attended. . . 

Name 

Address 




CAMP MONADNOCK 



Jaffrey, N. H. Eighth Season 

Juniors 8-12 Seniors 12-16 

Do you want your boy to know the joy of camping out in real 
woods to swim and paddle like an Indian, become skilled in 
nm-aid, handling of tools, signalling, woodcraft, and excel in 
athletic games? Mature college men will help and safeguard 
him in these activities. Extensive equipment. Careful selection 
of boys. Prominent physicians among patrons. Illustrated 
booklet. 

FRED'K ERNST, Director 
Westminster School Simsbury, Connecticut 



CAMP MASSAWEPIE 

In the Adirondacks 

Wonderful location in the virgin forests on the shores of 
Lake Massawepie. Splendid equipment, handsome build- 
ings, club house, bowling alleys, baseball and tennis 
grounds. Fine sand beaches, good fishing, swimming 
athletic sports. Tutoring, forestry, woodcraft. All activ- 
ities under careful supervision. Season July 6 to Aug 31 
For information, apply to Lt. Col. Guido F. Verbeck' 
SAINT JOHN'S SCHOOL 
Box S, 5. Manlius, N. Y. 



Massachusetts, Cape Cod. 

BONNIE DUNE 

. All the fun of camp, all the care of home given a few boys (8-14 
years), on breezy, sunny, healthy Cape Cod. 
Mrs. Dwiqht L. Rogers, Dwiqht L. Rogers, Jr., Directors 
8 Parkside Road, Providence, R. I. 



CAMP WILDWOOD 

"*4 Boy's Paradise" 
Fish Creek . . Wisconsin 

All athletic activities, water sports, splendid table, 
and every care that a parent could give. May we 
send our brochure, "Camp Wildwood"? Camp opens 
July 1st, closes August 25th. Address W. B. Biro, 
1594 Rydal Mount Road, Cleveland Heights, Ohio. 



Schroon Lake Camp 

For Boys 8 to 17 16th Season J 

Location — On a 300-acre tract in the Adirondacks, 
with $-mile lake frontage. Invigorating pine woods. A 
$75,000 equipment — Club house, indoor gym, bun- 
galow tents, athletic fields, 4 tennis courts. Sports — 
Swimming, boating, canoeing, fishing, horseback riding, 
hiking, baseball, etc. Woodcraft. Leaders — Experi- 
enced college councilors, directing instruction and sports. 
Senior and Junior departments. 

+ DR. I. S. MOSES 
S74 West End Ave. A Director 
New York City (Tel., Schuyler 5810) 



Parent's Signature 



Summer Camp* for pops!— Continued 



<%> IDLEWILD 

For Boys under 18 30th Season 

JOHN M. DICK, B.D., Advisory Director 
On Manhannock Island, Lake Winnipesaukee, N. H. 

Manhannock is a regular Robinson Crusoe Island with seven mileB of 
lake shore, owned and occupied exclusively by Idlewild. 

Here boys camp and fish and build log shacks, play land and water 
baseball, row and paddle, sleep in tents and live in the open. Big speed 
boat, small motorboats. canoes, row boats and war canoes. 
Vigilance for safety Illustrated Booklet 

L. D. ROYS, 312 Exchange Bldg., Boston, Mass, 
THE TEELA-WOOKET CAMPS FOR GIRLS 
Roxbury, Vermont. Under the same management. 




'The Purple Slipper" 




hold up our heads and 1< 
Don't forget Dad's address is 



HELLO, BOYS, won't you go fish- 
ing with me and my three 
brothers, at my Dad's camp 
this summer? It is 

WAWBEWAWA 

The Canoeing Camp for Boys 

On Squam Lake at Ashland, N. H. 

We'll go on lots of canoe trips 
and camping-out trips, in- 
stead of just loafing around 
camp and playing games. 
We'll learn how to follow a 
trail through the woods and 
up mountains; to build a 
cooking fire and mix a 
" twist " and toss " flap- 
jacks;" to paddle a canoe for 
fishing and cruising and 
racingand "stunts:"to make 
a browse bed and sleep rolled 
up in a blanket under the 
stars ; and we'll know how to 
k the other fellows in the eye. 



DR. JOHN B. MAY, Box 1321, Cohasset, Mass. 



CD 



PE/SAC O OK 

N. SUTTON, N. H. 23d SEASON 

Limited number of desirable boys, ages 9 
to 16. All field and water sports. Expe- 
rienced counselors. Wholesome food. 

Address R. B. MATTERN, M.S. 
Dobbs Ferry-on-Hudson New York 



.CD 



Camp Eastford 




The place for a boy 
Eastford, Conn. 



For wide-awake, clean, manly 
boys from seven to seventeen. 
For boys who like scout life, the 
open country, the long wood 
trails. For boys who want 
to swim, fish, hike, ride a 
horse or paddle a canoe. 
College and university men 
who were just such boys 
direct all camp activi- 
ties. Comfortable build- 
ings, well located. Lots 
of good food. Catalog. 

STANLEY KELLEY 
Director 
Pomfret, Conn. 



CAMP KOKOSING 

FOR BOYS 

ON LAKE KOKOSING 

ORANGE COUNTY VERMONT 




Select boyB from 8 to 16 years. Camp of 400 acres entirely sur- 
rounding the Camp's 100-acre lake , Newly built bungalows for 
all. Every sport on land and in water. Mountain hikes. Wood- 
craft. Tutoring. Counselors of finest calibre. Special over- 
sight by camp mother for youngest boys. Rate $225 for Season.. 
Booklet. DIRECTORS 
Edmund C. Cook. A.M., Mrs. Isabf.lle T. bagley. 

Saint Stephen's College. Tome School for BoyB,._ 

Annandale-oii-Hudson. N. ST. , Port Deposit. Md. 

Head Counselor, Major P. S. Prince. 



CAMP TbNKAWA 



BOYS 7 to 18 



"STICK 
TOGETHER 



Located on Lake Chatauqua, New York, 
amid beautiful mountain scenery. 15l)0 
ft. elevation. All land and water sports, 
hiking, horseback riding. Dramatics, 
tutoring, nature study. Jolly compan- 
ionship. Good food, Home care. Season 
8 weeks. (Formerly on Lake Erie). 
Under same management as Camp Twa- 
ne-ko-tah for Girls. Write for Booklet. 
Boys under personal direction of 

S. CARL STOLL 
College Hill, Snyder, N. Y. 




Hmmmer Camps for ^ops— Contmueb 




Camp Pok-o'- Moonshine 

For Boys 8 to 17 

In the Adirondacks on beautiful Long Pond. 
300 acres of woodland. Boys divided into 
five separate groups according to ages. 
Charges include R. R. fares, trips, laundry, 
and two hours of tutoring daily. 

One of the Oldest and Best 
Address DR. C. A. ROBINSON, Principal 
Peekskill Military Academy 
16th Season Peekskill. N. Y. 



To be a Woodcrafter in personal touch 
with the real 




DAN BEARD 

is a rare privilege. Are you going to 
be one of them? Membership limited. 

DAN BEARD WOODCRAFT CAMP 

In charge of the famous scout him- 
self. On beautiful Pennsylvania 
mountain lake. All the outdoor ac- 
tivities that boys like. Sound phys- 
ical, mental and moral training. No 
ertra charge for tutoring. Specially 
endorsed by ex-President Roosevelt. 

Apply 89 Bowne Ave., Flushing,L.I.,N.Y. 



Connecticut, Mystic 

HICKORY ROW 

Ideal short time vacation from two to four weeks for real boys — ages 12 
(o 15 — on a 60-acre farm. Salt water bathing, horseback riding. A 
taste of real farm life under best living conditions. Address 

L. D. Botnton, R. F. D. No. 2, Mystic, Conn. 

New Hampshire, West Swanzey. 

"THE OLD HOMESTEAD" CAMP 

Swanzey Lake, West Swanzey, N. H. Exclusive camp for 
boys (8-18 years). Former summer home of late Denman 
Thompson. $50,000 equipment; bowling alleys, stables, theatre, 
parents' bungalow. All camp activities under skilled leader- 
ship. Excellent table a specialty. College men wanted to 
act as councilors. Catalogue. 

CARROLL N. JONES 
South Windsor, Conn. After May 1, West Swanzey, N. H. 

-Bear Mountain Camp 1 



Harrison, Maine 



For Boys 



TN the Maine pines, on the sandy shores o£ Bear Pond, 
satisfies the most discriminating parents. Modern build- 
ings and equipment, conscientious, experienced supervision 
by mature men and women. Boys' happiness, health and 
safety are first considerations in this exceptional camp. The 
best food, personal care, land and water sports, mountain 
climbing, campcraft. Booklet. 

HAROLD J. STAPLES, Director, Biddeford, Me 





South Pond Cabins 

A Camp for Boys 

Fitzwilliam, N. H. 

Founded 1908 by Rollin M. Gallagher (Formerly Master at 
Middlesex School). 1200 feet above the sea. The needs of 
each boy are studied and his activities adapted to his capacity. 
Water and land sports. One counsellor to five boys. Address 
Reginald Nash. Director, Millon Academy, or 
Mrs. Rollin M. Gallagher, North Bussel! St., Millon, Mass. 
Telephone Milton 111)1 -W. 



Thousand Island 
Park Camp 

For boys under 18 

The Camp is at Thousand Island Park on Wellesley Island, lying in the 
historic and beautiful St. Lawrence River not far from the foot of Lake 
Ontario. Excursion boats make regular trips among the Thousand Islands 
and out into Lake Ontario. 

Splendid accommodations are secured in cottages with all modern con- 
veniences. Electric lights, baths and home cooking assure comfort and 
health. Baseball diamonds, tennis courts, horse-back riding, swimming, 
motor boating, canoeing, etc. Separate camps for Juniors and Seniors. 
Expert supervision of all activities. Resident physician, dentist and 
nurse. Address 

WALTER C. CROUCH, Friends Central School 

15th and Race Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 



CAMP SOKOKIS 

Bridgton, on Long Lake, Maine 

Good times, good chums, good leaders — a small 
camp with bungalows and complete equipment for 
all athletic games and water sports. Booklet. 
ORLANDO S. FERRY, 1607 Ave. N., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



p................-! 

The Boys' 
Camp Manual 

By Charles K. Taylor 



r70R the use of boys attending any camp, 
* conductors of camps, and for boys who 
love the great outdoors and wish to develop 
themselves in manly ways. Many illustrations. 

At Bookstores 
$1.75 



THE CENTURY CO. 

if 

353 Fourth Avenue New York City 



L. 



Summer Camps for ?Boj>£i— Contmueo 




Los Alamos Ranch 

A Wonderful Summer Camp 

On a big ranch high up in the cool Rocky Moun- 
tains. Pack train trips under a former Forest 
Officer through the greatest mountain country in 
America. Excellent trout fishing. A week at the 
round-up in the cow camp. Limited to 18 boys, 
better write at once for folder. Address 

A. J. CONNELL, Director 
Los Alamos Ranch, Otowi, P. O., New Mexico 




Massachusetts, Ashland. 
BOB-WHITE For boys under 15. Seventh 
season. Horseback riding thru 
woodland trails, tennis tournaments, athletic fields, camp- 
ing trips, boating, etc. Illlustrated booklet. 

R. C. Hill. S. B. Hayes. 



New York, Woodland 

CAMP WAKE ROBIN 

Younger boys exclusively. Seventeenth season. Make your boy 
strong, happy, through an out-of-door life, including woodcraft, hiking, 
nature-lore, manual training, swimming, and all sports. Matured su- 
pervision and modern sanitation. Booklet. Mr. H. N. Little, New 
Jersey, Jersey City, Lincoln High School. 

Pennsylvania, Mehoopany. 

FERN CAMP 

FOR BOYS — 8 to 16 years old. Located in Eastern Pennsylvania. 
Baseball, tennis, boating, swimming, hikes, auto trips. Tutoring free. 
For booklet address B. M. Slater, Mehoopany, Pennsylvania. 



Pole Bridge Camp 

Matamoras, Penn. 

A rugged vacation in the forests 
of the Water Gap region over- 
looking the Delaware, only go 
miles from New York. Mountain, 
water, and indoor sports. Buildings, 
tents, equipment up-to-date. 25 
Boys, 6 Yale councilors, parental 
care and big brother inspiration. 
Illustrated booklet and references. 

E. HOYT PALMER, Manager 

75 Yale Sta., New Haven, Conn. 




ASH-NO-CA 

"A BOYS' CLUB" 

IN THE MOUNTAINS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Notaschool, not a camp, but a place planned, equipped, 
and conducted for the pleasure and physical and moral 
welfare of boys under seventeen during the summer. 
Delightful climate. No mosquitoes. Sports include hik- 
ing, mountain climbing, camping, canoeing, swimming, 
boating, tennis, baseball, track, golf, EVERYTHING 
A BOY LIKES. Fine buildings furnish healthful 
sleeping accommodations and other buildings ample 
place for recreation in wet weather. Boys have best 
possible care. Large farm furnishes abundance of 
wholesome food. 714 acre tract. 

Address George Jackson, Asheville School - Asheville, N. C. 



CAMP CHAMPLAIN F B ° Q % 

On Mallett's Bay, Lake Cham plain 

Bclwoen the (ireen and Adirondack Mountains 
Bright-eyed and nimble-limbed, they will return to you in 
the autumn, saying: "It was great!" Great it is, for it 
includes canoeing, swimming, hiking, baseball, basket- 
ball, riding—under careful supervision. Write for booklet. 

WM. H. BROWN 

President Berkeley -Irving School 

307 West 83rd Street ^ New York City 





Our booklet tells more 
Write for one 



CAMP PENN 



Valcour Island 



Lake Champlain, N. Y. 



A Camp for Virile, Live Boys Only! 

The unusual and the usual land and water sports. Special Stunts. 
Long Hikes. Opportunity to follow up your particular interest- 
woodcraft, photography, field engineering, playing in a big band, etc 

Special care given to food for growing, active boys. 
500 acres of camping ground. A splendid staff. 

l-J • -i ft p -\Tg-\l T CHARLES K. TAYLOR 

renn is the Camp ror YOU cartel Academy 

* Orange, N. J. 



SUMMER CAMPS FOR GIRLS 






PINE KNOLL CAMP 

FOR GIRLS CONWAY, N. H. 

Heart of White Mountains, on lovely secluded Lake Iona 
Most beautiful girls* camp iu Now England. Noted for its 
flue equipment and splendid class of girls. Full ramp program 
of riding, athletics, water sports, etc. Number limited to forty 
One councilor to every three girls. Constant personal super- 
vision by the Director. Eighth season. Booklet. 

MRS. FRANCES H. WHITE 
Rock Ridge Hall Wellesley, Mass. 



fib.- 






"'ft •[ 



Camp Mystic own 
GO HP. 54 feet i 



them Light, I 
speed 20 mile. 



CAMP MYSTIC 



MYSTIC 
CONNECTICUT 
"MISS JOBE'S CAMP FOR GIRLS" 

The salt water camp for girls. Half way between New York and Boston 
Life m the New England hills, woods, and by the sea. Unusual build 
mgs, tent bungalows. Shower and tub baths. Modern sanitation. Salt 
water sports, motorbpal ing, swimming, safe canoeing, horseback riding 
dancing, field athletics, arts and crafts, dramatics. Camp life and trip! 
under the personal direction of Miss Jobe who has had nine seasons o 
practical experience (summer and winter) in camping and exploration it 
the Canadian Rockies. Care for the safety and health of each camper 
Juniors and Seniors. Age 8-18. Catalog. 

MARY L. JOBE, A. M., F.R.G.S., Room63,50Morningside Drive, New York 




The great, open out-doors, endless opportunities for 
delightful trips, splendid horses, have made horseback 
riding a popular sport at Wynona-Westmore. Expert 
supervision by our directors make it safe. The An- 
nual Horse Show is the big social event of the sum- 
mer. Many visitors come to see the riders compete 
for prizes. Only Wynona-Westmore campers take part 
in the show. 

Swimming, canoeing, tennis, golf, archery, hiking 
and other out-door activities. Competent counselors 
direct the whole camp life. Wynona-Westmore girls 



learn assurance, consideration for others, the joy of 
helpful living. Every precaution taken for health and 
comfort, every effort bent toward enjoyment. Ideally 
located on Lake Morey and Lake Willoughby in the 
Green Mountains. 

WYNONA CAMPS 
276 Summer Street Fitchburg, Mass. 

Lake Morey Club, a modern hotel 
under same management. 



_4_ % \ 



Summer Camps for <§trte— Contintteb 




THE ANCHORAGE 

Finest Appointed Summer Camp for Girls in the United States 

On Beautiful Lake Winnipesaukee, N. H.— Foothills White Mountains 



Modern Bungalows. 
Electric Lights. 
Fine Saddle Horses. 
Free Riding and Instruc- 
tion. 
Mo tor Boa ting . 
Canoeing. 
Swimming, Diving. 




Tennis, Basket-ball, 

Baseball, Archery. 

Arts and Crafts, Basketry. 

Music, Dancing. 

Volley Ball, Hiking. 

Motion Pictures. 

Water Carnival. 



Highest Grade Counselors and Instructors from Foremost American Colleges. 
V Modern Dairy and Farm connected. 

Send for booklet to 

ESTHER B. SUTCLIFFE, Secretary, care of State Normal School, FRAMINGHAM, MASS. 



Summer Camps; for (girls;— Conttnueb 



20th 
Season 



For 
Girls 




Real camp life on a big lake and in 

the big woods. 
Careful organization and supervision. 
Happy and healthful outdoor life. 
Regulated sports, on land and water. 
Reverence, service, self-reliance. 




Long canoe and mountain trips. 
Paddling, swimming, life-saving. 
Sailing, rowing shells, hiking. 
Horseback riding, archery, tennis. 
Music, dancing, pageantry., 
Campcraft, handcrafts, nature work. 

For illustrated booklet address MR. and MRS. C. E. COBB, 
20 Main St., Denmark, Maine. 



3 Camps 

Ages 
8 to 21 




A-T Lake Winnipesaukee. 
C-amp Acadia for Girls, 
a-ll land and water sports, 
d-o you want to join us ? 
i — llustrated booklet, 
a-ge limit 8 to 16 years. 
DR. and MRS. J. GRANT QUIMBY, Lakeport, N. H. 



I3lh 
Season 



&MP IWA-NE-KO-TAW 




A CAMP FOR GIRLS 



Ideal location on beautiful 
Lake Chatauqua, N. Y. (For- 
merly on Lake Erie.) Fifth 
season of 8 weeks. 1500 ft, el- 
evation. All land and water 
sports, horseback riding, hik- 
ing, dramatics, interpretative 
dancing, handicraft and na- 
ture study. Complete equip- 
ment, healthful surround- 
ings, good food. Junior and 
Senior Camps under experi- 
enced Councillors and per- 
sonal supervision of 

Rev. and Mrs. R. S. STOLL 
College Hill, Snyder, N. Y. 



Altitude 




HELDERBERG MOUNTAINS 
ALBANY CO., N. Y. 

Does your girl enjoy Wafer Sports? Does she like Athletics? 
Is she interested in Handicraft Work? Would you choose 
Experienced College Graduates to supervise her Daily 
Routine? Do you want her to enjoy an Ideal Summer Out 
of Doors? Then Enroll her at 

Orinsekwa "The Camp in the Pines'* 

Non-Sectarian — For further information apply to 
JEANNETTE FRANK, A. B., A. M., 529 West 179th Street, New York 



Vermont, Lake Fairlee. 

WYODA Lake Fa:rlee . Vermont. The Ideal Home Camp for 
Young Girls. Parental care. Camp Mother. All sports. 
Swimming, canoeing, handicraft, woodcraft, riding, dancing, dramatics, 
nature study, mountain trips, French conversation. Booklet. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hakvet Newcomer, Lowerre Summit Park, Yonkers, N. Y. 



CAMP WINNAHKEE 



FOR GIRLS 



ON MALLETT'S BAY, LAKE CHAMPLAIN f££ 

America's Beautiful "Inland Sea" 

A MONG the pines of Vermont, where the air is a 
i tonic and the very earth a friend. Oh, what a 
wonderful place for an outdoor summer brimming 
with fun ! All laud and water sports — Riding, motor- 
boating, dancing, dramatics, handicraft, 
basketry. Experienced councilors. 
Trained nurse. Booklet. 




Summer Camps for <^trlss — Conttnueb 



Senior and Junior Camps for Girls (under 20), Roxbury, Vt. 

"Who Hikes to Kowshicum ? 



9 9 



Dear Girls: — 

One morning a few weeks ago a soft voice 
whispered among the white birch and pine 
and spruce trees on the mountain-side above 
the Teela-Wooket Camps. It was a warm 
little breeze from the Southland saying 
spring had come. 

It hinted of summer days when so many 
girls would come from cities, all over the 
country, to rest and play, to laugh and sing, 
to ride, swim, tramp the forest paths, to 
grow strong and well after long, hard 
months of school-days. It passed along to 
Chop-an-Saw, Kowshicum, Moseley's Camp 
and Webb Falls and told them to prepare 
for the over-night campers from Teela- 
Wooket. 

All St. Nicholas girls who have been to The 
Teela-Wooket Camps remember the won- 
derful camping trips we have each summer. 
These are one of the greatest joys at Teela- 
Wooket. The lucky girls who are to go on 
any camping trip are all astir the day before 
making ready. Into duffle bags go blankets, 
ponchos and other necessities for a night or 
two out in the forest. 

The big day arrives. Bags, tents, cooking 
utensils are all loaded into a wagon and 
away goes Mr. Workman, the advance agent 
of all camping trips, to select the camping 
site, or prepare everything for the troop of 
campers who will come along later, warm, 
and hungry enough for two ordinary-sized 
meals. 

At last it is time for the impatient hikers 
to start. Two or three councillors go along 
to see that everything goes right. The 
camping outfit has been sent ahead so the 
hikers have no tiresome, heavy packs to 



SIXTH LETTER. 

weary their progress. They are free to en- 
joy every new view, to delve into the wooded 
mountain side for flowers or stop to pick the 
luscious raspberries. Sometimes a little 
rambling creek crosses their path. There is 
time to wade a little while in its coolness. 

Camp comes at last — a glad sight for tired 
bodies and hungry stomachs. Joy of joys! 
There is a fire going and a magnificent odor 
of food pervades the camp. Meal time is 
near and everyone eager for the call. The 
day has magic wings on a camping trip and 
night comes too soon. But night, too, brings 
its own particular share of pleasure. By the 
camp-fire gleam Mr. Workman tells the 
shivery story of "The Shin Bone," and 
yielding to the unanimous demand sings his 
ever popular "Lucky Jim." 

As the camp fire dies away, blankets are 
spread and the camp settles down for a 
night beneath a star-dotted sky. The whip- 
poor-wills sing a needless lullaby for the 
last waking moments. 

Such is a day and night of open air camp- 
ing. It is an experience that should be writ- 
ten on the pages of every girl's memory. We 
wish we could bring to every St. Nicholas 
girl the wonderful joys of these Teela- 
Wooket camping trips, and the pleasure of 
horseback riding along the trails, the morn- 
ing plunge before breakfast and all the 
other fun at camp. 

It is only a little while till we meet again 
in that summer wonderland. To all St. 
Nicholas girls who are thinking of the 
splendid weeks at Teela-Wooket we must 
send a warning. You should not put off 
telling us that you are coming. More girls, 
old friends and new, have inquired about 
The Teela-Wooket Camps this summer than 
ever before. Write to us at once for the 
1921 booklet which will show you some of 
the glories of this camp. Tell father and 
mother about our Camp Idlewild too for 
your brother. 

MR. and MRS. C. A. ROYS 

Cambridge, Mass. 




THE WONDERLAND CAMPS IN THE GREEN MOUNTAINS 



Summer Camps for (Jltrte— Continueb 




Kineowatha Camps for Girls 

Elisabeth Bass, B.A., Director 
Wilton, Maine 



CAMP KINEOWATHA 
Recreation, Girls 8 to 18 

An unusual camp for 
girls who seek quality 
and refinements in 
living conditions as well 
as "real camping" ex- 
perience. All sports 
and crafts. 

All possible safeguards. 
Experienced staff. 
Beautiful envi- 
ronment. 



Mention which camp 
is desired 



KINEOWATHA SCHOOL CAMP 
Tutoring, Older Girls 

Meets needs of girls pre- 
paring for college entrance 
examinations. Endorsed 
by leading women's col- 
leges. 

Ideal living conditions. 
Occupies most complete 
equipment of Abbott 
school at Farmington, Me. 
Week-end camping trips 
to Rangeley Moun- 
tains, etc. All sports. 



Mention tutoring 
needed 



Address IRVING U. McCOLL, Hotel McAlpin, New York 




Camp Cowasset 

North Falmouth, Mass., on Buzzards Bay, Cape 
Cod. The Seashore Camp for Girls. Senior and Junior 
camps. 

Seniors: Canoe and boat trips, use of fine saddle 
horses and best instruction without extra charge. Pageant, 
Water Carnival, tennis and games, gypsy trips, handi- 
crafts. First Aid and Camp Paper. 

Juniors: Salt watersports, careful oversight, freeriding 
and instruction, overnight hikes, nature study, tennis, 
basketball, baseball, volley ball, dramatized stories, good 
food, good fun and good care. 

Address MISS BEATRICE A. HUNT, Plymouth St. 
Holbrook, Mass. 





THE TALL PINES 



A Summer Camp for Girls 

Juniors 7-13. Seniors 13-18. Club over 18. 
On Lake George at Bennington, N. H., the camp nestles 
among the pines -as healthy a spot as can be found anywhere. 
Athletics, swimming, boating, canoeing, tennis, basket-ball 
Camping trips, mountain climbing. Folk dancing. Special oppor- 
tunity for horseback riding. Arts and crafts for rainy days. Good 
tood, well cooked, home care and attention. The Club accepts 
Campers for a week or longer. Catalog. Address 
MISS EVELINA REAVELEY, 12A Beacon St., Gloucester, Mass. 



NESHOBE 

A ™ {Clear Water) 



A Camp ^ 
For Girls 



On Fairlee Lake, So. Fairlee, Vt. 

100 Acres. Wonderful view. 80 rods water- 
front, sandy beach. Large and attractive main 
bungalow and sleeping bungalows. Tennis and 
basket-ball courts, athletic field, horseback rid- 
ing, hiking. Athletics, arts and crafts, water 
color sketching, taught by competent instructors. 
Careful personal supervision. 

Write for descriptive booklet 

and MRS. EDWARD G. OSGOOD 



MR, 



300 Chestnut St., Clinton, Mass. 



Massachusetts, Fairhaven. 

LITTLE BAY CAMP 

For Girls 

Most unique, up-to-date mammoth bungalow, modern con- 
veniences, sleeping porches. Water sports, horseback riding, 
arts and crafts. Health and safety first. Camp farm products.' 
Nothing but our illustrated catalogue can do it justice. Send for 
one to Mrs. P. C. Headley, Jr., Fairhaven, Mass. 



MIDDLEWEST CAMP for GIRLS 
— LAKE OKOBOJI, IOWA 



Camp Holiday 

Illustrated booklet on request. Address 
SARA G. HOLIDAY, BURLINGTON, IOWA 
After May I, Mllford, Iowa 




CAMP NAVA TO For Girls 7 - 15 y ears 

V "^ V1V11 rtHTHJU Rate $200-no extras 

July lsl lo September 1st 
On Beautiful Lake Thompson, Me. Near Poland Springs 

Mid pines and birches on hill sloping down to lake. Every lan.d 
and water sport carefully taught. Two-day White Mt. trip. 
Hikes to all points of interest. Best of food. Physician Nurs" 
Handicraft. Special arrangement for riding. Experienced coun- 
cillors. Catalog. Registrationcloses June 1. Clara Henderson 
Director. 1530 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 



Summer Camps: for <§trte— Conttnueb 



COME 
TO 



QJJ I N I B E C K tSm&Sg? 

ITS AIM ! To make Girls healthy and strong, happy and contented, self-reliant and self-restrained. 



For Information Address 
WILLIAM W. CLENDENIN, A.M. 
120 Vista Place Mt.Vernon, N %Xk, 




Vikginia, Bristol. 

CAMP JUNALUSKA 

One of the finest "all around" camps for girls in the south. Lake Juna- 
luska, N. C, the "Land of the Sty." Swimming, canoeing, mountain 
climbing, horseback riding, dancing, handcraft, music and dramatics, all 
under careful supervision. Write for booklet. 

Miss Ethel J. McCoy, Director, Virginia Intermont College, Bristol, Va. 




CAMP W1NNESHEWAUKA 

For Girls 
LUNENBURG, VERMONT 

In White Mountain region. Mile of lake 
shore. Free horseback riding, water and 
field sports, handicrafts, music and dancing 
under expert instructors. Sponson and war 
canoes. Screened bungalows. Spring and 
artesian well water. Perfect sanitation. Best 
of everything for the best girls. Booklet on 
request. 

Herbert F. Balch Dept. S St. Johnsbury, Vt. 



Connecticut. 

CAMP NEHANTIC FOR GIRLS 

An exclusive sea-shore camp. Salt water bathing, fishing, crabbing; 
land and water trips, athletic games and water sports. Experienced 
physical training director in charge at all times. Two months, $180. 
Booklet. Me. and Mrs. Harry Davison. 

5333 Rising Sun Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 



-2 



Camp Avalon 

On beautiful Lake Shaftsbury in the 
wilds of the Green Mountains. Found- 
ed on the Ideals of King Arthur. 

A girl's camp that is a happy, wholesome place with high 
standards and full round of land and water activities. A 
play or pageant given each summer. Riding a specialty. Fine 
string of saddle horses. Trails blazed to top of Taconic range. 
Overnight trips. Hiking. Camp crafts. Nature study. 
Swimming instruction and swimming meets with cup award. 

Camp comforts. Excellent living. 
An expert counsellor for each four 
girls. Three distinct groups — Jun- 
iors 7-12. Intermediates 12-15. 
Seniors 15- 19. 

Write for finely illustrated 
booklet. 



Prof, and Mrs. Richard D. Currier 




Summer Camps; for Girls'— Contmueb 




Th< 



QUANSET 

On Pleasant Bay, South Orleans, Mass. 

EXTENSIVE additions to acreage, buildings, r 
and equipment. Special opportunities lor 
salt water swimming, canoeing, sailinc;, tennis, 
dancing, team games. Horseback riding. Expert 
instruction and leadership. Red Cross Life Sav- , ( * 
ing Corps and board of examiners. Unusual ^Jp^Mri^ 
n suits in health and vigor. The same personal J**f f 
care and supervision by the directors. " - 
Separate camp for Quanset kiddies. * ' 

Mr. and Mrs. E. A. W. HAMMATT 
Box 1 
South Orleans, Mass. 



Cape Cod Camp 
For Girls 

Camp 



The Pioneer Salt Water 
Established 1905 



V. 



™1 
^ ^ 





For girls who love the woods, the hills and a rollicking good 
time iu the open. Camp Farwell girls know the joys of follow- 
ing trails, of the straw ride, of swimming, boating, horseback 
riding. Magnificent camp setting by mountain lake in pine 
woods. White Mountain views to East, Green Mts. to West, 
Bungalows, tents, electric lights, hot and cold running water.' 
Careful supervision. Illustrated Booklet. Until June 20 address 
Miss Hosalie P. Sandorlin, 2814-27ch Street, N. W., Washington D C 
After June 20, Wells lliver, Vt. 



New Hampshire, Portsmouth. 

CAMP BEAU RIVAGE 

French camp for girls. AU sports. Address Secretary, 

57 E. 74th St., New York City. 



THE WINNETASKA 
CANOEING CAMPS 




WE'RE OFF FOR A PADDLE ON THE LAKE, 

IN OUR GRAY CANOES SO TRIM; 
WE'LL CRUISE AMONG THE ISLANDS THERE, 

AND THEN WE'LL TAKE A SWIM; 
WE'LL COOK OUR LUNCH ON A SANDY BEACH, 

WE'LL COOK OUR SUPPER TOO; 
WE'LL PITCH OUR TENTS IN A SHADY GROVE — 

WE'RE A WINNETASKA CREW! 

WINNETASKA 

THE CANOEING CAMP FOR GIRLS 

SQUAM LAKE, ASHLAND, NEW HAMPSHIRE 
DR. and MRS. JOHN B. MAY 

BOX 1321 COHASSET, MASSACHUSETTS 



Wetomachek Camps for Girls 

Powers Lake, Wisconsin 




Under the management of The Chicago 
Normal School of Physical Education 

Junior and Senior Camps. July and August. 
For girls, ages 9 to 22. A strong force of 
trained counselors. References required. 

Write for Booklet 
Registrar, Box 18, 5026 Greenwood Ave., Chicago, III. 



Maine, Lin-e-kin Bay. 

LIN-E-KIN RAV PATVTP Ideal cam P for s irls cn 
t ^ WvBfl±* coast of Maine. Limited 

number. Personal care. Arts and crafts. Land and water sports; boat- 
ing; dramatics. Dancing; hikes and trips. For booklet, 

Mr. and Mrs. G. R. Branch, 65 Fruit Street, Worcester, Mass. 



New York, Star Lake, Adirondacks. 

CAMP HOH-WAH-TAH 6th season - The Frolic Camp 
,.„„, „ of the North Woods. Elev. 

1500 feet. Non-sectarian. Enrolment 100 girls (8 to 18 yrs). Special 
program and diet for juniors. Camp mother, trained nurse, 18 graduate 
counselors, all specialists. Screened open-air bungalows with electricity 
and running water. Modern sanitation. Junior playground; full equip- 
ment for all land and water sports. Horseback riding; woodcraft, life- 
saving, posture gymnastics, crafts, dramatics, glee ch'b, overnight trips. 
For booklet and details write or 'phone PROFESSOR and MRS. A. 
BLACK, 3905 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY. Telephone Wads- 
worth 50-15. 




CAMP ALLEGRO Silv N! H ute 

At the gateway of the White Mts. Tents among 
the pines. Spacious recreation building. New porch 
dining hall. Individual training by experts in land and 
water snorts. Tennis. Mountain climbing. Wood- 
craft. Nature lore. Music. Dramatics. Moderate 
terms. Write for illustrated booklet. 
Mrs. Blanche Carslens, 523 Washington Street, Brookline, Mass. 



Summer Camps for dltrlsi— Conttnueb 




amp 



The Island 
Camp for Girls 



econnet 

CHINA. MAINE 

Regular camp activities including land and 
water sports, over night trips, and horse- 
back riding. For booklet address 

Mr. and Mrs. C. F. TOWNE, Lasell Seminary 
122 Woodland Park, Auburndale, Mass. 



Wisconsin, Lake Snowdon, near Rhinelauder. 

CAMP BRYN AFON FOR GIRLS 

16,000 feet above sea level. Screened sleeping bungalows with hard 
wood floors; saddle horses; athletic fields; craft house; infirmary. All 
land and water sports. Faculty composed of 15 college graduates, 
each one a specialist. For illustrated booklet write to 
MISS Lotta B. Broadbridge, 700 West Euclid Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Massachusetts, West Springfield. 

CATV/TP VOTCTTlVr For Girls. Situated on the shore of a 
\^rt.iv±jr x uiv u ivi beautiful lake almoat at cre3t of Berkshire 

Hills. Altitude 1875 ft. Best of instructors, attractive responsible coun- 
cillors. Term seven weeks. $200 includes everything except tutoring and 
horseback. Mart E. Richardson, 69 Woodmont Street. 



Trail's End 



The Kentucky 
Camp for Girls 



Write for Booklet. 
MISS SNYDER, 364 S. Broadway, Lexington, Ky. 



(amp(otuit 



For girls of 9 to 20. Beauti- 
ful location on Cape Cod with 
fresh and salt water bathing. 
Horseback riding, tennis, canoe- 
ing, all field sports and games. 
Swimming taught by experts on 
delightful beach. Girls swim not 
only for pleasure bjt for strength 
and health building. Tutoring 
if desired. Catalog. Address 

Miss Emma L. Schumacher 
Care Miss Beard's School 
Orange, N. J. 



SUMMER CAMP 

and 

TUTORING SCHOOL 

Address MISS LAURA S. GILDNER, A.M., Director 
Princeton, N. J. 

sc o? OL FOUR SEASONS G ^ s 

57 acres, lake, sleeping porches, formal gardens; farm. 
Athletics, dancing, tennis, riding, swimming. Tutoring, 
college preparatory. Instruction in floral culture, farm- 
ing, dairying. Separate cottage for Juniors. 



for 



CHINQUEKA CAMP c s 

Among the Litchfield Hills 



A healthy, happy, helpful vacation place for 
thirty girls . 8 to 14, under home influences. 
Woods, fields and lake at 1000 ft. elevation. 
Laud and water sports. Careful training; 
sympathetic comradeEhip. Tents, lodge, cot- 
tage with modern plumbing. Abundant table 
with farm and dairy products. Moderate 
rates. Booklet. 
David Layton, Director, 669 Dawson St., New York City 



On 
Bantam 
Lake 
Conn. 



Summer Camps for <§irte— Continue* 




On Sebago Lake, South Casco, Maine 
MRS. CHARLOTTE V. GULICK 

Hotel Hemenway Boston, Mass. 




ONEKA 

The Pennsylvania 
Camps for. Girls 

Junior and Senior Caraps on crystal 
clear Lake Arthur in the heart of 
the Poconos. Elevation 'J, 200 feet. 

Outdoor life. LaBting friendships. 

Rustic bungalows and tents on 
lake shore. SPLENDID EQUIP- 
MENT for every land and water 
sport. Athletic Field ; Horseback 
Riding; Gypsy Trips; Handicrafts; 
Dramatics; Pageantry; Music. 

Outdoor Woodcraft Council. 

Cultivation of personality and self- 
reliance. 14 seasons and not an ac- 
cident. Mr. and Mrs. Sipple give 
their close personal care to each 
girl Send for illustrated booklet. 
MR. and MRS. E. W. SIPPLE 
Directors 
3o0 W. Duval St., Germantown 
Phila., Pa. 



Maine, Monmouth. 

CAMP MINNETONKA a*;®* a thousand feet 

of lake frontage in one of 
nature s beauty spots. Bungalows and tents. No fogs. Canoeing, swim- 
ming, tennis, etc. Every camp comfort and pleasure. Personal attention 
Booklet. Geo. W. Rieger, Jr., Principal. Northeast School. 

5th and Race Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Camp Idyle Wyld Invites You ! 

Have you seen its booklet? A TRUE GIRLS' WONDERLAND! 
Limited numbers. Only a few vacancies. References required. 
Season's fees, $500.00. No extras. 

The Director, Three Lakes, Wisconsin 



Sargent Camps 

PETERBORO, N. H. 

The Athletic Camps for Girls 



Every activity, every hour of 
play has its purpose in helping 
the girl toward healthy, happy 
life. Skilled leaders train the 
Sargent Camps girls to excel in 
all sports. Woodcraft, water 
sports, hiking, horseback rid- 
ing, field gamei, pantomime, 
music and dancing. 

Junior Camp. Homecraft for 
little folks. A happy combina- 
tionof home-making and play 
in large play houses. 

For illustrated catalogue ad- 
dress Camp Secretary, S Everett 
Street, Cambridge, Mass. 




Wisconsin, Green Lake. 

SANDSTONE CAMPS 

Three camps, 150 girls, ages 8 to 22. Season eight weeks. $325. Tenth 
season - Miss Esther G. Cochrane, 

3722 Pine Grove Ave., Chicago. 

Minnesota, Cass Lake. 

KAWA TI WIN A f amp for girls ftmo °B the pines on famous Star 
, , " Island. All land and water sports; screened 

porches for sleeping quarters; library; war canoes; canoe trips- wonder- 
ful beach. Only extras, French and tutoring. Sixth season, June 18 to 
August 27. For illustrated book, address. 

Miss Winnifred Schureman, 1780 Lyndale Avenue South, 

Minneapolis, Minnesota. 




Camp 
Quinipet 

Shelter Island, N. Y. 




A Salt Water Camp for Girls 

Eastern end of Long Island, One Mile of 
Water Front. 100 Miles from New York. 

100 Miles from Boston. 
Quickly reached by train or motor car 

GIRLS OF ALL AGES, but separate camp for younger girls, 
each with complete equipment of canoes, boats and newly devised 
bungalow- tents. Modern sanitation. Frequent surf-bathing trips to 
Amagansett Beach. 

Adjoining camp for older people, single men excepted. Live in large, handsome 
cottages, or in tents. Unusual opportunity for those at a loss to know where to spend 
vacations or week-ends. Use of boats, instruction in swimming, rowing, canoeing, 
sailing, and managing motorboats free. 

Myron T. Scudder, of the Scudder School, New York, President. Lester H. 
Clee, Vice President. Address: 



MISS 
244 W. 72nd Street 



S. N. SCUDDER, Registrar 



New York City 



Summer Camps for <§irte— Continued 



SILVER LAKE CAMPS ADIRONDACK^ 




Separate Camps for Juniors and Seniors 

ALL sports including swimming, 
fx. canoeing, baseball, basket-ball, 
tennis, horseback riding taught by ex- 
perts. Jewelry work. Graduate nurse. 
Sleeping porches. Open-air dining 
room. For illustrated booklet address: 

Director, Silver Lake Camps, 

Bradford Academy, Bradford, Mass., or 

Secretary, Silver Lake Camps, 

Apt. 6 F, 59 Livingston St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Tel. 8688 Main 



Camp Wuttaunoh 

Canaan, New Hampshire 



• ■ 1 mm 



Why do more than 
62% of Wuttaunoh 
girls return? 

It's the horses, the 
swims, the hikes, the 
games, the good will, the 
helpfulness, the friend- 
ships and the place, they 
just can't help it. 

We can admit about 
twenty-five new Wuttau- 
noh girls this year. 

Catalog 

and Mrs. Ethan Allen Shaw 

Northfield, Vermont 



New Hampshire, New London, on Lake Pleasant. 

Real Camp 

Life. Tents, Sleeping Shacks, Main Bungalow, Trained Leaders. 
Music, Crafts, Sports, Nature Study. For booklet, address, 
MISS Florence E. Griswold, 313 Hope St., Providence, E. I. 




EGGEMOGGIN CAMP FOR GIRLS 

New Meadows Bay, East Harpswell, Maine 

Ages 8-20. Limited to 40. Seventh season. Early enrollment 
necessary. All land and water sports under trained supervisors. 

Horseback riding free 
Tuition $300. No extras except laundry. Write for illustrated booklet. 

MR. AND MRS. EDWARD L. MONTGOMERY, Directors 
Mount Ida School for Girls Newton, Mass. 





WINNEMONT 



A Camp for Girls 



On Lake Ossipee. in the foothills of the White Mountains. Special 
attention to happiness, health, and safety. Automobile trips to our 
White Mountain Camp. Canoeing, swimming, sailing, horseback 
riding archery, and all sports. For illustrated booklet address 
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Bsnlley, Elinor C. Barta. 
Room 305, 14 Beacon Si., Boston, Mass. 



Massachusetts, Orleans, Cape Cod. 

Mrs. Norman White's Camp for Girls 

A Seaside Camp in the pines. All pleasures of life by the sea. Outdoor 
sleeping in well-protected cabins. Limited membership. 

Mrs. Norman White, 
Tel. Morningside 3350. 424 West 119th Street, New York City. 




CAMP TEGAWITHA 

FOR GIRLS 
MT. POCONO, PA. 

An ideal camp in an ideal location in the famous Pocono 
Mountains — 2000 feet above sea level. Electric light, 
hot tub and shower baths. All land and water sports, horse- 
back riding, tramping, nature study, arts and crafts, Eng- 
lish reading. Resident physician. Experienced counselors. 
Wholesome, well prepared food and pure water. Health 
and safety given first consideration. For booklet address 
MISS MARY ANGELA LYNCH Mt. Pocono, Pa. 



Summer Camps for (girte— Continurt 




ROMANY CAMP 

At Woodstock, Conn. 

The Place for a Girl— 7 to 18 



Planned for the wisest development of girls. Healthy 
happy growth m the open-air, woodsy country. Swim- 
ming, hiking, horseback riding and all outdoor sports 
under expert supervision. Roomy, comfortable sleeping 
and hying lodges. Good, plentiful food. Ideal location, 
easy of access. Catalogue. 

STANLEY KELLEY Pomfret, Conn. 



Pennsylvania, Pocono Mountains. 

PINE TREE CAMP FOR GIRLS 

On beautiful Naomi Lake, 2000 feet above the sea, in pine-laden air of 
Fooono Mountains. Four hours from New York and Philadelphia 
Bungalows and tents on sunny hill. Experienced councilors. Horseback 
riding, tennis, baseball, canoeing, "hikes"— all outdoor sports. Handi- 
crafts, gardening. 10th season. 

Miss Blanche D. Price, 404 W. School Lane, Philadelphia, Pa. 




Camp Owaissa 

On Indian Lake, Adirondack.- 

With all the delights of water, mountains and 
woodland — the place for a girl who wishes to be 
a real camper. Post office, Sabael, N. Y. For 
Booklet, address 

Miss Sallie E. Wilson, Box S 

National Cathedral School, Washington, D. C. 



CAMP CHEQUESSET 



1 


7 

s 


"-!,._.,'— .■■'-4 


■ftffinii'^ii mi," & i, itaiteL^, 

1 - -*^'?*$8isSK^ 




Hiss Alice II. Fielding. A.B., 
Box 18, Randolph Macon Worn- 



The Nautical Camp 

for Girls 
OntheTipof CapeCod 

All the fun of life in and 
on the roaring Atlantic. 
Wood lore, arts and crafts, 
scouting, camp crafts. All 
field sportG. 

Ileal sailing with a skilled 
sea captain. Special (rips 
around Pilgrim land. 

Aquaplaning, motor 
boating, swimming, fish- 
ing. Bungalows. Each girl 
always in the care of an 
expert. A councilor for 
every three girls. Write 
for illustrated booklet. 

Wm. G. Vinal, A.M., 
>x 25, R. 1. College of Edu- 
cation, Providence, R. I. 



ST. NICHOLAS CAMP EDITOR 
353 Fourth Avenue, New York City 

Please have information about camps sent to me. 

My age is Location desired 

Large or small camp 

Name of camp I have attended 

Name __ 

Address _ 



Parent's Signature. 



New York, Adirondack Mountains. 
CAMP CRT) AT? A select camp for girls on beau- 
„ - „ /4 - K - tiful Schroon Lake. Land and 
water sports. Excellent bathing beach; safe conoeing; ex- 
penenced councilors; home atmosphere. First class table. 
Illustrated book. 

Miss A. Fox, Director, 324 Preston St., Philadelphia, Pa 
orMlss A. BEENKOPF. 503 W. 121st St., N. Y. City. 

Michigan, Detroit. 

VAGABONDIA 

A call to the mystery and delight of woods. A place of wholesome 
camaraderie. A stimulus to simple and joyous living. A mountain camp 
tor girls, limited in number. Booklet. Address Florence M. Eis 938 
Delaware Ave., Detroit, or Emily McClure, 7 Glenada PI., Brooklyn. 
Long Island, Bellport. — — — 

CAMP GRANGE 

Under the direction of experienced Directress and Counselors. Limited 
to fatty girls, 5-14 years. Fifty acres. All sports, ocean and still water 
bathing. iVor catalogue address Miss C. B. Hagedorn 606 West 
137th Street, New York City. 




PATHFINDERS' LODGE 

A Woodland Camp for Girls 

On Lake Otsego, Cooperstown, N. Y. 



With unusual 
opportunities 
for 

study of art and 
music. 



W, itc fur Illustrated Booklet 
MISS VALERIE DEUSHER, 

Cooperstown, N. Y. 

MRS. DOUGLAS BASNET, 

237 W. 74th Street. New York City 



The Hanoum Camps 

FOR GIRLS 
THETFORD, VERMONT 

Hill Camp for girls under 15 — Lake Camps for those 
over 15. Swimming, canoeing, and all water sports on our 
own lake. Riding, Gypsy trips. 
Our girls go home strong in body, 
mentally alert, and inspired with 
the highest ideals. 13th year. 
Illustrated booklet. 

PROFESSOR and MRS. C. H. 

FARNSWORTH 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 
New York City, N. Y. 

All counsellor positions filled. 




Summer Campg for (§ttte— Contirmeb 




CAMP ABENA for GIRLS 

BELGRADE LAKES, MAINE 

Junior and Senior Groups. 15th Season. Illustrated booklet. 

MISS HORTENSE HERSOM, Oaksmere, Mamaroneck, N. Y. 



CAMP 
A R E Y 

Lake Keuka 
NEW YORK 

On the loveliest lake 
in New York. Wonder- 
ful swimming, hikes, 
ramping trips, war 
canoes, Bmall canoes, 
Competitive athletics, 
baseball, basket-ball, 
field hockey, outdoor 
dancing, weekly shows 
and parties, camp 
paper. Limited enroll- 
ment. The camp where 
abound, spirit, health 
and happiness. 

MRS. A. FONTAINE 
713 Eastern Parkway 
Brooklyn - - N. Y. 




Summer Camps! for Jlopg anb #trte 



"The Call to Camp" 

— our 192 1 catalog; pictures, describes, and 
prices our popular 

Dudley Line of Camping 
Essentials and Accessories 

We are official Outfitters to nearly 100 
camps. Every Dudley product is positively 
guaranteed as to workmanship and quality. 
All orders quickly and carefully filled. 

Write today for your copy of 
"The Call to Camp" — sent free 

CHARLES H. DUDLEY, Inc. 




Hanover 

New Hampshire 



Dept. B 



Little Bldg. 
Boston, Mass. 



MACH-A-WA-MACH 

The Children's Camp Catskill-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

The old Van Vechten estate at Catskill has been converted into 
a charming summer home for girls 3 to 14 years and boys 3 to 10. 
Camp limited to SO; councilor for every 4. Complete equipment; 
boating and all suitable sports. Folk and "baby" dances, pageant- 
ry. Military training for boys. Grace T. Lapham, Director. 

The Mothers' Helper and Elementary School 

870 Riverside Drive, (160th Street) N. Y. Tel., Audubon 435 



BEACON 

Separate Camps for Juniors and Seniors 

Hillsview for Boys 
Hillcrest for Girls 

15 miles from Boston in the 
Blue Hill region. 65 acres 
of athletic fields, farms and 
woodland. All land and wa- 
ter sports. Horseback riding. 
Music and art are a vital part 
of camp life for all campers. 
Tutoring, Dancing, panto- 
mime and indoor games. / 
Hikes, trips to the ocean. 
Under the direction of Bea- k&g 
con School. Address 




MRS. ALTHEA H. 
1440 Beacon Street 



ANDREW, Director 

Brookline, Mass. 



New York, Cragsmoor. 

CAMP BLUEBIRD 

For the smaller children, a happy, herlthy summer, on a moun- 
tain top, ur.der the care of a real mother. Pony rides, picr.ics, 
bathing, hay-ride3. No tents. Individual, expert, loving care. 

Mbs. C. G. Wright, 

P. O. Box 75, Ambler, Pa. 



For Every Girl 
SUMMER IN THE GIRLS' CAMP 

By Anna Worthington Coale 

EVERYTHING you need to enable you to fit in comfortably at 
once, understand everything, and be ready for all the activities 
and customs of camps. The author has made it as interesting to 
read as a good story. 

THE CENTURY CO. , 353 Fourth Ave., New York City 

Who Goes to Her First Camp 

This Summer 



Price $1.75 

Profusely illustrated 
with photographs of 
actual camp activi- 
ties. At all book- 
stores. 



ffl 





BEACON 

A Country-City Boarding and Day School 

For Boys and Girls of All Ages 

Distinctly college preparatory, covering all 
grades from kindergarten to college. Special 
diploma courses for students not wishing to 
enter college. Household Arts, Music, Art, Sec- 
retarial and Business Courses. Faculty of ex- 
perienced college graduates. 3-acre estate with 
S buildings in Boston's most beautiful suburb. 
8s acres and 5 buildings in the Blue Hill region, 
15 miles from Boston. Hillsview, the school's 
summer camp, is used for week end sports and 
games. For catalog address 

MRS. ALTHEA H. ANDREW, Principal 
1440 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 




Massachusetts, Bradford. 

THE JUNIOR ACADEMY 

A preparatory School for Bradford Academy— Early application advisable. 
For further information, address 

The Secretary, The Junior Academy. 




The Ely School for Girls 

ELY COURT 
GREENWICH CONNECTICUT 

In the country, one hour from 
New York City. Twenty-five 
acres, modern equipment. Col- 
lege Preparatory, General, Sec- 
retarial and Post-Graduate 
Courses. Music. Household arts. 
Daily work in the studio. Horse- 
back riding and all summer and 
winter sports. Sleeping Porch. 




Stamford Military Academy 

A preparatory school that pursues sound educational methods 
and provides a thorough training for mind and body. Located at 
Ossining overlooking the Hudson, convenient to New York, the 
situation is ideal. Classes are purposely small and students are 
assured individual consideration from every teacher. The 
locality permits every kind of outdoor sport and the gymnasium 
is well equipped for all indoor exercise. Summer Camp. For 
catalog address 

WALTER D. GERKEN, A.M., Principal 

Ossining, New York 



Wflltin0 A Countr y Home School for Girls 

* * _~~ 55 f ?" om ei sht to sixteen, affiliated with the best preparatory schools. Twen 



Hall 



from eight to sixteen, affiliated with the best preparatory schools. Twenty- 
six acres, new buildings, ideal location, high elevation — halfway between 
Boston and Worcester, near Longfellow's Wayside Inn. Outdoor sleeping 
and class rooms, if desired. Individual care. Teachers for all branches. 
Mistress of field games. House mother. Family life emphasized. 
MR. ELBRIDGE C. WHITING, Amherst, Yale, MRS. WHITING, Wellesley, Prim. 
12 CONCORD ROAD, SOUTH SUDBURY, MASS. 




Hkfjools: for Pops anb <§trte— Conrmueb 




TENACRE 



A Country School for Young Girls 
from Ten to Fourteen Years of A ge 

PREPARATORY to Dana Hall. 
Fourteen miles from Boston. All 
sports and athletics supervised and 
adapted to the age of the pupil. The 
finest instruction, care and influence. 

Miss Helen Temple Cooke 

Dana Hall, Wellesley, Mass. 



lobe „ ft 




Miss Mason's Summer School 

This well-known school is offering exceptional coursesfor summer 
work. The ideal location affords a splendid opportunity for recrea- 
tion and study. Beautiful and historical Tarrytown is a wonderful 
place for a summer vacation. On the Hudson river, 45 minutes 
from Fifth Avenue. Fine courses in Secretarial work. Business 
Methods for Women, Music, Art, Dancing and Authorship. Em- 
phasis placed on tutoring for college entrance. Catalogue for 
summer or regular winter school sent on request. 

Address Box 725 
For Girls and Women Tarrytown-on-Hudson, N. Y. 



Massachusetts, South Byfield. 

DUMMER ACADEMY 

A preparatory school for a limited number of selected boys. Ideal 
country location. Moderate fees. International reputation. 159th year 
opens September 20. 



CRESTALBAN 



Massachusetts, Berkshire. 

A school for little girls in the invigorating 
climate of the Berkshires. Thirty minutes 
from Pittsfield. 200 acres, 3 buildings. Number limited. Special care 
given to home training, character development, and health. Open air 
classes. Outdoor sports. Miss Margery Whiting, Principal, Berk- 
shire, Mass. 



New Jersey, Orange. 

MISS BEARD'S SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

A country school, 13 miles from New York. College preparatory, special 
courses. Music, Art, Domestic Arts and Science. Supervised physical 
work in gymnasium and field. Catalog on request. 

Address Miss Lucie C. Beard. 




Southf ield Point Hall 

A School for Girls. Beautifully situated on Long Island Sound at 
Southfield Point. Intermediate, general, and college preparatory 
courses. Music, gymnastics, athletics, andsports. Horseback riding, 
skating, skiing, 52 minutes from Graud Ceutral Station, New York. 
Limited enrollment. 

JESSIE CALLAM GRAY, B. A., Principal 
BERNICE TOWNSEND PORTER, Assistant Principal 
10 Davenport Drive, Stamford, Conn. 



EASTFORD 

The School 
for a Boy 

For the development of manly boys 
into good citizens — leaders of men, by 
a rational system of training mind, 
morals and body. Work, self-respon- 
sibility, a clean, healthy body and a 
vigorous, well-balanced mind belong 
to Eastford boys. College preparation 
or vocational training. Catalogue. 

STANLEY KELLE Y, Director 

Pomfret, Conn. 





A Famous Old New England Country School 

Twenty-five miles from Boston. College Preparation. General Courses. Domestic Science and 
Home Management. Strong courses in instrumental and vocal music. Modern Languages. 
The school, home and gymnasium are each in separate buildings. Large new sleeping porch. 
Fine new Y.W.C. A. swimming pool. Military drill, horseback riding, excellent canoeing, trips 
afield. Extensive grounds. All sports. Live teachers. Upper and lower school. SO pupils. 
Catalog. Address 

MR. and MRS. C. P. KENDALL, Principals, 28 Howard Street, West Bridgewater, Mass. 



#s>c!)00ls; for ^lopsf anb <§trte— Contt'nueb 




The Hedges 

NORTON, MASS. 

The Junior School of House in the Pines. 30 miles from Bos- 
ton. For girls under fourteen. A large, modern home. Sun 
parlors for class rooms. Play fields. Horseback riding. 
Swimming. A wholesome, simple life of study and play 
that makes the child quick to feel, anxious to know, able to do 
MISS GERTRUDE E. CORNISH, Principal 




PAGE 

MILITARY ACADEMY 

A Big School for Little Boys 
Military life appeals to youngsters — 
at Page it is combined with work and 
play that develop initiative and self- 
reliance. The growing mind is guided by 
wise men and women who thoroughly 
understand boys. Every advantage of 
climate and location. Large modern 
buildings; seven acre campus. Let our 
catalog tell you all about us. Soys 
grow big and strong in California. 

ROBERT A. GIBBS, Headmaster 

Route 7, Box 947 
LOS ANGELES CALIFORNIA 



New York, Ossining-on-Hudson. 

OSSINING SCHOOL 

For Girls. 53rd year. 30 miles from New York. Academic and economic 
courses. Separate school for very young girls. For catalog address 
Clara C. I-uller, Principal, Box 5-N. 



Pennsylvania, Swarthmore. 

THE MARY LYON SCHOOL ^JSSj'gS 

College Preparatory, Certificate privileges. General and Finishing 
Courses. Opportunity for advanced stud v. Open-air claseiooms 
SEVEN GABLES, our J tin ior School for girlx'6 to 1 f. U. M. CB1ST, A.B 
FRANCES L. CRIST, A.li., Principals, Bos 1512, Swarthmore, Pa. 



Woodland Park 

Junior Department of Lasell Seminary 
For Girls under 15 

A course of study covering all gram- 
mar grades, fitting girls for Lasell 
Seminary and other secondary schools. 
Buildings splendidly equipped for the 
needs and comforts of young people. 
Glass-enclosed sun-parldrs and class- 
rooms. Gymnasium and swimming 
pool. Playgrounds for all activities. 
Catalog on application. 

Camp Teconnet opens July 1st. 
GUY M. WINSLOW, Ph.D., 
Principal 
CHAS. F. TOWNE, A.M., 
Assoc. Principal 
Woodland Road 
Auburndale Massachusetts 




PEDDIE 

An Endowed School for Boys 

Peddie graduates are now leaders in scholar- 
ship and student activities in 26 colleges 
They learned the right way of doing the right 
things at Peddie. The preparatory courses at 
Peddie meet the requirements of the best 
colleges or universities. Athletics and out- 
door sports for every student. The heallhv 
body for tho clean, vigorous mind. Swimmin" 
pool, large gymnasium, 60-acre campus. Lower 
school for boys under 14. Summer Session 
July 11 to September 2. For booklets, address 
ROGER W. SWETLAND, LLD. 
Headmaster 
B< "= 5-M Hightstown, N. J. 



FARMINGTON 




MAINE 



Abbott School 

"The boy at Abbott lives" 

Athletics on a field that would be a credit to 
any college. Hiking, camping, snowshoeing, 
skiing, a winter carnival. 

Small classes insure rapid and thorough work. 
Prepares for business but emphasizes college 
preparation. 

Modern methods with old-fashioned thor- 
oughness. 

Fall term opens September 28th. 

Catalog on request. 
MOSES BRADSTREET PERKINS, Headmaster 



Pennsylvania, Lancaster. 

Franklin and Marshall Academy 

Prepares boys for all Colleges and Technical Schools. Complete modern 
Equipment and good Physical Training Department. Old established 
School on basis allowing moderate terms. Catalogue on request. 

Address E. M. Hartman, Principal, Box 432, Lancaster, Pa. 



Pennsylvania, Bryn Mawr. 

THE BALDWIN SCHOOL 

A Country School for Girls. 
Elizabeth Forrest Johnson, A.B., Head of School. 



NationalParkSeminary 

for Young Women, Washington, D. C. Suburbs 
JAMES E. AMENT, Ph. D., LL D.. President 
Presents the fundamentals of a college education in a two- 
year diploma course. Mu6ic, Art, Expression, Domestic Sci- 
ence and otner vocational courses. Athletics, Gymnasium, 
swimming pool, outdoor 6ports, riding. 18 minutes from 
■Washington, D.C. Thirty-two buildings on an eighty-five acre 
campus make a home where cultured environment, healthy 
surroundiugs, and democratic ideals mould the well-bred girl 
of today into the comprehensive woman of tomorrow. An 
early enrollment is urged. Catalogue. Address 

Bogistrar, Box lfw. Forest Glen, Maryland 




gktjoolS for poj>g anb <§trte— Continueb 




The Mitchell Military Boys School 

A school that appeals to the young American boy and the dis- 
criminating parent. Exponents of clean sport, fair play, and 
thorough work. Development and maintenance of health con- 
sidered of first importance. Military training adapted to the 
age of our boys. Preparatory to larger secondary schools. 
Equipment modern and complete. 100 acres. 
ALEXANDER H. MITCHELL, Principal, Box S, Billerica, Mass. 



Miss Hall's 

SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

In the Berkshire Hills, on 
the Holmes Road to Lenox. 
Forty-five acres. One thou- 
sand feet above the sea level. 



Miss MIRA H. HALL, Principal 
Pittsfield, Massachusetts 



Connecticut, Cornwall. 

RUMSEY HALL 

A School for Boys under 15. Yearly rate $1200. 

L. R. Sanford, Principal. 

Louis H. Schutte, M.A., Headmaster. 



Rhode Island, Providence. 

The Mary C. Wheeler Town and Country School 

A town school offering opportunities for country life and 
sports. 

ProvidiInce, Rhode Island. 



School Service for St. Nicholas Readers 



This department is maintained for the benefit 
of our readers. It helps parents in the selec- 
tion of the proper schools for their sons and 
daughters, always remaining conscious of the 
particular needs of each pupil. 

There are a number of excellent schools 
advertising in these columns, but if you are 
perplexed and do not know which to choose, 
we will gladly advise you without charge. 

Give as much information as possible when writing. Address 
SCHOOL SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

ST. NICHOLAS MAGAZINE 

353 4th Avenue New York City 

llUilllluaiiliiiiiiiitiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiuniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiruiliNiiiiiiiiiiiiini 




Allen Military School 

A country, college preparatory school, 9 miles from Boston. 
The group system prevails. Gymnasium, swimming pool, con- 
crete rink, and three athletic fields. Upper and Lower Schools. 

THOMAS CHALMERS, A.B., D.D., Direclor 
Portsmouth Military School Under Same Management 
437 WALTHAM ST., WEST NEWTON, MASS. 




HILLSIDE 

College preparatory and special courses. Normal 
living in right environment. Every comfort. All 
healthful activities. Gymnasium. Catalog. 

Margaret R. Brendlinger, A.B. Vassar 
Vida Hunt Francis, A.B. Smith, Principals 



SCHOOL FOR GIFLS 
Norwalk, Connecticut 




Powder Point School 

Will Understand Your Boy 

—and help him to understand himself. Thorough in- 
struction. Clean, snappy athletics for 
every hoy. Clearest understanding be- 
tween boys and masters. Prepares for 
college and gives strong gen- 
eral course. Ages 10 to 19. 
Number limited to sixty. 
Boys must furnish evidence 
of good character. Unique 
location on seashore. Con- 
venient to Boston. Address 

RALPH K. BEARCE, A.M. 
Headmaster 
27 King Caesar Road 
Duxbury, Mass. 



Connecticut, Stamford. 

MASSEE COUNTRY SCHOOL g^** gjjja 

ration for college and scientific school. Junior Department for boys over 7. 
One teacher to 12 boys. Attractive buildings. Beautiful 15-acre campus. 
All sports. W. W. Massee, Ph.D., Box 500, Stamford, Conn. 

Unclassifteb 





"STAMMERING 



its Cause ej\d (\ire 



9* 



You can be quickly cured if you stammer. Send 10 cents, com 
or stamps, tor 288 page cloth bound book on Stammering and 
Stuttering. It tells how I cured myself after Stammering and 
Sti'Uering for 20 years. BENJAMIN N. BOGUE 
i 178 Bogue Building, 1147 N. III. St. Indianapohsj 





IU 



erun 





y <JLLver Ware 



The Gorkam Inleresls 
The Siiversmiiks o^Amertca 

Uie Gorkam Co. 
cling Afanu/acluring Co. 
Wm.B. Durgin Co. 
Wm. B. Kerr Co. 




578 



Library, Urn v. of 
North Carolina 



ST. NICHOLAS 



Vol. XLVIII 



MAY, 1921 

Copyright, 1921, by The Century Co. All rights reserved. 



No. 7 




i ll I .Jjr" \ , 



CAUGHT IN THE ACT 



HENRY ROSS V>- ^ — 



By 




' NE fine May morning about seventy years 
ago a little French boot-black was 
standing at the entrance of the Pont 
Neuf, one of the finest of the many 
bridges that cross the Seine between the two great 
divisions of Paris. 

The boy was watching for customers, but there 
was none to be had yet, for it was too early. At 
length, finding nothing else to do, he took a piece 
of chalk from the one untorn pocket that he 
possessed and began to sketch a face upon the 
stone parapet of the bridge. 

A strange face it was, very broad across the 
jaws, and narrowing as it sloped upward, so that, 
with its curious shape and the pointed tuft of hair 
that stood up from the high, narrow forehead, it 
looked at a little distance like an enormous pear. 
But it was plain that this was the likeness of some 
real man, and that the boy was immensely amused 
at it, for he chuckled to himself all the time he 
was working, and more than once laughed out- 
right. 

So intent was he on his picture, which was now 
nearly finished, as to be unconscious that some 
one else was much interested in it, too. 

A stout, gray-haired old gentleman, very 
plainly dressed in a faded brown coat and shabby 
hat, and carrying a cotton umbrella under his 



arm, had come softly across the road, slipped up 
behind the young artist, and was looking at the 
pearlike face on the wall with a grin of silent 
amusement. 

And well he might, for, strange to say, his own 
face was the very image of that which the boy 
was sketching so eagerly. The queer, pear- 
shaped head, the large heavy features, the tuft 
of hair on the forehead, and even the sly expres- 
sion of the small, half-shut eyes, were alike in 
every point. Had the little artist not had his 
back turned, one might have thought that he was 
drawing this old man's portrait from life. 

But just as the boy was in the height oi his 
abstraction, and the single looker-on in the height 
of his enjoyment, the old gentleman happened to 
sneeze suddenly, and the sketcher turned around 
with a start. The moment he caught sight of 
the old fellow standing behind him he uttered a 
faint cry of terror and staggered back against 
the wall, looking frightened out of his wits. 

"The king!" he muttered, in a stifled tone, as 
if the words choked him. 

"The king, at your service," answered the old 
gentleman, who was indeed no other than King 
Louis Philippe of France. "It seems that I have 
come up just in time to serve as a model. Go on, 
pray; don't let me interrupt you!" 



579 



580 



THE PINCH-HITTER 



The boy's first impulse was to take to his heels 
at once; but there was a kindly twinkle in the 
king's small gray eyes which gave him courage, 
and looking slyly from the pearlike head to the 
royal model, he said, "Well, your Majesty, I 
did n't mean to make fun of you ; but it is like you 
— is n't it now?" 

"Very like indeed," said the king, laughing; 
"and I only wish the pears in my garden would 
grow half as big as that one of yours. However, 
I 'm afraid I have n't time to stand still and be 



sketched just now, so I '11 give you a likeness of 
myself" — putting a gold twenty-franc piece 
(which was stamped with the king's head) into 
the boy's brown hand — " to copy at your leisure." 

There was in Paris a few years ago an old French 
portrait-painter who told his friends and patrons 
that the first portrait for which he had ever been 
paid was that of King Louis Philippe himself, 
and he declares that "the old gentleman was not 
such a bad fellow, after all." 



THE PINCH-HITTER 

By RALPH HENRY BARBOUR 



Jerry Benson took the path to the ball-field, his 
hands in the pockets of his trousers, his last year's 
straw hat tilted back on his tow-colored head, 
and a contented smile on his likable, homely 
countenance. The smile was there because he 
had just finished an examination and was con- 
scious of having done extremely well, all things 
considered. The June morning was blue and 
sparkling, too, and there was a quality in the air 
(hat reminded Jerry of his own beloved North 
Carolina hills. 

Final examinations, he reflected, had one merit 
at least — they offered spare hours which, unless 
required for "digging," in preparation for the 
succeeding ordeal, might be spent out of doors to 
the profit of one's soul and one's batting average. 
Just now it was his batting average that concerned 
him more than his soul, for, with the first of the 
Cumbridge Hall series but a few days distant, the 
order had gone, forth for morning practice at the 
batting-net, and Jerry, substitute center-fielder 
and pinch-hitter, was on his way thither. 

When he reached the field, only the coach was 
on hand. Mr. Keegan was .sitting on the bench 
along the first-base stand in the early sunlight, 
his hands thrust in the pockets of a disreputable 
brown sweater and his gaze fixed in contemplative 
serenity on the toes of his scuffed shoes. Seen in 
that attitude, he was somewhat of a surprise to 
Jerry, for never before had the latter seen the 
coach really quiet! Observing that, although 
bats and other paraphernalia lay ready, none of 
the pitchers were there, he was minded to turn 
back or wander on toward the road. But at that 
moment Mr. Keegan glanced up and saw him, 
so Jerry kept on. 

"Have to wait awhile, Benson," said the coach. 



"Train was to be here, but he has n't shown up 
yet. Guess he will be along soon, though. How 
are you getting along with finals?" 

"Right well, I reckon," said Jerry. "I mean, 
I reckon I '11 pass all right. Course, I ain't been 
here very long and — and it 's sort of hard." 

"You entered in January, did n't you?" asked 
the coach. 

"Yes, sir. You see, Pap could n't get any one 
to take my place in the store back home and so 
I could n't come no — any sooner." 

"Your father has a store? Where do you live, 
Benson?" 

"Huckinsburg, No'th Ca'lina. 'T ain't my 
father has the store, though. I ain't got nary 
father. Pap Huckins, he took me when I was 
a little feller and looked after me." 

"I see. Like it here at North Bank?" 

"Yes, sir, right well. There 's a nice lot of 
fellers here, sir." 

"Yes, that 's true. Where did you learn to 
play baseball, Benson?" 

"Right here, I reckon. I did n't know much 
about it before I come — came here. Course, 
I 'd play at it, like. We fellers at home had a 
nine, and we visited around and played other 
nines, but we did n'l go in much for fancy doings. 
Just hitting the ball and tearing around the bases 
was about all we did, and the fellers that pitched 
did n't know anything about curves and drops 
and so on. They were pretty easy, and I got 
so 's I could lambaste the ball pretty hard." 

"Well, it 's stood you in good stead, son. You 
certainly hit with a wallop now. I understand 
the fellows have dubbed you Three-Base Benson." 

Jerry grinned. "Yes, sir, I reckon so. Some 
of the fellers call me that. Seems like I can't hit 



THE PINCH-HITTER 



581 



noth— anything but three-baggers— when I do 
hit." 

"Which is pretty frequently," retorted^ the 
coach, dryly. "I wonder if you 've noticed, 
Benson, that I 've never insisted on you learning 
to bunt. And I 've let you keep your own style 
of batting. It is n't quite the style we aim at 
here, but I was afraid that if I tried to teach you 




""I UNDERSTAND THE FELLOWS HAVE DUBBED YOU THREE-BASE BENSON 



our way, you 'd make a mess of it. And I did n't 
want to ruin a good free-hitter by trying to teach 
him to cramp his bat. There are others who can 
lay down a bunt, or crack out a nice little base- 
hit, and so I 've let you alone and you 've devel- 
oped just the way I wanted you to. You 've 
got a fine eye for the ball and a mighty good wal- 
lop, and when you hit them, son, they travel! 
Don't you worry because they 're always three- 
baggers." 

"No, sir," agreed Jerry, gravely. "Reckon I 
might just as well keep on specializing, Mr. 
Keegan." 

"Right! You keep on specializing in three- 
base-hits, Benson, and you '11 fill the bill," laughed 
the coach. "I 'd like to have two or three more 
such specialists on the team! How do you like 
playing center-field?" 



"Fine, sir. Sometimes it gets sort of lonesome 
out there, just standing around and not doing 
much, but I reckon when we play Cumbridge 
there '11 be a heap more action. Course," added 
Jerry, hurriedly, "I ain't expecting to play in 
tncm — t hose games, but whoever does '11 be kept 

busy, likely." 

"Maybe. Still, if our pitchers work the way 
they should, there won't 
be much hitting on Cum- 
bridge' s part, I guess. 
And I think you may 
J count on playing center 
in one of the games, 
Benson; part of it, any- 
way. If you had the 
experience Beech has in 
that position, I 'd prom- 
ise it definitely. You 've 
tried hard and you 've 
learned a lot in a few 
weeks, and I appreciate 
it, son. And I '11 see that 
you get your chance. 
When you do get it, 
stand by me, Benson, and 
come through with the 
wallop!" 

"Yes, sir," replied the 
boy, gratefully and earn- 
estly, "I 'm aiming to do 
the best I can." 

"I 'm sure of it. You 
came mighty close to 
winning that St. John's 
game, and you may have 
another chance just like 
it before we 're through 
with Cumbridge. Here 
comes Train and a 
Now we '11 get to work. 
By the way, that Cumbridge pitcher, Tanner, has 
a slow ball that 's hard to get, and I 'm going to 
get Train to imitate it the best he can so you 
fellows will know it when you see it." 

Three days later, Coach Keegan's foresight 
counted heavily in the result of the first contest 
with the Dark Blue, at Holly, for Tanner, Cum- 
bridge Hall's first-choice twirler, pitched the game 
through, and that slow ball of his would have 
proved much more deadly had not the Light Blue 
batsmen learned something of it beforehand. All 
North Bank School went with the team and wit- 
nessed a remarkable game of ball that went to 
fourteen innings and resulted in a 3-3 tie! 

A pitchers' battle from start to finish, with 
Jack Grinnel opposing the red-haired Tanner, the 
contest had few stirring moments, perhaps, but 



couple of the fellows. 



582 



THE PINCH-HITTER 



IMay 



f 



was seldom lacking in the sort of suspense thai 
keeps the players keyed to the top-notch of 
efficiency and the spectators on the edges of their 
seats. All the scoring came in the first three 
innings; and after that, until it became necessary 
to call the game in order that North Bank might 
catch her train, it became a test of endurance, 
with defeat certain to fall to the lot of the team 
that "cracked" first. Perhaps, had the contest 
gone to another inning, the "crack" might have 
come; but as it was, although both Grinnel and 
Tanner had their weak moments when it seemed 
to their respective adherents that a deluge of hits 
was about to descend, both came through in 
triumph, Tanner with a record of nine strike-outs 
and Grinnel with seven. The Light Blue got 
eleven hits off Tanner, only one of which was 
good for an extra base, and the Dark Blue got 
eight from Grinnel, one good for three bags and 
one for two. Sharp fielding on both sides sec- 
onded the pitchers' work. 

In such disappointingly indecisive fashion, 
then, ended the first game of the series between 
the ancient rivals, and North Bank departed in a 
downcast mood. But before school was reached, 
some one sagely pointed out that if the Light 
Blue could win next Wednesday's game on her 
home field, she would have the series and the 
championship, since a third game was, by the 
agreement, called for only when the first two 
contests left the matter of supremacy undecided. 
And a tie game and a win would settle the ques- 
tion beyond doubt! Even Jerry Benson, who 
had adorned the substitute's bench all the after- 
noon, found his disappointment lightened by that 
cheering news. 

That night, in Number 7 Baldwin, Jerry lis- 
tened while his room-mate, Tom Hartley, who 
played third base, discussed the situation with 
Captain "Pop" Lord and "Tub" Keller. Pop 
played at first, and Tub caught. The captain 
of the nine was much more optimistic than any 
of the rest. "We ought to be mighty glad we 
managed to tie the game and did n't get licked," 
he said. "As it is, all we Ye got to do is win on 
Wednesday, for to-day's game is as good as a 
victory in that case." 

"Well, they won't start Tanner again," ob- 
served Tub, "and that other pitcher of theirs, 
Thorogood — " 

"What 's his name?" interrupted Tom Hartley, 
incredulously. 

"Thorogood. And he is good, but not so 
good as Tanner, and I 'II bet we can hit him." 

"Maybe," objected Tom. "but Keegan will 
pitch Thacher. Keep that in mind, old son." 

"What of it? Look at their records. Hal 
has won as many games as Jack, and — " 



"He has pitched more games, you chump!" 

"Never mind, he 's all right. I Ye caught them 
both, and I know. Besides, if Hal wobbles, Jack 
will be ready lo take his place. Take it from 
your Uncle Bud, fellows: if we can hit Thoro- 
good, we can cop the old ball-game!" 

'"If!" murmured Tom. "There 's a whole lot 
in an 'if I" 

But Pop Lord Laughed. "Keep your head up, 
Tom. Remember that we '11 be on our own 
grounds, with our own crowd behind us. We Ye 
got to do it, and we 're going to do it!" 

Later, when the two room-mates were ready 
for bed, Jem- said: "Tom, why you reckon Mr. 
Keegan did n't let me play none to-day?" 

Tom paused in the act of crawling between the 
sheets and hugged his knees a moment before 
replying. Then: "Why, I figure it out like this, 
Jerry," he said. "Keegan felt a lot like a fellow 
walking along the top of a fence. Just as long as 
he keeps going he 's all right, but if he stops to 
change his feet or take a breath or anything, why, 
over he goes! That game was mighty tiddley 
toward the end. Maybe, if Keegan had run in 
some new chaps to hit, we might have broken 
through and copped enough runs to win. And 
maybe we would n't have done anything of the 
sort. He 'd have had to take out fellows that 
were playing the game of their lives, and maybe 
the old game would have blown right up. Any- 
way, I guess that 's the way he figured it. Along 
toward the last of it, about the best he was hop- 
ing for was an even break, for Jack was getting 
mighty tuckered." 

Jerry nodded, relieved. "If that 's how it 
was," he said, "I don't mind. I thought maybe 
he reckoned I was n't good enough, Tom." 

"Well, that 's the way it was, old son," an- 
swered Tom, cheerfully. "When you get through 
admiring your feet you might just douse the glim." 

Monday was a day of hard practice, but on 
Tuesday, save for an hour of easy fielding and 
batting, the team had an afternoon of rest. That 
night there was an enthusiastic mass-meeting in 
Hall, and North Bank's hopes ran high as she 
cheered and sang and listened to speeches. Cum- 
hridge Hall descended on the school the next day, 
more than two hundred strong, and had a lot to 
say about what was to happen, and said it, more 
or less musically, as they paraded up from the 
station. 

Save that Thacher was on the mound instead 
of Grinnel and that Royce had replaced McGee 
at second, North Bank went into the game with 
the same line-up that had played in the first con- 
test. McGee had injured his leg in practice on 
Monday as a result of trying to block a runner at 
base. His injury, however, was not serious, 



and there was no question of his ability to take 
his position back should Royce not give a satis- 
factory account of himself. Jerry's secret hope 
of going in at center-field was blighted when 
Manager Birkenside read off the batting-list. 
Ted Beech was again slated for the position, and 
Jerry once more joined the bench-warmers, dis- 
appointed, but uncomplaining. 

On the third-base stand one whole section was 
vivid with dark-blue banners. Across the dia- 
mond, the North Bank color showed more pro- 
fusely, if less brilliantly, and North Bank cheers 
were incessant as the rival teams took their places, 
Cumbridge at bat and the Light Blue in the field. 
Hal Thacher threw a few wild ones to Tub Keller, 
the umpire called "Play!" and the head of the 
visitors' batting-list took his place and thumped 
the rubber determinedly with his bat. Then the 
cheering died away and the long-looked-for game 
was on. 

Hal Thacher caused his friends a lot of uneasi- 
ness that first inning, for he appeared to be suffer- 
ing from stage-fright and had much difficulty in 
finding the plate. He passed the first man up 
and put himself promptly in a hole with the 
second. Fortunately, the latter, when he did hit, 
knocked out a high fly to short left that Wayne 
Sortwell captured easily. Again Thacher pitched 
four balls and there were two on. Cumbridge 
cheered and shouted and stamped hopefully. In 
an effort to catch the runner on second napping, 
Thacher wheeled and pegged hurriedly to Jack- 
son, and the ball slammed into the dust and 
trickled into the field. Before it was retrieved, 
the runner had slid to third. A moment later, 
the man on first took second without challenge. 
With but one gone and men on third and second, 
the outlook seemed far from rosy for the home 
team, but Thacher settled down long enough to 
strike out the fourth batsman, and then, when 
the next man hit a weak one to the in-field, to get 
the ball ahead of Royce and slam it to Keller, at 
the plate, in time for a put-out. 

Thorogood, like Thacher, began with a bad 
inning, but, as in the other's case, escaped punish- 
ment. Jackson was hit in the ribs and took his 
base, Lord hit safely for one, and Conway flied 
out to short-stop. Royce was passed, advancing 
the runners and filling the sacks; but Tom Hartley 
fanned, and Sortwell was an easy third out, 
second to first. After that, the contest proceeded 
uneventfully to the fifth inning. Both Thacher 
and Thorogood had found their stride, hits were 
scarce and runs entirely missing. In the fourth, 
Conway reached third, with two out, and died 
there when Royce fouled out to catcher, and that 
was as near to a score as either team got in the 
first half of the game. 



H-HITTER - SM 

The fifth opened with Cambridge's hard-hitting 
left-fielder at bat; and that youth, a canny judge 
of balls, waited until Thacher had to offer him 
something reasonable. And when he did, he 
laced it into far center for three bases. That 
punishment seemed to grieve the Light Blue's 
pitcher so that he had no heart for his work in 
the succeeding five minutes, with the result that 
two more singles were added to Cumbridge's 
column and two runs came across. A fine double- 
play by Jackson and Lord stopped the visitors. 

North Bank went out in one-two-three order in 
her half of the inning, but in the sixth, after hold- 
ing the enemy, she brought delight and confidence 
to her adherents by scoring her first tally. This 
came as the result of a pass to Tub Keller, followed 
by a nice sacrifice fly by Thacher that placed Tub 
on second. Jackson fanned, then Pop Lord 
found something he liked and slammed it through 
the pitcher's box, and Tub scored. Lord went 
out a moment later in an ill-advised attempt to 
steal second. 

There was no scoring in the seventh inning by 
either side, although Cumbridge got men on 
second and first before a batting rally was nipped 
by some fine pitching. That inning witnessed 
the replacement of Beech in center-field by Jerry 
Benson, and the return to his position in the in- 
field of McGee as a result of loose playing on the 
part of the hard-working, but inexperienced, 
Royce. Of the Cumbridge nine, just four men 
faced the pitcher in the seventh. 

For North Bank, Conway began things with a 
bunt that placed him on first by a hair's-breadth. 
The umpire's decision brought loud criticism from 
the visitors, but, since he was ten feet from the 
base and they at the other side of the diamond, 
it is fair to assume that he was in a better position 
to judge the play. At all events, that decision 
brought North Bank her tying run. McGee's 
attempt to sacrifice resulted in his retirement, the 
ball dropping softly and safely into second base- 
man's hands. 

Then it was Jerry's turn; and as he took his 
place, a ripple of laughter arose in the Cumbridge 
stand. Jerry's "form" at bat was, to say the 
least, peculiar. He stood well back from the 
plate, his long legs wide apart and his bat held so 
far back that it lay almost across his shoulder- 
blades. He did n't swing his bat, nor, having 
once firmly established himself, did he move at all 
until he offered at a ball. He just watched the 
pitcher and then the ball, and waited. But al- 
though the Dark Blue rooters expressed amuse- 
ment, North Bank heralded Jerry's appearance 
with joyful acclaim, while the out-fielders, at the 
command of the short-stop, who was also Cum- 
bridge's captain, wandered farther backward. 



584 



THE PINCH-HITTER 



[May 



Thorogood had heard of Jerry, as had his catcher, 
and while the Light Blue's rooters expressed 
dissatisfaction in numerous ways, the catcher 
stepped to the right and Thorogood threw out to 
him. There was no question of reaching any of 
those balls, and Jerry had to stand there helpless 
until four of them had drifted past and the 
umpire motioned him to his base. For Jerry that 
was a heart-breaking and degrading experience, 
and he ambled to first with drooping head, quite 
as though he were personally responsible for what 
had occurred. 

It was left to Tom Hartley to deliver the hit 
that would bring Conway home and place Jerry 
on second, and Tom delivered it nicely, in the 
shape of a screaming single, just out of short- 
stop's reach. But that ended the scoring in the 
inning, for Sortwell struck out and Keller lifted 
a fly to right-field that retired the side. 

There was no scoring in the eighth. For that 
matter, no one reached first base for either team. 
The rival pitchers were going strong again, and 
two strike-outs fell to each. 

The ninth started with the head of Cumbridge's 
batting-list up. W ith one man out, a fly to short 
left eluded Sortwell, and the runner, taking a 
desperate chance, went on to second and slid 
under McGee's arm just as the latter swooped 
around the ball. That, too, was a questionable 
decision, perhaps, in which case it evened up for 
the former one. When the dust had settled, 
Thacher tried hard to strike out the Dark Blue's 
captain. But with two strikes on him and one 
ball, that youth caught a hook on the tip of his 
bat and arched it nicely out of the in-field just 
where no one, lacking wings, could possibly get 
under it. Captain Lord and McGee both tried 
for it, and Conway came in from right at top 
speed; but the ball fell safely to earth, and the 
runner on second took third and was only pre- 
vented from going home by quick action on Lord's 
part. As it was, he scuttled back to his base and 
was glad to reach it again. The Cumbridge cap- 
tain went to second on the first delivery. With 
men on third and second and but one out, North 
Bank's chance to pull out safely looked very dim. 
But when, a few minutes later, the next batsman 
had hit weakly to short-stop, and Jackson, after 
holding the runners, delivered the ball to Lord in 
the nick of time, the home team's stock advanced 
many points. And presently the suspense was 
over, for, after knocking two fouls into the right- 
field stand, the Cumbridge first baseman drove 
the ball straight at Lord's head, and Pop, more 
than half in self-defense, put up his hands and, 
fortunately for North Bank, it stuck there! 

'Another tie game!" was the prediction of 
many in the stands as the teams changed places 



for the last half of the ninth inning. But on the 
North Bank bench that belief did n't hold. "Go 
after them, fellows," said Captain Lord, earnestly. 
And, "Let 's take this game now," said the 
coach, quietly. "Don't let him fool you, boys. 
Make him pitch to you. You know what to do, 
Conway. Let 's have it!" 

"Conway up!" called Birkenside. "McGee on 
deck! Smash it, Dud!" 

Yet, although Conway twice tried his hardest 
to lay down a bunt that would allow his fast legs 
to take him to first ahead of the throw, he failed; 
and with two strikes and two balls against him, 
the best he could do was a weak grounder that 
was easily fielded by third baseman and pegged 
to first well ahead of the batsman. The North 
Bank cheers, which had dwindled away with the 
cheerers' trust in Dud, began again as McGee 
strode to the plate. But McGee repeated Con- 
way's fizzle with the first pitched ball ! Again 
third pegged unhurriedly to first for the out. 
Cumbridge yelled, wildly and triumphantly. 
Many less interested spectators were already 
dribbling toward the gate, sensing an extra-inn- 
ing contest that woidd drag along interminably 
without a decision. But North Bank was cheer- 
ing again now, undismayedly, even with a new 
note of fervor; not only cheering, but chanting! 
And the chant was this: 

"Benson! Benson! Three-Base Benson! Ben- 
son! Benson! Three-Base Benson!" 

"If he can deliver one of those wallops of his," 
muttered Lord, hopefully, to Coach Keegan, 'and 
get to third, I '11 bet Hartley can bring him the 
rest of the way!" 

"He will, I guess, if that pitcher will give him a 
chance," was the reply. "If he knows his busi- 
ness, though, he will pass him, as he did before." 

But with two out, the bases empty, and a tired 
arm at his side, Thorogood shook his head at the 
catcher's signal for a throw-out. He wanted to 
end the inning. He did n't believe altogether in 
Benson's ability as a hard hitter and felt fairly 
certain that, if he could n't dispose of him on 
strikes, he could make his hit a fly to the out-lield. 

Jerry, eying Thorogood anxiously, heaved a 
great sigh of relief as the first delivery, instead of 
passing wide of the plate, developed into a drop. 
In fact, he was so relieved that he did n't even 
offer at it, nor show surprise or resentment when 
the umpire called it a strike. Instead, he grinned 
slightly, with his eyes more than his mouth, took 
a firmer grip on his bat, spread his legs by another 
inch, and waited. The cheers from the right- 
field stand were continuous — designed, I fear, as 
much to discourage the pitcher as to encourage 
Jerry. 

Another delivery went past, this time a pal- 



THE PINCH-HITTER 



585 



pable ball, wide of the plate. Then Thorogood 
tried another drop. It had worked before, so 
why not again? Jerry watched the wind-up, 
watched the ball start from the pitcher's hand, 
watched it speed toward him like a gray-white 
streak, watched it — no, he did n't watch it after 
that, for he had dropped 
his bat and was racing 
to first ! 

About him arose a 
thunder of shrill paeans 
of joy that, as he swung 
around first, dwindled to 
something approaching 
silence. But in another 
instant the shouting grew 
again; for far out on the 
green expanse of sunlit 
turf, center-fielder and 
right-fielder had turned 
and were running back 
as fast as their legs 
would carry them ! And 
around the bases went 
Jerry, past second and on 
to third, and would have 
stopped there in com- 
formity to long custom 
had not Jackson waved 
and shouted him onward. 

"Go on, Jerry!" roared 
And}'. "Go on, yon idiot! 
It 's a home-run!" 

Some three and a half 
hours later, Pop Lord 
arose at his place beside 
the banquet board and 
held a glass aloft. They 
had eaten and sung and 
cheered and eaten more, 
those twenty happy ban- 
queters, and now, replete 
and comfortably weary, 
they had demanded a 
speech from the retiring 
captain. 

"Fellows," responded 
Pop,"and Coach Keegan, 

I 'm a heap too tired to make a speech. I would 
if I could, but you '11 just have to excuse me, I 
guess. All I Ve got to say is this: I 'm mighty 
happy. And I 'm mighty grateful to you fellows, 
each and every one of you, for the way you 've 
worked with me to make this evening one of the 



jolliest of my short life. And to our coach for the 
way he 's toiled with us and kept his temper many 
times when he might have let go with no blame 
to him! And — and to one other. So here 's to 
Three-Base Benson — " He stopped short in his 
burst of oratorv and shook his head. 




"AROUND THE BASES WENT JERRY, PAST SECOND AND ON TO THIRD" 

"Hold on! That won't do! To Home-Run 
Benson, the pinch-hitter with the punch! Let 's 
hear it!" 

And he did hear it. And so did Jerry, who, 
although shorn of his title, looked strangely con- 
tent and happy. 



MANUFACTURED MOTIVES 



By LOUISE WHITEF1ELD BRAY 



"Tell her not to come," said Barbara, in so 
decisive a tone that her mother looked up in 
surprise from the letter she had just read aloud. 

"Not come! Your cousin!" 

"Two or three times removed." 

"But her mother and I grew up next door to 
each other. I don't believe you half heard Cou- 
sin Mary's letter. Her husband must go to a 
sanitarium for a month. Naturally, she will go 
with him, and naturally she thought of sending 
Joan, or Jo-an — I never can remember how to 
pronounce the child's name — here." 

"I don't see why we have to have a distant 
relative — particularly one we don't know well 
enough to call by her right name — stay a whole 
month with us." 

"Barbara Bennett, whatan inhospitable speech ! 
You always love company. Why don't you want 
your cousin, child?" 

"She '11 be bored to death and hate it and us, 
and then I shall hate her. She 's lived in Europe 
most of her life, been everywhere and done every- 
thing there is to do, and still she 's only eighteen. 
What could I do with her?" 

"You need n't do anything. Her mother wants 
her to rest after a very gay winter in London, she 
says." 

"If she needs rest, she 'd better go to the sani- 
tarium too." 

"She is n't ill. She simply needs 
country life for a while." 

"She '11 get it in Bromfield. There can't be a 
quieter town in Massachusetts." 

"You had lots of good times here last summer." 

"I did, Mother, but she 's different. Imagine 
taking her to a dance at the inn when she 's used 
to balls, perhaps in castles. And can you see 
her dancing with boys of sixteen or seventeen, 
when she 's had princes for partners?" 

"You 're a horrid little snob, Barbara. I 
neither understand nor like your attitude. The 
only thing that matters is that an old friend has 
asked my help. I shall send a letter to Mary at 
once." 

Mrs. Bennett went to write, very much dis- 
turbed by what seemed to her a strange new 
"streak" in her sixteen-year-old daughter. She 
did not know that Barbara's irritation was due 
not so much to the proposed visit as to another 
cause. 

Barbara had just graduated from the town 
academy with first honors. She had been vice- 
president of her class, editor of the school paper, 



a quiet 



and tennis champion. She wanted to go to 
college — yearned to go as only a girl of sixteen 
can yearn, with room in her mind and heart for no 
other feeling. Yet she knew it was impossible. 
College required money, which Mrs. Bennett, a 
widow with a small property, could provide only 
by selling the house in which they lived' and 
which had been the home of Bennetts since the 
end of the seventeenth century. Therefore, Bar- 
bara never mentioned college to her mother, lest 
she propose to sacrifice the place which held all 
her dearest memories. Mrs. Bennett knew only 
that Barbara planned to teach, preparing at a 
normal school in a neighboring town. The long- 
ing to go to college, however, persisted like a dull 
ache in Barbara's heart. It was not surprising 
that she vented her feeling at the first excuse. 

When, a few weeks later, Joan arrived, Barbara 
met her at the little old vine-covered station. 

"She '11 wear French hats and French heels and 
talk with an accent," Barbara said to herself, as 
she stalked up and down the platform. "And 
every other sentence she '11 say, 'When my father 
was ambassador to Spain'; or, 'The last time I 
was in Constantinople.' She '11 have to be enter- 
tained every minute, though I have n't the ghost 
of an idea how I 'm going to do it." 

In spite of her doleful anticipations, Barbara 
felt a thrill of pride as she caught sight of the girl 
who, she knew, must be Joan. She had the 
delicate, fluctuating color that often accompanies 
auburn hair, and a smile that seemed to crinkle 
her whole face with pleasure. While Barbara 
saw only that Joan's suit and hat were simple and 
becoming, a more experienced observer would 
have perceived the perfection of material and 
cut. 

Joan ran straight to Barbara and threw her 
arms around her. 

"It 's wonderful to see 'home folks' after all 
these years!" she cried. 

When Barbara asked for baggage-checks, Joan 
gave her one, pointing out a small steamer-trunk 
in the truck-load left by the departing train. 

At Barbara's glance of surprise, Joan asked, 
"What 's the matter?" 

"I thought you 'd have several trunks," an- 
swered Barbara. 

"Oh, should I?" The older girl looked dis- 
turbed. "Mother counted on Bromfield being the 
quiet town she used to know. I '11 send for more 
things if you think I 'd better." 

"Bromfield has n't changed. Your mother was 



586 



.\ I AN UF ACT U R ED MOT I V ES 



587 



right ia thinking you would n't have much chance carved panel over the door of the parsonage, 

to wear good clothes here." "She 's putting that on," thought Barbara. 

Joan started to explain. "It 's not that; we "She can't make me believe she likes these corn- 
always travel as light as possible." Meanwhile, mon old houses when she 's seen every big city 
she was thinking, "What an ungracious person my in Europe." 

young cousin is!" . The expression on Joan's face, however, was 

Barbara was thinking, too. "It 's perfectly certainly not "put on," as she stood in front of 




" TO THINK OF LIVING IN SUCH A PLACE ALL ONE'S LIFE!' JOAN SAIL) SOFTLY" 



horrid of her to twit us the first thing with living 
in a little out-of-the-way town." Even as she 
thought this, she knew she was not being fair. 
She was doing that easiest thing in the world, 
manufacturing motives for other people's words. 

As they started down the main street of Brom- 
field, arched above with ancient elms, Joan 
stopped with an exclamation of delight. Through 
the trees she caught glimpses of well-built and 
well-placed houses, giving that atmosphere of 
comfort and quiet dignity characteristic of the 
earlier New England towns. She insisted on a 
criss-cross path up the street, in order that she 
might have a closer view of a colonial doorway 
or a brick-pathed garden. Joan seemed to Bar- 
bara ridiculously pleased to discover the hand- 



Barbara's own house, with its beautifully pro- 
portioned white pillars, wide porch, and green 
terrace. 

"To think of living in such a place all one's 
life!" she said softly. "The house itself would be 
a rebuke to anything not fine or kindly. Don't 
you love it, Barbara?" 

"Of course," answered Barbara, less fluent than 
Joan. She was thinking with relief that, by 
never mentioning college to her mother, she had 
never caused her to consider selling the old place. 

By supper-time, Joan and Barbara had chat- 
tered about a multiplicity of subjects, but Joan 
had not mentioned the last time she was in Con- 
stantinople nor her father's justly famous diplo- 
matic career. Instead, she had shown an eager 



588 



MANUFACTURED MOTIVES 



interest in the details of Barbara's own school-girl 
life and the boys and girls she was about to meet. 

Suddenly Barbara, condensing a coasting acci- 
dent into a single sentence, said abruptly, "You 
would n't be interested — you 've probably been 
coasting in Switzerland." 

"I have, but — " began Joan. 

Unfortunately, the tinkle of a silver bell an- 
nounced supper before she could express the 
bewilderment she felt at Barbara's tone. In her 
own room that night, she wrote: 

Mother dear, if it were n't for Cousin Ellen, who 
really seems glad to have your daughter here, I should 
be tempted to take the quickest train back to you. My 
cousin Barbara does not like me. She may remember 
that the last time we met, — she was five and I was 
seven, — I slapped her. Do you suppose she 'd feel more 
kindly toward me if I let her slap me now to even the 
score? She is perfectly polite and hospitably solicitous 
as to the number of towels on my rack, but the fact re- 
mains,— difficult as it will be for you to comprehend, — 
she does not like me. I 'd feel more disturbed if I could 
think of anything I 'd said or done in the half-day I 've 
been here, but so far I 've used my very best comp'ny 
manners. A thought! Did you, by any chance, with 
your maternal prejudice, make me out to Cousin Ellen 
such a paragon as any normal girl would inevitably des- 
pise in advance? Did you do that, Misguided Parent? 
Well, it won't take long to correct such an impression 
if you did ! 

Meanwhile, Barbara was talking with her 
mother about their guest. Mrs. Bennett de- 
clared herself delighted with the girl, her poise, 
adaptability, and sincerity. 

"Who would n't have poise," demanded Bar- 
bara, "with all her chances to get it? And I 
don't see why you say she 's sincere. She 's 
pretending all the time, just to be pleasant and 
make a good impression." 

"Do you think you are justified in making such 
a remark?" asked Mrs. Bennett, quietly. 

"Well, she kept me talking an hour this after- 
noon about school and the girls and what we do 
for amusement in the winter. She led me on 
with questions as if she were really interested." 
"Why should n't she be interested?" 
"Now, Mother, you know as well as I do. I 
did n't realize what a fool I was making of myself 
until the supper-bell rang." 

"Barbara, I thought you prided yourself on 
being fair. You 're not giving Joan even the 
benefit of the doubt. You have no right to sup- 
pose she means anything but what she says. I 
am tempted to follow your own example and read 
into your words motives I should be very sorry 
to find there — injustice and envy of other people's 
good fortune." 

Barbara flushed. "You '11 see I 'm right before 
she has been here very long." 

During the first week of Joan's visit, Barbara 
fought a battle between her stubborn determina- 



[May 

tion to stick to the point of view she had adopted 
before she saw Joan, and the sense of fairness 
which she ordinarily possessed. Joan soon won 
Barbara's respect, at least, by defeating her, the 
amateur champion of Bromfield, at tennis. 
• Barbara's friends, too, "fell for Joan strong," as 
Tom Elder put it. Still there remained a reser- 
vation in Barbara's mind. She could not quite 
believe that Joan was having as good a time as she 
said, that she was not constantly comparing the 
simple amusements of Bromfield with the gaiety 
of foreign cities, and the boys and girls, who were 
just ready for college, with the young diplomats 
and noted people she had known abroad. Joan 
never volunteered any information about these 
personages, though she was very willing to 
answer the questions of the eager young Brom- 
fieldians. 

It was Joan, indeed, who started an "Explorers' 
Club" in Bromfield, the purpose of which was 
"traveling at home." Joan, thanks to her father, 
a historian by avocation, knew more of the historic 
places of Boston and its vicinity than did these 
people who lived less than an hour away. She 
even insisted, in spite of the denial of the Brom- 
fieldians themselves, that their own town must 
be of historical interest. "The houses look so," 
she averred, not very logically. To prove her 
point, she made each member of a group of young 
people choose a house and report on its history. 
The results surprised every one but Joan. Parents 
and relatives drew from the farthest recesses of 
their memories tales of Revolutionary and Col- 
onial days. One house had been an important 
link in the "underground railway" for fugitive 
slaves before the Civil War. Another actually 
possessed a secret cupboard in which a Conti- 
nental ancestor had been hidden for five days 
during the British occupation of the town. Bar- 
bara would not believe in the existence of this 
cupboard until she was taken to it. Then, as a 
punishment for her disbelief, she was locked in. 

Meantime, the month of Joan's visit was speed- 
ing by. A few days before she was to leave, she 
received a letter from her mother telling her that 
the doctors advised her father to remain another 
month at the sanitorium and try a new treat- 
ment. The letter continued: 

I wish I know what was best for you, dear. The 
sanitorium would be very stupid for you after the young 
life at Bromfield. If I did not feel that a little friction 
still existed between you and Barbara, I should suggest, 
by all means, that you stay on with Cousin Ellen. I 
should insist on your boarding now, of course. Cousin 
Ellen would be glad to have you, I feel sure. Are n't 
you perhaps a little sensitive about Barbara's attitude 
toward you? At any rate, I leave the choice to you. 
Stay or come to us, as you like. You need not consider 
us. Your father is busy with one treatment or another 
all day and I am acting as his nurse. 



MANUFACTURED MOTIVES 



589 




"JOAN WON BARBARA'S RESPECT, AT LEAST, BY DEFEATING HER, THE AMATEUR CHAMPION OF 

BROMFIELD, AT TENNIS" 

pie ran in and out of the Bennett home that the 
two girls could easily avoid any quiet, intimate 
talks with each other. Joan, conscience-smitten, 
knew that by using the tact or frankness her 
mother had suggested she could long ago have 
forced the issue instead of avoiding it. She 
determined, now, before she made her decision 
concerning the remainder of the summer, to have 
a frank talk w ith Barbara at the first opportunity. 
That opportunity came immediately. 
When Joan asked Mrs. Bennett whether she 
remembered any early records of the town or 
family, the older woman hesitated. "Why — ■ 
yes, — that is, I think there must be. Td tell the 
truth, every spring and autumn I clean two old 
hair trunks full of papers in the attic, but I 
never have time to read them." 

"I know there are some old letters there," de- 
clared Barbara, "because the stamps I cut off 
years ago were the gems of my collection. Let 's 
look, anyway." 



By the way, if you stay, your father would like you 
to do some "researching" for him. He is much inter- 
ested in what you have written to us about the old houses 
in Bromfield and thinks there may be some entirely 
fresh material in the town for his colonial history. He 
wishes you to ask Cousin Ellen whether she either 
possesses, or remembers hearing of, old letters, records, 
or papers. If any are available, he would like copies 
made. 

One thing more, Joan dear. The more I think of 
your feeling about Barbara, or hers toward you, the 
more I think you are partly to blame for letting it go on. 
When I ask you to be explicit, you say it is something 'in 
the air,' or 'in her manner.' If it is nothing more 
definite than that, you ought to be able to overcome it 
by tact or frankness. Is Barbara perhaps a wee bit 
jealous by temperament? Remember, you have the 
advantage of being two years older and of having had a 
much wider experience. 

Ellen and I had such a joyous girlhood in the very 
house in which you are staying, I want you to be equally 
happy there. 

Joan, thinking a long time over the letter, 
realized that she had made no great effort to 
overcome Barbara's antagonism. So many peo- 



S90 



MANUFACTURED MOTIVES 



Under the eaves in the attic the two girls found 
two brass-bound trunks full of papers. Many 
were yellow with age, the ink faintly legible. 
Since there seemed to be no order nor arrange- 
ment, the girls plunged in. Barbara's first paper 
proved to be an uncle's commission as captain in 
the Civil War. 

"He was to marry Miss Letitia Todd, the little 
old lady who lives alone in the big white house on 
Elm Street. She never married. Once a year, 
on his birthday, she comes here to dinner." 

Joan's paper was a puzzle. The ink had faded 
in many places, so that a magnifying glass would 
be necessary to decipher the whole document. 

"It seems to be a will," she told Barbara. 
"Some one seems to have been disinherited for 
loyalty — how queer !" 

"Let me see the names," said Barbara, bending 
eagerly over the paper. "I can almost make out 
one. Oh, I know! That was Preserved Taber. 
The Tabers were Mother's line. One of them 
remained loyal to the king at the time of the 
Revolution and no one in the family ever spoke 
to him again." 

Joan's eyes by this time were shining. She- 
had inherited her father's historical imagination. 
She was not at all daunted by the fact that the 
next half-dozen papers the trunk yielded proved 
to be nothing more interesting than bills and 
deeds of a much later date. 

"Let 's not take them as they come," she sug- 
gested sensibly, "but pick what looks interesting. 
Here is a bunch of letters tied with something 
that looks like ribbon and rattles like paper." 

"That is old-fashioned 'cap ribbon,' " explained 
Barbara, "for the bows on the ladies' caps. 
Mother has a roll that came from England and 
belonged to her great-grandmother. This may 
be part of the same piece, faded with age." 

Joan puzzled so long over the bunch of letters 
that Barbara grew impatient. 

"What is it?" she asked. "You must have 
found something interesting." 

Joan looked up, her eyes bright with excitement. 
"Father won't need any more sanitorium when 
he hears about this. These letters were written 
from England by a Massachusetts Bennett who 
went over on business and apparently was n't 
allowed to come back. Just think, Barbara! 
He actually heard Edmund Burke make his 
speech 'On Conciliation with America.' Oh, how 
I wish I could take these letters to Father this very 
minute!" 

Joan laid the bundle down at her side where 
she could pat it frequently for pure joy. As the 
girls went on through the box, they found a 
strange mixture of legal documents, grants, bills, 
diaries, diplomas, school reports, and letters such 



[May 

as could never have collected had the Bennett 
family not lived in this same house for generations 
Barbara, with a literary rather than an histori- 
cal imagination, loved the names they found in 
the older papers, Patty Pomeroy, Hepzibah Taber, 
Delight Homer, and several times in different 
generations her own name, Barbara Bennett. 

Joan laid down the last paper with a sigh, after 
their hasty survey. "Father must see these 
things," she said, "but how is he going to do it? 
I could n't copy them in a month of Sundays." 

As she spoke, she was reminded of her mother's 
letter and her own determination to have a .talk 
with Barbara. 

"Barbara," she said, "are you comfortable, 
doubled up in that trunk? If you are, I want to 
talk to you." 

Barbara looked surprised. She was aware, and 
of course hurt, that Joan had avoided any such 
talks with her. 

"I '11 be all right when I get both feet either in 
or out," she answered. "Now go ahead." 

Joan tried to choose the right words. "Well- 
it 's like this. Mother writes that Father must 
stay another month in the sanitorium. She 'd 
like to have me stay here and board with you if 
your Mother is willing, and I 'd like to stay if— 
you— are willing. I— I Ve seen— well, I know 
that you don't— that there 's something about 
me you don't quite approve of." At Barbara's 
flush, Joan explained hastily: "I don't mean you 
have n't been perfectly polite or that you have n't 
given me a perfectly wonderful time, but I have 
felt, somehow, that you were doing it out of a 
sense of duty and that you did n't really like me. 
Won't you tell me what the trouble is?" 

Barbara was thoroughly ashamed that she had 
allowed a guest to feel as Joan had obviously felt. 
Yet to Joan's frankness, she must answer frankly, 
and she replied: 

"To tell the exact truth, I don't think it was 
quite nice of you to pretend the way you 've done 
here this summer." 

"Pretend?" Joan looked as bewildered as she 
felt. 

"Well, have n't you pretended to like Bromfield 
and the silly, simple things we do here, when all 
the time you must have been laughing to yourself 
because we had n't done anything nor been any- 
where the way you have?" 

For a moment Joan was very angry. 

"What right had you to suppose I meant any- 
thing but what I said?" 

Barbara was honest. "Of course I had n't any; 
but — well, it was just plain common sense to 
think our dances and parties and us boys and 
girls were stupid compared to the sort of thine 
you were used to and the people you had known.' 



MAM' FACTU RED M OTIVES 



591 



Into Joan's mind flashed what her mother had 
said about the "advantage of her wider experi- 
ence." She realized that there was not a little 
envy in Barbara's hostility, which had not been 
hostile to any unpleasant degree, after all, unfair 
as it had been. Joan remembered, too, that her 
mother had said that she herself was to blame for 
not overcoming that hostility. 

"Barbara," said Joan, "the real truth is that 
I envy you, instead of feeling superior." 
"What!" gasped Barbara. 



'I do,' 



"I envy vou your life 



went on Joan, 
here in Bromfield, the 
quiet, serene, orderly 
happiness of it, the — the 
American-ness of it all. 
I Ye gone from one part 
of Europe to another all 
my life. I Ye seen inter- 
esting people, to be sure, 
and done all kinds of ex- 
citing things, but almost 
always with foreigners. 
I have n't grown up with 
American boys and girls. 
Whenever I learned to 
care for an American 
girl, she was always 
plucked away from me, 
in a month or two, to 
go home or to school. 
I Ye never been to school 
where the lessons were 
taught in English. I Ye 
never had a chance to 
do the pleasant, normal 

things you take as a matter of course. That 's 
w hy I was so anxious to come here, where Mother 
was a girl and where I could be with you and other 
girls. I Ye truly and honestly had the best time 
in Bromfield I ever had in all my life. Do you 
see what I mean, Barbara dear?" 

Barbara unfolded herself from the trunk and 
ran over to Joan. 

"I 'm so ashamed, Joan. I have n't been tail- 
or decent, and the worst of it is, I knew it all the 
time. I Ye been doing that dreadful thing Mother 
calls 'manufacturing motives.' Vou will stay, 
won't you, Joan, and let me start all over?" 

Joan smiled in the way that had made her 
friends in all parts of Europe. 

"Of course I '11 stay. I guess the trouble is 
that your imagination is too active. I '11 prob- 
ably wish I had some of it when I get to college." 

Barbara dropped, Turk fashion, at Joan's 
side. 

"Are you going to college?" 

"I am if I can get in. I Ye had the most 



reckless, ridiculous preparation, with a little of 
one school, less of another, mostly in Switzerland, 
and with what Mother and Father had time to 
teach me on the side. I Ye got to spend I his 
year catching up on things they don't teach 
abroad." 

"I supposed you 'd 'come out' and never think 
of college." 

"I had a taste of that last year in London. It 
w as lots of fun, but I 'm like John Quincy Adams. 
Don't you remember, when he was a boy, he went 
with his father on diplomatic missions to several 




'BARBARA,' JOAN SAID, ARE YOU COMFORTABLE DOUBLED Ul> IN THAT 



TRUNK?' 



countries in Europe, but when he was oi college 
age, he refused to stay any longer and came home 
to get an American education. That 's what 
I 'm going to do, but I feel certain that entrance 
requirements are more difficult than they ever 
were in John Quincy's day." 

"Are n't you lucky!" breathed Barbara. 

"I had n't noticed it," replied Joan. "Why, 
look here, you 're going to college, arc n't 
you?" 

"Can't. I have n't the money." 

"But you must go. The girls say you gradu- 
ated with one of the best records any one ever 
made at Bromfield Academy." 

"Oh, well, it is n't a very large academy, even if 
it is old." 

"It 's one of the best preparatory schools in the 
State, Judge Henderson told me." 

As Joan said this, a thought flashed into her 
mind. 

"Barbara, how much could your mother actu- 
ally spare a year to send you to college?" 



592 



MANUFACTURED MOTIVES 



"Not over a couple of hundred dollars, includ- 
ing clothes and everything. It can't be done. 
1 can manage to go to normal school, and that 's 
all." 

"Would you mind putting off college for an- 
other year?" asked Joan. 

"Would you mind listening while I talk?" 
replied Barbara. "I have told you in words of 
one syllable that I can't go to college." 

"Oh, yes, you can." Joan's eyes shone with 
excitement at the plan developing in her brain. 
"Father is going to travel a year for his health. 
I was going to enter a preparatory school. Why 
should n't I go, instead, to Bromfield Academy 
and board with your mother?" 

Joan could see how much the deprivation of 
college had meant to Barbara by the joy in her 
face as she listened to the other girl's plan. 

"Oh, it would be too wonderful!" Barbara 
exclaimed. Her mind leaped ahead to still an- 
other plan. "I 'm all ready for college now, so I 
could spend the year working. If I could get 



together enough for two years of college, I could 
manage the others somehow." 

Joan's eyes rested on the heaps of papers cover- 
ing the floor beside them. 

"Here 's your work!" she cried. 

"Where?" asked the bewildered Barbara. 

"Right here before you. I have helped Father 
enough in his historical work to know that he will 
be perfectly mad about this material. He can't 
carry- valuable papers with him when he travels. 
These will all have to be sorted and copied — work 
enough to keep you busy for months. Oh, Bar- 
bara, won't it be fun? Why, what 's the matter?" 

Barbara's face had lost the radiance of her first 
joy. 

"I was thinking how silly and stupid and unfair 
I was to you, and how splendid you are to me!" 

Joan reached over and shook Barbara gently by 
the shoulders. 

"Oh, pshaw! that 's all over. I tell you what 
I '11 do — if I find you manufacturing any more 
motives, I '11 strangle your imagination." 



DEMOCRACY 

%y ISABEL L.WHITNEY 




They made me into a May- queen 
And put a crown on my Lead. 

But Jack said he'd much rather 
Play "President ''instead. 

And the other childrea went away 
To cfather some more flowers j 

So I nad no one to reign over 
In this free land of ours . 





MADAM CATBIRD HAD RETURNED 



DADDY CATBIRD 



WHAT THE FLASH-LIGHT SHOWED 



A CAMERA ADVENTURE WITH CATBIRDS 

By HOWARD TAYLOR MIDDLETON 



Theodore, aged six, was standing beneath a 
cherry-tree from which he had just descended. 
He brought with him a cluster of luscious fruit 
and a bit of interesting information. The former 
he kept strictly to himself, the latter he gener- 
ously bestowed on us. "I saw a nest in the bushes 
while I was up 'at ole tree!" he volunteered, be- 
tween bites. 

"W hat kind of a nest was it, dear?" asked Pal, 
much impressed. 

"Don't call me, 'dear'; I ain't no g-u-r-r-u-1 !" 
Then realizing, perhaps, that he had been a bit 
abrupt in his conversation with a lady, he grinned 
sheepishly and explained: "I think it are a cat- 
bird. It 's got three blue eggs in it." 

Thanking Theodore for his store of good news, 
and extracting from him a solemn promise that 
he would molest neither the eggs nor the nest, we 
left him to his feast of cherries. Then, cameras in 
hand, we approached with due caution the hair- 
lined, grassy cup In the blackberry tangle that was 
the home of the catbirds. 

Pal and I always carry tw r o cameras with us 
when bird-hunting; one, a long-focus machine for 
nesting scenes, or any picture which does not 
require a greater shutter-speed than i/ioo of a 
second; the other, with a maximum shutter-speed 
of 1/ iooo of a second, for action photographs. 

Setting up the long-focus camera, on its tripod 
at the front door of Catbird Villa, we attached 
a slender thread to the shutter-trip, and, carrying 
it with us to a distance of several yards, went into 
hiding, there to await the arrival of the feathered 
mistress of the nest. A few moments only of 



watchful waiting had elapsed when we discerned 
a slate-gray streak flash through the foliage above 
the nest and come to rest upon the rim for an 
instant — Madame Catbird had returned! That 
instant was ours; the thread was pulled, gently 
but firmly, and we had our first picture. 

Fearing that the presence of the big camera so 
near her might frighten the brooding bird from 
her eggs if we at- 
tempted any more 
portraits at that 
time, we decided 
to defer further 
work until the 
hatching of the 
nestlings. So, after 
procuring a strik- 
ing record of 
Daddy Catbird on 
his way home with 
a fat worm for his 
busy spouse, we 
retired, well con- 
tent. 

A week slipped 
by, and again we 
visited the grassy 
cup in the black- 
berry tangle. This time, instead of three frag- 
ile blue eggs, a trio of hungry infants con- 
fronted us as we prepared for another picture. 
Just as we had set our impromptu studio in 
order, the late afternoon sun went to bed behind 
a cloak of inky clouds; the light failed utterly, 




" T SAW A NEST IN THE 
BUSHES,' HE VOLUNTEERED" 



593 



594 

while a rumble of distant thunder heralded an 
approaching shower. Nothing short of a flash- 
light would suffice under these conditions, we 
knew full well. Fortunately, we had our flash 
apparatus along, and il was soon established be- 
side the camera (with which it works synchro- 
nously) and the thread attached. As before, we 




POSING ON THE BRANCH OF ELDER 



lay hidden until the mother catbird returned to 
the nest. As she deposited a succulent grub in 
the gaping mouth of her hungriest offspring, again 
the thread was pulled. A flare of blinding white 
radiance shot out from the flash-gun. a dull boom 
mimicked the voice of the coming storm, and we 
had still another addition to our series! 

Thirteen more days came and went, and the 
little catbirds had undergone a wonderful trans- 
formation. From naked baby birds they had 
changed to fully feathered youngsters, with the 
ability- to fly a little and to eat a great deal. In 
another day, or two at the most, home ties would 




"THE MOTHER-BIRD CAME TO SUPERINTEND THE JOB 



be severed— the family scattered for all time. 
If we were to complete the series we coveted, we 
must make the most of the present opportunity, 
trusting to catbird mother-love to aid us. 



[May 




THE CAMERA GROUP 



Our first step was to take the young birds from 
the nest and place them carefully upon a branch 
of elder. While arranging the little subjects upon 
the overhanging limb, the mother-bird came to 
superintend the job, perching contentedly within 
an inch of Pal's small hand. This was a new 
experience in our dealings w ith w ild birds, and we 
were naturally much elated. 

"Let 's put the kiddies on the camera and sec 
what happens!" cried Pal, enthusiastically. A 




AN ATTEMPT TO DELIVER PROVISIONS 



moment later we had a picture of the mother- 
bird perched upon the handle of the camera, while 
her children called to her from the bellows. 

"How about holding those lively juveniles in 
the palm of your hand, Pal 5 The mother will 
come to them there, I am sure!" was my inspira- 
tion as I increased the shutter-speed of the camera 
to 1/ iooo of a second — we were expecting swift 
action now! 

"If we can only include the fond parent in this 
picture, I fancy it will be the 'best thing we have 



A CAMERA ADVENTURE WITH CATBIRDS 



I92I ] A CAMERA ADVENT 

ever done!" enthused my companion, and then 
called, "Get ready; she 's coming!" 

With my eyes in the mirror, I turned the focus- 
ing-screw in mad haste, and as the image of the 
flying bird appeared for the small fraction of a 
second, hovering over Pal's hand, I pressed the 
release, — "Thud!" — and away she went without 
delivering the juicy cherry she carried in her 
beak. Settling on the ground near by, she im- 
mediately prepared to try again. I changed 
plate-holders at my best speed, and soon had 
another thrilling chance, which resulted also in 
a unique picture. 

Upon her third trip, the mother alighted in such 
a curious manner that while one baby got the 




ANOTHER THRILLING CHANCE 



cherry in his mouth, as per request, another 
received his mother's claw, which was n't nearly 
so palatable, of course. However, accidents will 
happen in the best regulated families. 

"It would be great fun to have a picture show- 
ing mother catbird leaving the studio. W ill you 
try for that pose next time?" 

"Anything to oblige," I answered confidently, 
changing plate-holders once again. 

The feat accomplished, a soap box was found 
as a seat for Pal and the subjects again transferred 
— this time to the instep of her out-thrust shoe. 




A DIFFICULT LANDING ON A CROWDED FIELD 



J RE WITH CATBIRDS 595 

Having only two plates left, we meant to show 
"something on foot" at the end. 

There is no doubt about Mother Catbird being 
a skilled bird-woman, but there is just one little 
stunt she cannot perform — namely, make a per- 
fect landing on a crowded field. She deposited 




ACCIDENTS WILL HAPPEN" 



her cargo correctly, it is true, but behold how 
badly she bumped the spectators! 

"One more plate — what shall the picture be?" 
I asked. 

"I have it!" — this from Pal, after a moment's 
thought, and with great joyousness. "As a per- 
fectly fitting finale to this memorable series of 
wild-life portraits, we will have a picture ot 
Mother Catbird perched on the very peak of my 
shoe, from which point of vantage she shall lecture 
her little ones upon the dangers of over-eating. 
The way those kids have been consuming cherries, 
stones and all, this morning, calls for just such a 
proceeding if indigestion is to be prevented." 
And so the camera made its last exposure. 

Not being familiar with the catbird language, 
we cannot vouch for the fact that the matter 
in question was brought before the meeting at 
this final conference. Whatever subject was 
acted upon, however, it received the approval 
of a majority, despite one violently dissenting 
vote — the picture shows it all very clearly. 




A LECTURE TO THE YOUNG 



JACK THE KILL-O-WATTER 



By CHARLES A. HOYT 



Fred Bovvers stood in the open door of the 
power-house, gazing anxiously down the road. 
I he lights were just coming on in the six villages 
served by the plant and the water-wheel gover- 
nor was gradually opening the gates of the turbine 
a little wider to take care of the increased load. 

"It takes him a long time," he said to Jed 
Walker, an apprentice he was breaking in. "I 
wish I were home." 

"What *s the matter with your father?" asked 
Jed, sympathetically. "I mean, what does the 
doctor think ails him?" 

"He won't say," said Fred, gloomily; "just 
looks at him and goes home. I » m going to hold 
him up and make him tell to-night." 
(( "I wish I felt a little surer of myself," said Jed. 
"You could go home, but I 'm a little scary about 
the place when the load is coming on." 

Fred reassured him. "Never mind, I 'II catch 
the doctor as he goes by and make him tell me." 

Accordingly, he ran out bareheaded, a moment 
later, and talked earnestly with the doctor. Jed 
watched him as he came slowly back down the 
steep path to the plant. 

"What did he say?" he asked, before Fred 
reached the door. 

_ "Nervous prostration," said Fred, briefly, 
sitting disconsolately down at the desk and drum- 
ming with his fingers. "No excitement, no talk 
about business or the plant, just quiet and com- 
plete rest is what he needs." 
"How long?" asked Jed. 

Fred sagged his chin down on his hands. "Don't 
know. Two months anyway, maybe more." 

Jed tried to be comforting. "We can take care 
of it all right. We '11 just keep the place up fine 
and dandy— not let him hear a thing about it, and 
he 'II be all right." 

() "We can try." Fred drew a long breath. 
"The only trouble is that you 've been here only 
two months." 

"I started and stopped the place for two 
weeks," announced Jed, proudly. "Your father 
never found a word of fault, and that 's saying a 
good deal, for you know how he 's been lately." 

"That 's good," said Fred, absently. 

"I lined up the inside of the water-wheel last 
Saturday," continued Jed, importantly. "It was 
out of line to beat all." 

"Fine!" said Fred; "that 's good. But I '11 
tell you, Jed, this being able to start and stop the 
plant and do all these odd chores is a long way 
from being able to run the whole thing," 

S96 



;'What else do you do? Your father said I was 
doing fine and went away lots of times and left 
me alone." 

(( "You are doing fine," said Fred, approvingly 
you learn quickly and get along splendidly; but 
there re so many things besides that. You have to 




" WHEN YOU 'VE GOT INTO TROUBLE AND THEN OUT 
AGAIN, YOU CAN CALL YOURSELF A 
POWER-HOUSE MAN' " 

learn to keep your head in an emergency— you 
have to learn how to think and act quickly." 

"What do you mean?" asked Jed, wondcringly. 
"All you do is to start up and run and keep 
running." 

Fred made a gesture of impatience. "Every 
soldier has to have a baptism of fire— every 
power-house man has to have things happen to 
him before he 's safe and sure. 1 've been through 
it and I know." 

"How are you going to arrange the shifts?" 
"I '11 put the night-man on daytimes, and I '11 
sleep here, so as to be handy if you get into 
trouble at night." 

Jed swelled out his chest perceptibly. "I 'H 
have the night run, will I?" 

Fred nodded, and smiled inwardly. He could 
remember how important he had felt over being 
in full charge. 

"I wonder—" Jed flushed a little and hesitated, 



JACK THE KILL-O-WATTER 



597 



" — I wonder if we could have a flash-light picture 
of the place?" 

"Don't need to; we 've already got pictures of 
the plant." 

"I mean with me running it," stammered Jed. 
"I 'd like to send Mother one." 

"Fred slapped him on the back and laughed. 
"When you 've won your spurs, — when you 've 
got into trouble and then out again, — you can 
call yourself a power-house man and have your 
picture taken with your hand on the bare copper 
wires — Jove defying the lightning." 

The evening dragged slowly by. The two 
loafed around the place, read some old magazines 
by snatches, and walked restlessly up and down 
the floor. 

"I don't mind night runs after ten or half past," 
said Jed, "but before that I keep thinking of 
what the boys are doing. It's awful when there 's 
a basket-ball game on." 

"People never think of the power-house man," 
replied Fred. "Whenever they get up in the 
night they switch on the light just as if it were 
water, always on tap. They don't think of the 
long hours we put in, walking up and down in 
front of the switchboard, seven nights every 
week." 

"How is the pulp-mill running?" inquired Jed. 

"Dandy, when we are hitched up with the 
Morris plant; but when we have them alone, they 
just about stall us when they start their big 
motor, the one they grind pulp with." 

"How do you get along with the Morris plant 
— how do you tell how much load they have?" 

"You see, it is this way." Fred had explained 
it a dozen times, but patiently went over the 
arrangement again. "They are ten miles away, 
down the river at the big falls, but it 's just the 
same as if they were right here in the room. 
Whichever one of us wants to, can 'phase in' on 
the other. That is, we can start our machines 
and when they are running at exactly the same 
speed and about the same voltage, we can throw 
in our circuit-breakers and they stay in. If we 
are running slower or faster, it 's just the same as 
a short circuit, and our switch flies out." 

"It 's mighty funny the way that synchronizing 
instrument works," said Jed, gazing at it. "Which 
way did you say the hands revoke when this 
machine is too fast?" 

"Toward the side marked fast. See there, 
clock-wise." 

"Oh, yes, I see," said Jed, confidently. "You 
put in this plug and that connects up each ma- 
chine you are trying to put together ; one each side 
of the instrument — it 's easy as falling off a log." 

"After you get the two machines together," 
Fred went on, "they are locked electrically. Then 



you can shtit off the water, if you want to, and 
run this generator as a motor." 

Jed groaned. "Oh, gee! Just as soon as you 
get one lot of things learned, there 's a lot more. 
Who would want to run it as a motor, anyway? 
Let 's have a game of dominoes!" 

"You 'd better get out your text-books and 
study up on synchronizing and a lot of other 
things. I 'm going to bed." And Fred started 
for the loft. 

He lay down with a sigh of relief. He dared 
not leave the place an instant at night; he must 
stay on the job from six in the evening till six the 
next morning. Jed was all right when there was 
no trouble; but let anything happen, and a more 
experienced hand was necessary. 

The regular night-man must take the day run, 
as they had lately connected up with a plant ten 
miles away to help carry the tremendous load 
thrown on them by the new pulp-mill — over fifteen 
hundred horse-power. It took eternal vigilance 
to keep the two plants adjusted properly, each 
with it's proper share— a task utterly beyond 
Jed's modest store of knowledge. 

The rumble of the plant in the room below 
gradually faded away and Fred slept. Suddenly 
he was dragged half out on the floor! 

"Come quick! The Morris plant is in trouble! 
The night-man clown there is half crazy, calling 
me up every minute!" 

Fred struggled into his clothes and ran down 
stairs. 

"What 's the rip?" 

"His water-wheel is running away," shouted 
Jed. "He called up and said he could n't shut 
the water-wheel off — something in the gates!" 

"What have you done?" Fred flashed a light- 
ning glance over the switchboard. 

"Nothing! Not a thing! What can I do?" 

"Keep your head, for one thing," snapped Fred. 
"We '11 give him our load to help hold him." 

"I tried to, but look there!" Jed pointed to 
the synchronizing instrument. "I put in the 
plug to hitch up with him, and look at that !" 

The single hand, which ought to stand upright 
on the figure zero when each machine was exactly 
the same speed, was a dim blur as it sped to the 
left, or counter clock-wise. 

Fred gasped. "Holy smoke ! He 's running at 
double his regular speed." 

He speeded up his own water-wheel from nine 
hundred revolutions a minute to twelve hundred. 
The lights flamed up intensely bright. 

"Not fast enough!" he shouted to Jed. "Call 
up the pulp-mill !" 

"Nobody there but the night-watchman!" 
yelled Jed. 

"Call him quick and tell him to start every 



598 



JACK THE KILL-O- WAITER 



It '11 help, even if they do 



motor on the place, 
run idle." 

Jed did so, and a few moments later the load 
commenced to increase. "Now tell the Morris 
man to screw up his circuit-breakers so they can't 




NOW!' YELLED FRED. YOUR WHOLE WEIGHT — DOWN WITH II 



fly out, and shut his head-gates as fast as he can. 
We 've got to do the rest." 

Then he glanced at his instruments, and, noting 
that he had on over three hundred more horse- 
power of load, sped up the great turbine. 

The usual high-pitched note of the generators 
increased to a roar. Dust flew from them and the 
floor shook. The speed-indicator showed twelve 
hundred, then fourteen, and finally sixteen hun- 
dred revolutions a minute before there was any 
chance to get in on the other circuit. Fred's face 
turned an ashy gray. The runaway speed— that 
is, the extreme safe speed-limit for the genera- 



|May 

tors— was fifteen hundred revolutions a minute 
They were running a hundred oxer and were 
liable to explode any moment in their wild race 
Suddenly he threw in the connecting switch with 
- I he hand had stood on the zero mark 
for the fraction of a sec- 
ond. The switch held, 
and he leaped to the 
water-wheel governor 
and commenced to give 
the load over to the Mor- 
ris plant. If he threw it 
on suddenly, some of the ■ 
switches might fly out. 
It he was not quick 
enough, the tremendous 
speed or the high voltage 
might wreck one plant 
or the other. Little by 
little he gingerly shut 
his water-wheel gates. 
Little by little the speed 
slackened. In a few sec- 
onds he had the water 
all shut off and had the 
entire load, with the gen- 
erator added, running as 
a motor on the runaway 
plant. Still the speed 
was terrific — over three 
hundred revolutions a 
minute above normal. 

Jed rushed from the 
telephone; "The night- 
watch at the pulp-mill 
says he 's going to pull 
his switches — his motors 
are tearing themselves to 
pieces!" 

Fred turned, aghast. 
"Tell him if he does, he 
won't have any more 
power— we '11 all blow up 
here. Tell him io give 
us all the load he can! 



He leaped to the water-wheel with an oil-can. 
A thin thread of smoke was curling up from the 
bearings at each end. He poured a quart of oil 
into each one, but it only seemed to add fuel to 
the flame. "Hey!" he veiled to Jed, who ran out 
of the telephone booth and stared at the smok- 
ing bearings. "We 've got to do something, 
quick! Help me get in one of those eight by 
eights!" 

"What on earth — " began Jed. 

"No talk!" shouted Fred, running outside. 
Jed found him tugging on a square timber sixteen 
feet long that lay beside the building. "Take it 



«„] JACK THE K 

inside!" he gasped. "We '11 take a pry on one of 
the couplings — put a brake on it!" 

They carried it as easily as if it were a match, 
although ordinarily they could hardly lift it. 

"Now get that big block over here to pry on!" 
shouted Fred, running as he spoke. Together 
they placed the heavy block alongside the whirl- 
ing shaft and gingerly adjusted their huge lever 
on one of the flange couplings that bolted the 
generator to the water-wheel. It was indeed time 
they were doing something ! The whole building 
shook violently. The lights flamed dazzling white, 
the voltage a third higher than usual. Every 
bearing was smoking hot and one was blazing. 

"Easy now!" warned Fred. They pressed the 
end of the stick gently up under the spinning 
coupling, which was some sixteen inches in diam- 
eter and about five inches thick, and consisted of 
two polished steel disks bolted together, with a 
smooth outer rim. 

For a moment it had no effect whatever. They 
bore down a little harder, and the smoke curled up 
as the steel disk started to bury itself in the wood. 

"Now!" yelled Fred. "Your whole weight — 
down with it! Break it down!" Instantly a flame 
sprung from the wood as the spinning-disk 
buried itself, but the friction on nearly a half 
of the coupling told. The water-wheel slowed 
down to normal speed. 

"Now back out to the end of the stick and sit 
on it!" shouted Fred. "I '11 cool those bearings." 

Running from one to another, he poured in oil, 
a pailful at a time. The smoke spouted from the 
improvised brake, filling the room so full that 
the lights hardly showed through it. 

"1 can't stand this much longer!" exclaimed Jed. 

"You 've got to," Fred retorted. Even as he 
spoke the lights dimmed and the speed slackened. 

"Take it off!" shouted Fred, pushing Jed away 
and throwing the timber to the floor. He turned 
the water into the wheel-case and the lights 
brightened. 



X-O-WATTER 599 

"Pull off the pulp-mill as quick as you can," 
he directed. "The Morris man has got the head- 
gates on his dam shut — see that watt-meter? We 
're taking his plant on as a motor." 

When Jed came out of the telephone booth he 
was trembling all over. His face was the color 
of putty and his knees shook. "The Morris man 
said that he had the head-gate shut," he said. 

Fred considerately kept his back to him while 
he dropped off the Morris plant and oiled the 
bearings two or three times apiece. 

Jed finally breathed easier and his color came 
back. "A little nervous?" asked Fred. 

'Well, a little," admitted Jed. "I thought two 
or three times the Morris plant would have to go." 

"I never thought so at all," said Fred. "All we 
had to do was to keep our heads and hustle. I '11 
sleep a few minutes now ; if the place starts to fall 
to pieces, why wake me up again." 

As Fred came down from the loft the next 
morning, Jed announced: 

"I 've got those bearings running cool again. 
Doctor Jaynes called up and said we burned up 
all the lamps in his office." 

"We '11 hear a lot of that, but let the Morris 
plant replace them — they 're out of it cheap." 
He grinned a little. "When I was a little boy, 
Mother got me a dandy book, 'Jack the Giant 
Killer,' I 've got it yet. 1 remember in the fights 
Jack always came out ahead, standing with one 
foot on the dead giant and waving his sword. 
Now in this picture you want to send your mother, 
you could stand with one foot on the water-wheel 
and the other on the framework of the switch- 
board ; they 're a good ways apart, but T guess you 
can make it. I '11 take the handle off the circuit- 
breaker for you to wave.' We '11 name it 'Jack the 
Kill-O-Watter.'" 

"Aw, quit it!" Jed blushed clear around 
behind his ears. "I 'm going to get at that 
studying — just going right after it for fair. I 'm 
nothing but a starter and a stopper." 



APPLE BLOSSOMS 

By DON C. SE1TZ 



Each spring they come with gentle blush 

Like fairies in the night, 
Decking the dark and scraggy boughs 

In bloom of beauty bright. 

With scent of rarest, sweet perfume, 
They call the busy bees 



To labor from the dawn till dusk 
Among the apple-trees. 

Short be their days of sunny life, 
Until, like flakes of snow, 

They flutter to the kindly earth, 
And then the apples grow! 



AESOP'S FABLES 




THE FOX AND THE C ROW 



A Crow once stole a piece of cheese, 
And, to enjoy it at her ease, 
Flew to the top of a high tree. 
A Fox who, passing, chanced to see, 
Resolved to exercise his wit 
And win from her the dainty hit 
That in her beak she held so tight. 
"My dear," said he, with smile polite, 
"I never was aware till now 



How perfect is your form, nor how 
Superb your plumage. Had your voice 
An equal charm, I should rejoice 
To hear you sing!" At that the Crow, 
Parting her beak to sing, let go 
The piece of cheese, and saw her prize 
Snapped up before her very eyes, 
And heard the Fox's parting jeer — 
"Don't trouble now to caiv, my dear!" 



THE DOG IN THE MANGER 



A selfish Dog used for his bed 
The manger where the oxen fed ; 
And while he could not eat the hay 
Himself, by growling drove away 
The hungry oxen. Now, although 
That Dog died centuries ago, 



His evil name will never be 
Forgotten. For when people see 
Such selfishness as his, they say, 
"Dog in the manger," to this day. 
And of such creatures there are more 
That go on two legs than on four. 




600 



AESOP'S FABLES 



THE WIND AND THE- SUN 



The Wind and Sun once fell into 
A heated argument, which grew 
Each day more bitter. Wind and 
Sun 

Each claimed to be the stronger one. 
Finding that neither one would 
make 

The least concession, for the sake 
Of peace, the two agreed at length 
Upon a trial of their strength. 
"You see that Traveler," said the 
Sun, 

"On yonder road? which ever one 
The sooner forces him to strip 
His cloak off, wins the champion- 
ship!" 

The Wind, rejoicing in a fight, 
Sprang up and blew with all his 
might, 

Quite confident that he would win. 
But very soon, to his chagrin, 
He found the harder that he blew, 
The Traveler more tightly drew 
His cloak about him. One last puff 
He gave, then shouted in a huff : 
"I give it up; it can't be done!" 
Then, with a smile, arose the Sun 
And beamed his brightest on the Man, 
So that he presently began 
To feel his cloak; then bit by bit, 
As he grew warmer, loosened it. 
At last he threw it off. "You win!" 
Exclaimed the Wind. "I now begin 
To see the light! I thought till now 
That everything to force must bow; 
But you compel me to admit 
Persuasion has the best of it!" 




Are softer far!" This was too much 
For Pussy. With a flattered "Mew!" 
She reached into the fire and drew 
A chestnut out. The hot coals seared 
Her paw, but Pussy persevered 
Till she had pulled out every one. 
Then turning round to gaze upon 
The chestnuts, found that there was no 
Just empty shells! All Pussy had 
Were burns and the reflection sad 
That she had singed her paws to feed 
Her folly and the Monkey's greed. 



THE CAT, THE MON- 
KEY, AND THE 
CHESTNUTS 

A Monkey and a Cat one day 

Were sitting by the hearth, 
where lay 

Some chestnuts roasting. "By 
the way," 

Exclaimed the Ape, "I never 

saw <\* 

A Cat with such a perfect paw * 

For pulling chestnuts from a "m 
fire ; ■m*. 

And though I always did ad- 
mire 

Our Master's hands, yours to 
the touch 




602 



AESOP'S FABLES 




THE FOX 

AND 
THE LION 



A Fox who never, strange to say, 
I lad seen the King of Beasts, one day 
Beheld a Lion. At the sight 
He very nearly died of fright. 
The second time he met the King- 
He felt a sort of shivering 



THE HARES AND 
THE FROGS 

Once all the Hares in Hare- 

dom got 
Together to bewail their lot, 
And one and all agreed that 

what 

With being hounded, snared 

and shot, 
And chased and worried, life 

was not 

Worth living. So, lest worse befall, 
Resolved at once to end it all, 
They rushed up a steep rock to throw 
Themselves into the lake below. 
Hearing them come, the Frogs beside 
The water's edge, leapt, terrified 
Into the lake. Seeing their fright, 



Sensation up and down his spine, 

But outwardly he showed no sign. 

The third time they met face to face, 

The Fox showed not the slightest trace 

Of fear, but bold as anything 

Walked up and said, "Good morning, King!' 




A Hare exclaimed: "Brothers, our plight 
Is not so bad. Now we have found 
A folk who fear the very sound 
Of our approach, let us," he said, 
"Take courage in the thought that we, 
The scorn of Alan and Bird and Beast, 
Are heroes to the Frogs, at least !" 




A Gnat, once chancing to alight, 
After a long and weary flight, 
Upon a Bullock's horn to rest, 
With a loud buzzing thus addressed 
The Bullock: "Pray, good Sir, allow 
Me to express my thanks; and now 



THE GNAT 
AND 
THE BULLOCK 



If you don't mind, I '11 fly away, 
Unless you 'd rather have me slay." 
"Pray do whatever you decide; 
'T is all the same to me," replied 
The Bullock; "I was not aware, 
Until you spoke, that you were there." 




KIT, PAT, AND A FEW BOYS 

By BETH B. GILCHRIST 

Author of "Cinderella's Granddaughter" 



CHAPTER I 

WHEN EMERGENCY CALLS 

The calm of the big pink-and-gray room overlook- 
ing the park was stirred to unwonted activity. 
Waves of silk and chiffon and velvet reared rain- 
bow-colored crests above couches and chairs; 
white foam of linen and lingerie capped the tables. 
Near the center of the room, two wardrobe trunks 
and a steamer gaped capably open. Between 
chairs and tables and couches a small, swift- 
tooted woman moved hurriedly, her nervous ges- 
tures churning the medley to a seemingly worse 
confusion. A tall gray-eyed girl stood by the 
trunks, quietly catching what the little woman 
tossed her and slipping them on the hangers. 

"There! that 's the last dress. Jane, you can put 
these things back. Marie's young man might have 
waited twenty-four hours, I should think. If 
you are invalided home from the American troops 
on the Rhine, there is no special point in being 
married the minute your boat bumps the pier. 
Jane, are there an}' more shoes in the closet?" 

"I see shoes under the window," interposed the 
quiet girl. 

The little woman whirled about. "You would 
make a good lady's maid, Kit. I had no notion 
you were so capable. Why don't you apply for 
Marie's job?" 

"You would n't take me," said the girl, deftly 
folding silk petticoats. "Ever since Aunt Isa- 
belle's telegram came asking you to sail with her 
to-morrow for Bermuda, have n't you been trying 
(o dispose of me otherwise?" 

"But I can't take you, Kit. Nobody knows how 
long Isabelle may have to stay in Bermuda, if she 
is actually sick — though I can't believe what she 
says the doctor says. Isabelle's health has always 
been a Rock of Gibraltar — invulnerable. And if 
it is n't, don't you see I really could n't take you 
to Bermuda — " 

"Oh, I don't want to go, Mother." The tall 
girl captured a pile of silk stockings and began 
tilling a drawer in one of the trunks. "Why can't 
I stay here?" 

"Because I should n't feel easy a single minute 
to know you were alone in this house with nobody 
but the servants." 

"I should n't mind. But I don't care particu- 
larly about staying. It struck me as the easiest 
way out, that is all." 

"It is no way out." The little woman paused, 



both hands full of laces, like a bird hovering for 
a moment in arrested flight. "Did you send that 
telegram to Aunt Marcia?" 
"Not yet, Mother." 

"Then we may as well stop packing so fever- 
ishly. I shall never in the world take this next 
train." 

"Oh, I think we can make it." 

"But what about you? Here is Don on a ranch 
in Wyoming for the summer and your father's busi- 
ness may keep him two months longer in Alaska. 
Miss Bird's brother's wife is in a sanatorium and 
Miss Bird is taking care of the children. We have 
always counted on her to come here and look af- 
ter you and Don whenever I wanted to be away. 
And now — Why, I can't go, Kitten, until we 
hear from Aunt Marcia." 

"You must go." The girl's fingers were busy 
among the laces. 

"Tell me how, with the Hendersons at the 
shore, the Bixbys in California, and your Uncle 
Edwin's house quarantined for scarlet fever. If 
for any reason Aunt Marcia can't have you — " 

"I don't see how there can possibly be any 
reason against her having me, Mother. We used 
to visit at her house nearly every year when I was 
small." 

The little woman hesitated. "She wrote this 
spring to ask when we were coming again. Tele- 
phone a telegram this minute, Puss. There may 
be time for her to answer before my train." 

"There could n't be, Mother. I '11 do it the 
minute you are off." 

"I will wait for the sleeper. She may not be 
at home, dear. So many people seem not to be 
at home this summer." 

"But, Mother, Great-aunt Marcia is always at 
home. Did n't I hear Father say once that she 
had n't slept outside that house for twenty years?" 

"So he did. Oh, my white slippers! Give them 
to Miss Katherine, Jane, and then take away all 
the things on these chairs. Perhaps Aunt Marcia 
could n't leave home now if she wished. Her 
health — It seems safe enough — I will take this 
train after all, Puss. Can you finish here alone?" 

"Easily. And I '11 call the expressman." 

"Then I will see Mary and John and leave 
directions about caring for the place while 1 am 
gone. Mary must keep one housemaid at hand, 
in case your father comes home suddenly. Ask 
Jane to lay out my things." 

"I '11 get them ready myself, Mother." 



603 



604 



KIT, PAT, AND A FEW" BOYS 



The little lady clicked away on her satin slip- 
pers, dainty, brisk, and efficient. Katherine called 
the express-office, finished packing, locked the 
trunks, and assembled hat, gloves, and shoes in 
the dressing-room. She was stocking a gray 
leather writing-case with paper and stamps when 
her mother came back. 

"Here is your letter of credit. They just sent it 
up from the bank." 

"Good." The little woman darted across the 
room to a rosewood desk. "How much money 
have you, Kit?" 

"Not much. I never have at the end of the 
month." 

"Here is fifty. Your allowance will be paid as 
usual, of course. If you need more, write Judge 
Howe. I called up Grace Lansing and invited her 
to dinner. She will spend the night, too. Ask 
any of the girls you like. Oh, and after you have 
packed me off, telegraph Madame Toussaud to 
find a maid by eight to-morrow who will go with 
• me to Bermuda. Her New York address is in this 
little red book. How much time have we?" 
"Half an hour." 

"Not a minute too much. That 's right, but- 
ton my shoes while I fasten these hooks. If I had 
known what a worker you are — The express- 
men, Jane? You see to them, Puss." 

"When the currants is ripe, Mrs. Embury," 
said a voice at the door, "shall I make jell the 
same as if you had told me?" 

"Everything as usual, Mary, exactly as though 
I had left explicit directions." 

By the car John waited. "About that consign- 
ment of irises, Mrs. Embury — " 

"Put them in just as we planned last week, 
John." 

At the final moment Jane flew down the path 
with a forgotten umbrella. 

The door of the limousine closed softly and the 
car rolled away carrying its occupants to a fran- 
tic dash from ticket-office to baggage-room and 
to the steps of an already signaled train. There 
was only time for the little woman to kiss her 
tall daughter once. 

"Telegraph me to-morrow morning, Kit. I 
shall not set foot on that boat till I know you are 
off for Aunt Marcia's." 

Katherine retraced her steps to the car, an 
unwonted warmth at her heart. The absence of 
Marie had made it really exciting to get Mother 
off. As the car sped back through the wide, 
shaded streets the girl spread out her fingers on 
her lap and regarded them curiously. Those 
fingers had accomplished a number of unfamiliar 
things in the last hour and a half. Of course, she 
was sorry that Aunt Isabelle was ill; but, equally 
of course, Aunt Isabelle would presently get well. 



[May 

Meanw hile, which of the girls should she invite to 
spend the night with her? They were all so nice, 
she reflected coolly, that it did not matter whom 
she asked, and went upstairs to let Jane help her 
pack her trunks and to dress for dinner in the 
first gown that came to hand. Then Miss Lansing 
arrived and the)' strolled on the terrace, talking of 
Aunt Isabelle and Mother's hasty departure and 
Marie's homing soldier; and after that, dinner 
was announced, and she had not telephoned 
anybody. 

Not until after dinner did she remember her 
promise to her mother. "There, I forgot to tele- 
graph Aunt Marcia!" she thought suddenly. 

Miss Lansing's fingers were running plaintively 
over the keys in the music-room. Miss Lansing 
was a big, jolly, rubicund person with a passion 
for doleful music. 

Katherine left her with a murmured excuse. 
Her hand on the telephone-receiver, she paused. 
"I can't send a message to-night. Aunt Marcia 
goes to bed early. I '11 do it the first thing in the 
morning." 

She replaced the receiver on its hook and 
strolled into the library. Miss Lansing, she knew, 
would be happy at the piano indefinitely. The 
girl idled among the book-shelves, her eye scan- 
ning the titles. In the end she took none of them. 
Where there were so many which she felt a tem- 
perate inclination to read, it seemed hardly worth 
while actually to begin one. 

A big chair held out inviting leather arms and 
she drifted into it. Save for Miss Lansing's sad. 
wandering airs, the house was very still. Another 
girl might have found it lonely. Katherine Em- 
bury was used to sudden flittings; to a house full 
of people one week, almost empty the next. Her 
thoughts ran back over the kaleidoscope of the 
day's happenings and on to the morrow's journey. 
She did not particularly anticipate a summer at 
Great-aunt Marcia's, but the knowledge failed to 
dismay her. Anticipation, like fear, Katherine 
conceived to be a sensation one outgrew with one's 
little girlhood. 

She probed her memory for recollections of 
Aunt Marcia's. There had been a garden and 
books, miles and miles of books, as she had 
thought then. Goats, too. Don had bullied and 
bossed them, but they had secretly frightened 
his sister. The sensation still tasted strong under 
her tongue. That had been before Father had 
so much money, when Mother used to make 
one's birthday cake with her own hands and let 
one help with the frosting. She and Don had done 
things together then, Katherine remembered, 
when he would let her. How she had adored her 
"big" brother! Two years make a far wider 
seniority over seven than sixteen. The}- were 



I92t] 



KIT, PAT, AND A FEW BOYS 



605 



quite of an age now, but she seemed to do very 
little with Don. He was away at college most of 
the year; and even when he was at home, there 
was no time. Katherine had a vague suspicion 
that life had been, on the whole, more interesting 
in those earlier years. Not that she found fault 
with it now. How could a girl find fault with 
what gave her everything she desired even before 
she desired it? 

It was nine years since they last went to Aunt 
Marcia's, who had been ill much of the time 
since. Now the doctors pronounced her cured. 
Katherine thought of the little brown wisp of a 
woman with the big restless black eyes who was 
her great-aunt and wondered dispassionately 
what kind of a summer she was going to have. 

In her white embroidered gown, her hands quiet 
in her lap, Katherine Embury made a pretty 
picture in the big leather chair. Her slenderness 
covered a fine lithe strength, supple and con- 
trolled. Her gray eyes looked out steadfastly, a 
trifle uninterestedly, above the delicate flush of 
her cheeks. Her brown hair rippled with dainty 
vigor about her small fine head. Yet as she sat 
there thinking, she looked inexplicably not quite 
alive, a creature not cold, but waiting, like a 
sleeping princess untouched as yet by the lips of 
life. 

If you had told her that she did not know the 
taste of real living, Katherine would have opened 
her gray eyes wider in a pretty, astonished stare 
and laughed an uncomprehending, well-bred 
little laugh of frank amusement. But she did not. 
Life for her was swaddled in too many things for 
her to know its true savor. She had too many 
clothes to care which she wore, too many books 
to wish to read any, too much to do to find out 
what she liked doing, too many friends to love 
any supremely. She was starving on a surfeit. 
She had not a want in the world, and she did n't 
know it was normal to have wants. 

Yet there had been a savor in this afternoon's 
business. Sitting quietly in her big leather chair, 
the girl tried to grasp it, failed, and let the sensa- 
tion float vaguely into an elusive consciousness 
that it had been a surprisingly pleasant afternoon. 
Then Miss Lansing's music sobbed itself into 
silence and Miss Lansing's cheerful voice queried, 
"Here in the dark, Kitten?" 

"In the library in the light," said Katherine. 

The next morning she tumbled out of bed to 
telephone two telegrams. The first was to Great- 
aunt Marcia: "Mother called suddenly to Ber- 
muda. May I spend the summer with you? 
Expect me at five. Katherine Embury." 

The second was addressed to her mother: 
"Leaving at eight for Aunt Marcia's. Hope you 
have good sailing. Love to Aunt Isabelle. K." 



CHAPTER II 

THE JOURNEY'S END 

Twelve hours later, Katherine Embury stepped 
from a hot red-plush train at Aunt Marcia's 
station. 

Her eyes ran quickly over the lines of waiting 
faces. Was Mrs. Burton still Aunt Marcia's 
housekeeper and did she yet wear the funny jet- 
black "fringe" that gave her face such a misfit 
look? But perhaps Mrs. Burton had not been 
able to meet her and "Tim" could not leave his 




"KATHERINE EMBURY MADE A PRETTY PICTURE 
IN THE BIG LEATHER CHAIR" 



horses — Aunt Marcia always insisted on young, 
high-stepping horses. The girl walked quickly 
through the waiting-room and surveyed the line 
of smart cars drawn up at the street curb. Be- 
hind them straggled a few hacks of uncertain 
vintage. 

"Taxi, lady?" 

"Carriage?" 

"Let me take you up, lady." 
"Can you tell me which is Miss Brunt's car?" 
"Elm Street, lady? I '11 take you to Miss 
Brunt's, lady." 



606 



KIT, PAT, AND A FEW BOYS 



She shook her head and returned, thoroughly 
to canvass the station. Nine years is a long time; 
she had grown unrecognizably. Tim, as -well as 
Mrs. Burton, might have a successor. It would he 
odd if there were really no one here to meet her. 
Then she remembered that the train had been 
late and she went back to the diminished line of 
hackmen. Her delay had cost her the only taxi 
and all but the shabbiest of the hacks. 

The man knew "Miss Brunt's place'' very well. 
He proceeded to bump and rattle and bang the 
girl thither with a disconcerting shakiness that 
made her wonder whether he was reviving the 
drama of the "One Hoss Shay." "Don't look as 
though anybody was to home, Miss." 

It did not; there was no denying the terrifying 
appearance. Not a window was open, not a door 
stood wide. Awnings were up, but the porches 
were as empty of furniture as of the litter that 
might be expected to accumulate at an empty 
house. Despite the deceptive trimness of lawn 
and shrubbery, the place had an air of saying, 
"The people who live here are away from home." 
"You may wait," said the girl, quietly. 
In a dozen steps she traversed the brick path 
from the white gate to the paneled door and 
pushed the bell. Some one would come. Some 
one must come. However the house had contrived 
to look, Aunt Marcia was here. Not a night out- 
side this roof for twenty years — Father had said 
so. Katherine's ringer jammed the button into 
the wall again and again with stubborn energy. 

Silence met her, the lonely, waiting silence of 
an unoccupied house. A horrid thought assailed 
the girl's brain. Could Aunt Marcia be dead? 
But surely some one would have sent word. A 
cat brushed against her ankles, and she jumped. 
Where there was a cat there were surely people — 
old turbaned Nancy, perhaps, in the kitchen. 
Katherine skirted the house, trying the side door 
011 the way. Like all the other doors, the kitchen 
door was locked. 

The girl's heart dropped with a queer, sicken- 
ing sensation quite new to her experience. It was 
after six o'clock at night. She was hot and hun- 
gry and tired in a strange place where the only 
person whose name, even, she remembered was 
Aunt Marcia. And Aunt Marcia was not at 
home. And Mother was on her way to Bermuda. 

Slow ly, w ith bewildered feet, trying desperately 
to think what to do, Katherine took her way back 
along the brick path that bounded the house. 
To the right, approached by turf-steps, lay the 
garden, a blaze of color. 

Was some one cutting roses? The cat, tail 
erect, frolicked down the grassy steps and under 
the rustic gate. The girl followed, her wonted 
1 >< iisc reestablished. 



IMay 

"Good evening. Is the house really closed?" 
Her voice lifted the question quietly, yet with an 
undernotc of anxiety. It was a lovely voice, as 
exquisitely trained as the speaker's self, and it 
touched the fragrant air with swift charm. 

The rose-cutter turned her head in pleased sur- 
prise, turned her whole body, smiling in frank 
admiration. Katherine saw that she, too, was 
a girl, and of about her own age, a girl in a short 
white skirt and a pink blouse, a girl with big brown 
eyes and brown curb- hair and a piquant gipsy face. 

"Oh," said the brown-eyed girl, "I did n't hear 
you coming. Yes, the house is closed. M'iss 
Brunt is away, you know." 
"Out of town, you mean?" 
"She started Monday for Seattle." 
"Seattle!" A dozen emotions struggled for 
mastery of the single word. "Why, she has n't 
slept out of this house for twenty years! I mean 
Miss Marcia Brunt." 

"So do 1. She amazed everybody. Decided to 
go just three day s before she started. Mother 
says she used to be like that, quick as a flash to 
do things. And she is very well now, you know. 
Shesaid she thought twenty years was long enough 
to stay at home on a stretch. Miss Weld is with 
her, an old school-friend. Oh, does it matter? 
Is anything wrong?" The swift speech ended 
anxiously. 

Katherine gave a queer little mirthless laugh. 
"Not in the least wrong, except that I thought I 
was going to spend the summer here. She is my 
aunt, you know." 

"Your aunt? You are n't— Oh, are you 
Katherine Embury?" 

"Why yes, but I am afraid that I — " 
"We used to play together," cried the gipsy- 
faced girl, impetuously, "when we were little 
and you used to visit Miss Brunt! It was stupid 
ol me not to know you at once. I 've been so 
hoping you 'd come again. I 'm Patsy — Patricia 
\\ ard. They used to call me Pat, and sometimes 
they do still." A dimple punctuated the words. 

It was not in Katherine Embury to pretend to 
remember when she did not; but suddenly, 
looking into the bright, joyous face, she discovered 
that she wished she could. 

Patricia forestalled her apologies. "You don't 
remember me, do you? But I wish you did, 
because of course, for to-night, you 're coming 
home with me." 

"Oh, thank you. But I can go to a hotel, if 
you will tell me the best one." 

"I 'd hate to go to a hotel alone." 
"I never tried it," Katherine acknowledged. 
"Don't begin now," said Patricia, promptly. 
"Mother was a friend of your mother's. They 
were girls together. She will love In have you." 



10-' l] 



KIT, PAT, AND A FEW BOYS 



607 



"It is very good of you," murmured the other. 
"There is a man out in the street with my bag. 
W here shall I tell him to go?" 

Patricia glanced over the hedge. "I '11 tell him. 
Wait here just a minute." 

Katherine was con- 
scious of a sense of intense 
relief, coupled with the 
knowledge that the relief 
was merely temporary. 
After to-night — what? 
Her head whirled. Home? 
Then Mother would take 
the first boat from the 
islands, leaving Aunt 
Isabelle. But Aunt Isa- 
belle had declared Moth- 
er's company a condition 
of her summer in Ber- 
muda. It was all hope- 
lessly involved. If there 
were anywhere, anywhere 
except home to go to — 
She thought wildly of 
friends, schoolmates. 
They and their families 
were on the point of 
scattering to the winds 
of summer, at ocean, 
lake, and mountain. Not 
a girl she knew well but 
was flitting somewhere. 

"It must be terribly 
discouraging," said Pa- 
tricia's voice at her elbow, 
"to travel so far to get 
to a place only to have 
lo turn around and go 
back." 

"But I can't go back," 
Katherine said. "There 's 
nobody at home except 
servants. Though I don't 
see where else I can go, 
cither. 1 don't quite see 
what I can do at all." 

The words surprised 
herself. It was not like 
her (o confide in stran- 
gers. This sweet, bright 
friendliness had broken 
unaware into her reserve. 
Once spoken, she could 
There was nothing to do 



"And so here I am," finished Katherine, even!) . 
"And 1 haye n't the remotest idea what to do next." 

"Mother will tell us," Patricia said, with con- 
viction. "But how ihrilUngl Perhaps it 's more 
thrilling than nice. Is it?" 




'THE ROSE-CUTTER TURNED IN PLEASED SURPRISE. SMILING IN 
FRANK ADMIRATION" 



not recall her words, 
but to go on. Excite- 
ment grew on the gipsy face as the two girls slipped 
through a gate in the rose hedge, crossed a lane, 
turned a corner, and entered a street of comfort- 
able, unpretentious houses. 



"Yes," Katherine acknowledged, "I think it is." 

Patricia slipped her arm through the other girl's 
and squeezed ever so slightly. "We '11 take care 
of you. You won't mind rooming with me, will 
you? We are all at home now, you see, and there 
are so many of us that the house is pretty full." 



608 



KIT, PAT, AND A FEW BOYS 



Katherine did mind; her preference was to 
room alone. She wondered how it would seem to 
share a bed. Then she became aware of gay voices 
and of a broad veranda full of people. A pair of 
deep, quiet eyes looked into hers; afterward she 
could not remember what color they were. She 
had a vague impression of height and strength, of 
rippling dark hair, and a face chiseled with fine 
lines that yet were beautiful; an impression, not 
vague at all, of restfulness and refreshment. A 
firm warm hand held hers, a pleasant voice spoke 
words welcoming her "mother's daughter," while 
Patricia's eager tones rippled through a scant half- 
dozen sentences of explanation that yet managed 
completely to convey the scene in Miss Brunt's 
garden. 

"Take her upstairs, Pat," said the pleasant 
voice. "We will have supper in half an hour." 

And Katherine mounted after Patricia, wonder- 
ing what there was about mothers that made them 
feel alike to tired girls, despite such sheer differ- 
ence as existed between the tall, worn-faced lady 
with the wonderful eyes and her own vivacious 
little velvet-skinned mother. 

As she tossed hat and gloves on the bed of the 
tiny blue room into which Patricia led her, she 
remembered that there had been another lady on 
the porch, a man, big and broad and clean-shaven, 
three jolly-looking boys, and a little girl, all hair- 
bow and long legs. 

"I 've drawn your bath warm," said Patricia, 
"and here are fresh towels. They get all mixed 
up with the boys' if we leave them in the bath- 
room so I always bring mine in here. I '11 be 
back in time to hook you up." 

Downstairs one of the boys vaulted over the 
veranda rail, just missing the bed of ferns under- 
neath. "If supper 's put oft' half an hour, we might 
as well finish packing our kit, fellows." 

Pat bounded through the door, her curls bob- 
bing. "Oh, Mother, I did n't tell you the whole 
of it! She's stranded, completely stranded! Could 
n't we take her to camp with us to-morrow?" 

"To cam])? Whoopee/" The boy on the path 
affected to fall over himself. 

"Take a girl like that to the wilds of Ver- 
mont?" demanded one of the two on the porch. 
"You 're crazy, Pat." 

"I 'm not, Fred. Why would it be crazy?" 
"Bough beds for a girl like that? Not on your 
life, Pat!" 

Upstairs in the blue bedroom Katherine Em- 
bury buttoned herself into a white gown and won- 
dered with more than ordinary interest what she 
would be doing to-morrow night at this hour. 
For the first time in her life she found herself 
unable to predict with the slightest hope of accu- 
racy the happenings of her immediate future. 



IMav 



CHAPTER III 

A CHANGE OF PLAN 



"Pat," said Mrs. Ward, softly, drawing the girl 
down beside her on the uppermost step of the 
latticed back porch, "how much do you want to 
go to camp to-morrow?" 

"More than tongue can tell," Pat answered 
promptly. 

"I was afraid so, dear." Mrs. Ward patted the 
hand on her knee. "I had a notion that perhaps 
you and I might stay here and let the others go 
on to-morrow. Possibly a little later we could 
■follow them, in case— The situation is too in- 
definite to put exactly." 

^ Patricia stared at her mother. "Not go to camp? 
You don't mean— You can't mean that we 
ought not to ask Katherine Embury to go with 
us to the woods!" Genuine amazement looked 
out of the gipsy face. 

"What do you think yourself, daughter?" 
"I think it would be perfectly grand to have 
her." 

"For us or for her?" 

"Why, for everybody." Pat was silent a 
minute. "Of course, she could n't go in those 
clothes." 

"I doubt if she has any other kind with her." 
"Could n't she get some?" 
"Undoubtedly, if camp is the place for her." 
"Oh, Mother, don't tell me you 're like the boys 
and think she must be horrid and fussy inside 
because she is so pretty outside." 

"I think nothing of the sort, Pat. But the 
clothes count for something, dear. They indi- 
cate the kind of life she has always been used to. 
I doubt if she has ever washed a dish in her life. 
I am certain she has never carried a pail of water. 
The hardships that go with camp life she knows 
nothing about. I took occasion to ask her if she 
had ever camped out." 

"Camp is n't hardship, Mother. It 's fun." 
"To us, yes, because we like living in an old 
skirt or two and a flannel waist or a few plain 
jumpers, sleeping on boughs, and eating from 
wooden plates simple food that we cook ourselves 
on an old camp stove. The life we live in camp, 
Pat, is life stripped close to the bone, and some 
people can't take it at all cheerfully that way. 
We like tramping and fishing and rowing, and 
some people find no pleasure in them. I own 
that our guest's sophisticated clothes may have 
no connection with her personal tastes, but I 
have not seen enough of her to be able to judge 
what her tastes are. If she were not happy in 
camp, would it have been kind in us to ask her? 
We know what camp life is; she does n't. Aiid 
under the circumstances she can hardly refuse 



KIT, PAT, AND A FEW BOYS 



609 



our invitation. You see she is completely at our 
mercy." 

"I see," said Pat, slowly. 

"If you did n't like camp life — Imagine it! 
Some perfectly nice girls don't." 

"Bess Haynes did n't last summer. That was 
awful, was n't it? I see what you mean, Mother. 
But — but — we 're all ready." 

"Equally ready to stay at home, dear, as far as 
our wardrobes are concerned. Your aunt will 
take care of Marian and your father and the boys 
don't actually need us." 

Pat's face was very grave. "But what if, after 
you got to know her a little better, you should 
decide that Katherine Embury would n't like 
camp? Should we have to stay home all sum- 
mer?" 

"That is a bridge I have n't yet crossed. A 
great many things may happen in a week." 

"You need camp, Mother. You know how 
well it always makes you feel." 

"I know, too, that when I was a girl Katherine 
Embury's mother was my dearest friend." 

"Do you want me to say that we will stay here?" 

"No, Pat. I am asking what you think we 
would better do — what we can do." 

Patricia drew a long breath. Through the 
house from the front veranda floated gay talk 
and laughter. She could distinguish Phil's level, 
close-clipped speech, though she could not catch 
the words. Fred's deep tones boomed now and 
then, and Nick's higher-keyed voice cut in with 
a phrase or two. They were having a very good 
time out there. There was always a good time 
where the boys were. And she had been counting 
the days until to-morrow when she and they would 
begin to have the world to themselves again as 
they used to have it. No college, no high school, 
no anything to interfere. How could any one ask 
her to take five, six, who knew how many days out 
of this blissful summer and give them away to a 
girl with whom she had once played tag, a girl 
who had not remembered that such a person as 
Patricia Ward existed? 

The girl swallowed hard on a lump in her throat. 
"If you are willing, Mother, I think we would bet- 
ter stay," she said firmly. 

Her mother kissed her. "Thank you, dear. I 
don't see how we could turn her out. It would 
make me very unhappy to do that." 

Pat nodded soberly. "I found her. And I had 
been wishing for years that she would come here 
again. So now it seems to be up to me to be de- 
cent about it." She squeezed her mother. "I 'm 
glad you are n't in Bermuda." 

"I am glad I am not. I would much rather be 
here by my nice little daughter." 

"Not very nice, Mother." 



"Quite superlatively nice, Pat. I am proud of 
you. Now I suppose we shall have to go in and 
break the news in as stealthy a manner as possible 
to our trusting family." 

An hour later Phil cornered Pat on the back 
stairs as she was slipping down to the refrigerator 
for a glass of water. 

"Look here," he demanded abruptly, "what 's 
this Mother tells me about you two not going to 
camp to-morrow?" 

Pat shook her head. "Not to-morrow. We '11 
be coming on in a few days, Phil. That is," she 
added honestly, "I hope we will." 

"If you don't, I '11 cut for home and get you. 
It 's that girl, I suppose." 

"I don't think that is a very nice way to speak 
of a guest, Phil." 

"Bother a guest! Nobody asked her." 

"I did ; and now Mother." Pat's heart lightened 
at the genuine disgust in her brother's tone, light- 
ened enough to let a teasing imp into her voice. 
"It sounded as though you were having a pretty 
good time with her to-night." 

"Huh! No reason for singing glory hallelujah 
when she breaks up our summer. Look here, 
Patrick Henry, you and I have got a few things on 
for the next two months." 

"Don't I know it?" There was not even a 
pretense of fun in the girl's voice now. "Oh, Phil, 
I could cry, I feel so badly! Do you think you 
would mind, very much, if I should cry?" 

"April showers make May flowers," chanted 
Phil, gravely, depositing himself on the step 
above his sister where he relapsed into deep 
gloom. "It 's a shame, Pat. When a fellow has 
been away from home all the year, he likes to see 
his family the little time there 's left." 

"He does n't want it any more than his family 
wants to see him. Where 's Nick?" 

"Ruffles went in search of the punch-bag. 
Said he had to get something out of his system 
before he slept. A good idea!" commended Phil. 
"I 'd like a few rounds myself." 

Pat, returning with the glass of water to the 
blue bedroom, found her guest almost asleep. 

"Thank you," Katherine murmured drowsily, 
as she handed back the glass. "Does it matter, 
particularly, where I lie down? I can't promise 
you where I may wake up." 

Brushing her hair at the glass, Pat watched 
the other girl draw up the covers and fall almost 
instantly asleep, her cheek cushioned on an 
outflung arm. 

"How tired she must have been!" Pat thought. 
And again, "How pretty she is! And I am like 
that chair to her, a piece of furniture that makes 
the situation livable, that 's all. I wonder when 
she will really begin to see me." 



(To be continued) 



THF HARBOR AND MOLE AT BATUM 



PIRATES OF THE BLACK SEA 



It is a long while ago since Captain Kidd and his 
crew of cutlass-armed pirates coursed the Spanish 
main in their black-flagged vessel, but the days 
of adventure and romance are not past. Sea- 
faring brigands still sail the high seas and strike 
terror to the hearts of unwary travelers. 

Such an adventure as might have befallen a 
knight in a story-book took place in the Black 
Sea a year ago this month, with two American 
boys, William and John Haskell, sons of Colonel 
Haskell, High Commissioner to Armenia and 
chief representative of the Near East Relief, 
playing the leading parts. The boys were on 
their way home with their mother. They had 
sailed from Batum, a seaport on the eastern 
shore of the Black Sea, on a little French packet- 
steamer, the Suirah, along with two other Ameri- 
cans, bound for the United States. 

As the little vessel steamed out of Batum har- 
bor, with the sun shining bright on her glistening 
decks and the little white-tipped waves bobbing 
up and down beneath her bows, the two boys 
drew a long sigh. Their year of excitement was 
over. Glad as they would be to see their own 
country once more, still, this year in the Near 
East had been a Aery interesting one. Always 
there had been something new and different, 
something of which they could tell their friends 
back home with great pride, something every 
boy did not see. And they were a little sorry 
that it was all over. 

For a long time the boys stood together on the 
deck, watching the outlines of the land grow 
dimmer in the distance. 

"Nothin' much '11 ever happen to us again, I 
suppose," said William, mournfully. 

"Just school an' studyin' an' things," responded 
his brother; "no fun in that." 

"Wish there 'd be a submarine or somethin'!" 
exclaimed William, with sudden inspiration. 
"Guess if we 're almost blown up by one o' them, 
the fellows 'ud think it was pretty fine." 

610 



"Yes, but there are n't any more submarines," 
replied John, scornfully. "There is n't any more 
anything, I tell you— just ridin' home on this 
little French boat and then goin' back to school 
Of course," he added, "there may be some pretty 
good hikes and campin' parties, but that is n't 
like battles. Gee! I wish one more real thing 
would happen, somethin' that never happened 
before, and then I 'd just as soon go back home." 

"Urn," mumbled William, and the two boys 
stumbled in to dinner. 

It was later that night, when darkness had 
fallen about the little ship until nothing but the 
narrow beam from the Suirah' s searchlight could 
be seen, that the something happened. 

John and William had gone to their state-room. 
Everything was quiet on board; nothing could be 
heard but the steady chug-chugging of the engine 
and the swish of the waves against the ship's side. 

Then suddenly there came a sharp, startled cry 
from the stern of the vessel, followed by hoarse 
shouts, then a sound of shuffling and a quick 
hurrying of feet through the passageways suc- 
ceeded by a terrible stillness. Even the sound of 
the engines stopped! John and William stood 
motionless, scarcely daring to breathe, their 
hearts thumping like mad. Finally John found 
his voice. "Mother," he said as bravely as he 
could, "what is the matter?" 

But before his mother, in the adjoining state- 
room, could answer, there came a great pounding 
at the door and a rough voice called something in 
a loud, commanding tone. The two boys stared 
at each other, their feet rooted to the spot. Now 
was their chance to show how brave they could 
be, but what could they do? If whoever was on 
the outside tried to batter down the door, as it 
seemed he would, they would not be strong enough 
to prevent him. They could only stand by. their 
mother and show this terrible person that they 
were not afraid. 

Just then the door burst open, and even the 



PIRATES OF THE BLACK SEA 



611 



courage of the American boys wavered at the 
sight that greeted them. A black-masked figure, 
armed with a revolver, and with a long dagger 
stuck through his belt, stood in the doorway ! An 
instant he remained perfectly still, his eyes glitter- 
ing through his black mask, his white teeth gleam- 
ing under his bristling mustache. Then he gave 
a short, rough laugh, and, pushing the boys aside 
with the butt of his revolver, he strode into the 
next state-room. 

John and William were after him in a flash. 
Rushing to their mother's side, they confronted 
the pirate with their heads flung up, their eyes 
flashing. If they could n't fight, they could at 
least show him they would n't run. 

The robber, for such he appeared to be, spoke 
in quick, short sentences, pointing his revolver at 
the necklace and rings which Mrs. Haskell was 
wearing and motioning to a silver bag which lay 
on the dressing-table. It was quite useless to 
resist and Mrs. Haskell calmly took off her jewels 
and handed them over. She went to the dressing- 
table and poured out the contents of the purse. 

She did something else which no one saw: she 
brushed a mass of papers and writing material 
into the waste-basket. Hidden amongst these 
papers was a little flat bag which she had taken 
from the silver purse! 

The next proceedings were carried on in abso- 
lute silence. The pirate searched both the boys 
and their mother. Then he examined everything 
in the two rooms, — the desks, the baggage, even 
the bedding, — everything but the waste-basket in 
which lay the little flat bag. When he had satis- 
fied himself that he had found everything of 
value, he gave a loud snort of laughter and strode 
out of the room. 

Scarcely had the sound of the pirate's foot- 
steps died away when there was an excited clatter 
of voices from outside. There came a rapping on 
the door and a familiar voice in English called 
out, "All right in here?" It was the American 
officer. 

Mrs. Haskell hurried to the door. "Yes, we 're 
all right. What 's been happening?" 

"What 's been happening? Why, we 've been 
held up by a band of pirates who were hidden in 
the ship when we left Batum. They held up the 
crew and stopped the boat. Now they 're put- 
ting off for shore in one of the life-boats. Come 
out on deck and see them off." 

Mrs. Haskell and the two boys hurried to the 
deck. In the midst of an inky darkness, the 
little Suirah bobbed about on the black water. 
On one side of the ship a band of black-masked 
men, all with revolvers leveled, were ordering the 
crew to lower one of the life-boats. Silently and 
quickly the men were obeying. Resistance would 



have been useless, as the bandits were armed and 
too numerous to be overcome. 

At last the little boat was dropped to the dark 
water below. A ladder was thrown over the side 
and four of the crew were ordered to take their 
places at the oars. Then, backing slowly away, 
with their pistols still pointed at the crew and 
passengers, the pirates reached the ladder and 
were down in a flash. As the last one left the 
ship, he triumphantly brandished his revolver 
and, ere he disappeared in the darkness, fired two 
shots just over the heads of the French sailors. 

As if in answer, there came the toot of a horn 
in the distance. A few hundred yards to the 
stern of the Suirah a light flashed suddenly. 
Once more the pirate's shots rang out, and again 
the horn replied. In the stillness, the Suirah's 
little company could hear the splash of the oars as 
the boat made its way toward the light, but in 
the darkness they could see nothing. 

For many minutes the Suirah's passengers 
waited, huddled -together, speaking only in whis- 
pers. At the end of nearly half an hour they 
heard the row-boat returning, and a few minutes 
later the four sailors called to them from below 
to let down the ladder. 

For the first time, some one spoke aloud. 

"They made us row over to a little gasolene 
launch half a mile away that had followed us out 
of the bay and waited there to meet them," one of 
the sailors said, as the four clambered over the 
rail of the ship. "The launch hid its light until 
they got the signal of two pistol-shots from here," 
he continued, "and then they signaled where they 
were — a great little getaway for them!" 

It was some time later before the excitement 
finally died down and the boys and their mother 
returned to their state-rooms. "Well, we cer- 
tainly had our adventure, all right!" said John. 

"Yes, we did," answered William; "but we 've 
lost all our money, too. Is n't it awful, Mother?" 

"Not quite all, boys," replied Mrs. Haskell ; and 
walking over to the waste-basket, she pulled out 
the little flat bag. "This I managed to save. 
Almost all of our money was in here, so the rob- 
bers did n't get so much after all !" 

Half an hour later, as the boys were getting into 
their narrow bunks, the spirit of adventure had 
cooled a bit. "Just the same," said John, "I 
think I '11 be pretty glad when we get back to 
America again. This '11 make a fine story to tell 
the fellows, but — gee! do you know, I was kind 
o' scared for a while there." 

"Huh!" grunted William, as he pulled the 
covers up over his head, "who cares about being 
a little scared if he can get attacked by pirates. 
That 's what / say!" 

Mary Lena Wilson. 



KEEPING FIT FOR GOLF 



By FRANCIS OUIMET 



When I began writing golf stories for St. Nicho- 
las I was a novice at playing the game as far as 
competition and experience were concerned. 
Most of my tournaments had been either inter- 
scholastic or local. Since those days many things 
have happened to me that the average youth does 
not think about in the beginning of his career 
on the links. Perhaps the greatest lesson from 
experience, in so far as golf is concerned, is to 
learn to save your strength and enthusiasm for the 
time when you really need them. Most of us burn 
ourselves out before it is time to meet competition 
of the hardest kind. 

As I see golf now, I would rather enter a cham- 
pionship with the knowledge that while I might 
have played more often in preparing for it, this 
handicap would be more than taken care of by the 
enthusiasm I would have for the matches. Lack- 
ing this keenness, one is almost sure to encounter 
disaster. The first time this came to my attention 
was in 1915. When the summer season came 
around that year and John Anderson's work at 
the Fessenden School was over, he rushed to his 
boys' camp in the woods of New Hampshire, miles 
Irom any links, where he had no opportunity 
whatever to play his favorite game. He had little 
or no time to think of it, either, being so busy tak- 
ing care of the many boys who spent the summer 
with him. 

That year the Amateur Championship was 
played at the Detroit Country Club. On my 
way to it I happened upon John bent upon the 
same mission — winning the title. He informed 
me casually he had played but one game of golf 
since school had closed in the early summer, two 
months before. My opinion was that he had ab- 
solutely no chance to do anything. We arrived on 
the links two days before the qualifying round. 
John went over the course several times, prac- 
tised some mashie shots in addition, and expressed 
himself as being not only ready for the affair, but 
satisfied with his game. 

This all struck me as rather amusing in view of 
the fact that all the other fellows who were pres- 
ent had been hard at work since early spring, prac- 
tising for this very tournament. There was one 
other contestant who had followed John's seeming 
lack of plan — Bob Gardner. Bob had given little 
time to golf that year. But imagine my surprise, 
when it came down to the finals, to find these two 
players the sole survivors. 

I have always attributed this rather startling 
ending of the 1915 Amateur to the fact that these 



two golfers had entered that affair with the great- 
est enthusiasm imaginable and that this very 
thing did more than any other factor to bring out 
the splendid games they played. Where the 
others had worn themselves out in the prepara- 
tion, Anderson and Gardner had stored up an 
abundance of strength and enthusiasm. They 
had ample reserve power to call upon in the 
pinches, and as the play advanced from day to 
day, their games improved by leaps and bounds. 

Keeping fit, physically and mentally, is the big 
job of all athletes. What would happen to a big 
college football eleven if its trainer did not watch 
particularly this important point? I am inclined 
to think, and those close to this sport have told 
me, that a team which is stale and overworked 
rarely lasts a full period. The same thing is true 
in track athletics. There is the case of Joie Ray, 
one of the greatest mile-runners we have ever 
produced. Ray went to Antwerp this past sum- 
mer to compete in the Olympic Games as a mem- 
ber of the team from the United States. From 
early winter and up to the time he sailed to Bel- 
gium, Ray had been in active competition. There 
was no one at his distance during all this long 
period who seemed to be in his class. It was felt 
by all who followed those games that, when his 
special event was run, Ray would prove an easy 
winner. But instead of coming in first in this race, 
Ray did not place! You cannot make me believe 
there are half a dozen better men in this event 
than Joie Ray. It was just another case of being 
burned out. Ray suffered the penalty which 
comes from too much preparation. 

Of course, when they consider golf, most boys 
will say it is not like the strenuous sports and that 
the average healthy youngster can play it all day 
without getting tired. I '11 admit that football or 
mile-running is a far more wearing game; but I 
must say that golf carries a greater mental strain 
than almost any sport we have. To be sure, there 
is such a thing as not playing enough to put one in 
just the right condition, and the case of John An- 
derson, which I cited, almost illustrates this. Cir- 
cumstances simply made it impossible for him to 
give the time to golf that he felt he should have 
given in his preparation for the Amateur Cham- 
pionship at Detroit in 191 5. But the fact remains 
that his long lay-off from the game, coupled with 
his fine physical condition, just about fitted him 
perfectly for the supreme test of the season. 

1 n t he beginning of my competitive days I used 
to work hard and conscientiously for a big event. 



KEEPING FIT FOR GOLF 



613 



The last few seasons I have not. I have felt satis- 
fied to arrive on the scene a day or two before the 
match started. Then I would go around the 
course a few times without taxing my strength to 
any great extent, more for the purpose of getting 
its general plan in my 
mind than for anything 
else. Such a scheme 
saved me mentally and 
physically for the play, 
just as it taught me all 
that was necessary to 
know about the course. 

One of the most apt 
illustrations of over-golf- 
ing concerns the invasion 
of England by a group of 
United States amateurs 
in 1914. This summer a 
greater invasion is in or- 
der. It is to be hoped we 
may profit by our earlier 
experience. In that year 
the late Fred HerreshofT, 
Jerry Travers, Arthur 
Lockwood, and the pres- 
ent writer went over in 
quest of the British Ama- 
teur title several weeks 
in advance of "Chick" 
Evans, Harold Weber, 
Fraser Hale, and some 
other players. We, of the 
advance guard, thought 
we were doing the right 
thing. Now it happens 
that the English champi- 
onship links are isolated. 
Once you get to them, 
there is nothing to do but 
to play golf. We soon 
tired of having so much 
of it, but we continued to 
play for want of other re- 
creation. Just before the 
big event started, Jerry 
Travers came to me and 
said, "Francis, I 'm tired 
out. I wish this tournament was over with." 
He expressed my feelings exactly. You can 
judge for yourself whether or not we were fit to 
play when the big event came. I never can be 
convinced that this was not the cause of our 
early eliminations. 

The less the experience of a golfer, the more apt 
he is to over-golf. At the Engineers' Club this 
past summer I saw any number of high-class young 
players practising for hours at a time, even after 



they had played thirty-six holes. Do you not see 
how little of value there was in such practice after 
muscles were weary from a full day of play? One 
youngster in particular was advised to smooth his 
drive. Every day he must have driven enough 




KEEPING FIT, PHYSICALLY AND MENTALLY, IS THE JOB OF ALL ATHLETES" 



balls, following his two rounds, to equal the 
effort he had previously spent in going around the 
links. He had developed a slice. But how he ever 
hoped to remedy it, with wrists and muscles al- 
ready fatigued,, is beyond me! Indeed, one has 
but to spend a few days at a course before a 
championship event starts in order to separate the 
old hands from the novices. The veterans will go 
there for two purposes — hitting enough shots to 
get the stiffness out of their arms, and familiariz- 



614 



KEEPING FIT FOR GOLF 



ing themselves with the course; while the novices 
use every minute of daylight to play and practise. 
Sometimes this latter class wins; but more often, 
and far too frequently, they weary themselves 
beyond the point of recovery. 

Golf is no longer an old man's game. The 
youth of this and other nations are taking it up in 
ever increasing numbers because they have found 
that no other sport possesses quite the same pecu- 
liar nerve-stirring or soul-trying qualities as does 
t his one. There are two kinds of golf, to be sure — 
that played with friends for the mere pleasure of 
being outdoors with them and measuring strokes, 
and that played for championships and to win, al- 
I hough the same high ethics and good feeling pre- 
vail in both. 

To illustrate the soul-trying feature of this sport 
one has but to review in part the match between 
young Reggie Lewis and Chick Evans at the 
Amateur Championship this past summer. After 
battling for the best part of a day, Lewis stepped 
up to the last tee with a lead of one hole on Evans 
and drove as fine a ball down the middle of the 
fairway as any one would want. This fairway, 
for the time being, had been transformed into a 
vast amphitheater, packed with an enormous 
crowd, for the word had gone forth that the young- 
ster was downing Evans, news that seemed mi- 
raculous to the followers of amateur play. Then 
came Chick's turn. He had witnessed this magnif- 
icent shot by Lewis and must have realized the 
odds were greatly against him, for he had to win 
that hole to prevent defeat. Can you imagine his 
distress when his tee-shot forced the crowd to 
part, a sure indication that he had pulled it off 
the fairway and would find an unfavorable lie? 

No golfer ever faced a harder task than did 
Evans when he came upon his ball. In the first 
place, a sand-trap had caught it; and in the 
second, there was a barrier between him and the 
green in the form of a clump of trees. Evans did 
the only thing possible under the conditions — 
tried for the green. His attempt was anything but 
a success, as his ball, striking the limb of a tree, 
bounded back upon the fairway but a few yards in 
advance of the tee-shot of Lewis. This boy showed 
judgment on his second by playing it for the 
back of the green, safe from all apparent harm. 
As a result, Lewis lay just over the green on an 
embankment and Evans some one hundred-odd 
yards away, both to play three. 

A. fine mashie by Evans came to twenty feet be- 
yond the pin. It was a grand shot; but for all 
that, his case looked hopeless. Miracles were 
needed to win that hole and this shot had not been 
one. It seemed like a sure five for both, which 
was all that Lewis needed to win. Lewis took his 
time playing his third, a chip-shot that ran up 



[May 



nicely to within eight feet of the cup. Victory 
seemed a certainty for him. To rob him of it, 
Evans had to sink a nasty downhill putt of twenty 
feet and depend upon Lewis missing one of eight! 
Nobody envied Chick his position. 

Now, years of experience had taught Chick that 
a golfer should always have something in reserve 
to call upon in the crisis, and upon that reserve he 
was now to depend. Before it was his turn to play 
he had been walking back and forth across the 
green, much as does the thoroughbred at the 
barrier, waiting for the start. It seemed to me 
that during those awesome moments Chick was 
weighing his chances and was coming to a con- 
clusion. The outstanding feature of the real 
athlete's make-up is the uncanny way he has of 
meeting the emergency. Then he came to his 
ball, studied the line, and with a firm putt sent it 
on its course along that treacherous downhill 
green. The next thing we knew, it dropped out of 
sight into the cup. Under the conditions, Lewis 
w ould have proved himself a miracle-man extraor- 
dinary had he sunk his own putt for a half. As 
it was, he made a valiant attempt. It took Chick 
five extra holes to gain his victory — the longest 
match ever played in our Amateur. 

As I analyze that match, it was only another 
case of an accomplished golfer winning over one 
less experienced. This may seem like a crude 
statement, in view of the record of Lewis, but I 
think all will agree he is less experienced by far 
than Evans. As it was his battle, that day stamps 
him as one of the greatest fighters and golfers in 
the country. But the main point I want to drive 
home about this same match is that had Chick 
been weary from too much golf, the reserve force 
which pulled him out of as critical a hole as any 
champion ever faced would have been lacking. 

All boys have heard of Fred Wright, the fine 
young golfer who won the Massachusetts title last 
year and tied Bobby Jones in the qualifying round 
of the National Amateur. Just the other day I 
was talking with him about this point of playing 
too much. He informed me that while he played 
a great deal last year, there was a period of about 
three weeks when he did not touch a club. It was 
before the Massachusetts championship, which, 
as usual, attracted a fine field. It was his ambi- 
tion to win this event. 

He qualified easily enough and on each succeed- 
ing day improved in play until he came to finals, 
where he faced Jesse Guilford, the "Siege-gun" of 
the links. Guilford had been playing right along 
up to this tournament. As a result, he was tired 
and made a slow start. Wright, keyed up and 
keen on account of his rest, started off like a 
frisky colt, settled right down to play, and in a 
jiffy had a nice lead. Guilford found himself 



KEEPING FIT FOR GOLF 



615 



struggling for halved holes instead of wins and 
unable to force his game to its top pace. Wright 
won, and attributes his success to his lay-off. 

I trust from all I have said that my readers will 
not carry the impression with them that I recom- 
mend little or no golf as a best means of preparing 
for big things. On the contrary, I strongly advise 
a great deal of it, but not just before a big event. 
One should learn as early as possible in his golf 
career just how much work and practice he needs 
to be in prime condition and at the top of his game. 
Then care must be used. I should advise boys and 
girls to practise their weaknesses in the spring. 

No other problem of the game quite equals the 
one of knowing just what doses of golf to take to 
keep in fine form. This past summer I did a lot of 
work preparing for the meeting Jesse Guilford and 
I had with Ray and Vardon. Five days before 
that meeting I did the course in 69, two strokes 



under par. I decided not to play again until the 
day before. That was where I made my mistake. 
On that day I repeated this fine score, but was 
never so blue in my life. My friends were elated 
and counted on my playing a great game. I was 
afraid, and justly, that I had started downhill. 
The next day my surmise proved correct. I had 
played just once too often. Had I been a bit more 
careful, or a better judge of myself, this slump 
might not have happened. I do not put this down 
because I am trying to excuse my defeat. Nothing 
is farther from my thoughts. I 'm merely trying 
to illustrate the point of this story. The tired 
golfer is not the best. When he feels that way in 
his muscles or has n't a keen desire to play, the 
very best thing he can do is to forget all about 
golf until the desire comes back. That, you will 
find, is the real secret of success, once you have 
mastered your strokes. 




"the tired golfer is not the best" 



SnAVfi vc Ki ri'S (U) Final Round 



^^ArBetllad of c3olf er Romance 

/3y Charles 5~£gsrer*~ 





he softly shimmering summer sun shone smiling in the sky 

(Where I 've noticed he quite often does his smiling, by the by). 
He smiled upon the Lady Kate, but vainly, it appears, 
For though the sun was smiling, the daughter was in tears. 

While Lord Bazoom, her father, was playing "Snap the whip" 
With some of his retainers, she had given him the slip 
And stolen forth into the wood — but sadly to her cost! 
For now 't was evident the lass, alas! at last was lost. 



Now could I extricate Miss Kate from out the wood, I would; 

But you see I find I 've lost her, so to try will do no good. 

Let 's change the scene. Zip — Presto — Pop! And vow what do we spy? 

As I live, 't is good Sir Whackitt, with a golf-ball on his eye! 

(His eye upon the ball, I mean.) And here 's Sir Gigaboo, 
Sir Wibble, stout Sir Boofus, and scores of others, too, 
All come to watch the final round between the Count de Blupp 
And the noble young Sir Whackitt for the Royal Golfing Cup. 

Sir W'ibble, in his round against Sir Wobble (yes, his twin), 
Defaulted when his mashie shot bounced off Sir Wobble's shin. 
Sir Boofus was a sailor bold; said he, "This game is grand; 
But though at home at sea, I see I am at sea on land!" 





IVhacliH- 




Sir tyibble defaulting 



SirJBoo/us 



610 



SIR WHACK ITT'S FINAL ROUND 



617 




Old Count Kafoozle ate a slice of toast at every tee. 
(He said they went together.) Young Sir Gervaise Magee 
Had trained his dog to caddy, but found it would n't Ho, 
For just as Fido found the ball, he found a rabbit, too! 

I 've said it was the final round that they were playing there; 
But, hist! — and likewise, shish! — the round was not upon the square! 
For the count had coaxed the wizard Ziz, with sixtv lemon pies 
To wiz the good Sir Whackitt's ball, so he could win the prize. 





Of course Sir \\ hackitt soon found out he could not play at all. 
"I wot not what doth ail me!" quoth he. Just then his ball 
Sailed off and landed in a wood some half a mile away! 
"Gadzooks! I '11 find the thing," he cried, "e'en though it take all day!" 



Well, I must stop. But (you 're so keen!) the sequel need I tell- 
How good Sir Whackitt found the ball— and Lady Kate as well? 
And as to their betrothal — well, you safely may surmise 
That though Sir Whackitt lost the cup, he surely won a prize ! 




THE LUCK OF DENEWOOD 



By EMILIE BENSON KNIPE and ALDEN ARTHUR KNIPE 

Authors of "The Lucky Sixpence," "Beatrice of Denewood," "Vive la France!" etc. 

SYNOPSIS OF THE PREVIOUS INSTALMENTS 

Peg Travers, joint heir with her brother Jack to the estate of Denewood, in Germantown. which they are too Door 
to keep up and have rented as a school for girls, receives a letter from her brother, an officer with the A E F 
saying that a relative of the family, a French girl named Beatrice de Soulange, has come to him asking for assistance' 
and he has thought it best to send her to America. Her brother, Louis de Soulange, an officer in the French armv' 
m an aeroplane flight over the lines, has disappeared and is "missing." Peg. who lives with her aunt in the lodge at 
Denewood, is talking this news over with her cousin, Betty Powell, when the French girl unexpectedly arrives— a 
girl of their own age, deeply interested in the Denewood books and the history of their house. Her first desire is to 
see the lucky sixpence, their family talisman, and when she is told that it has been lost for a century she is astounded 
at the girls' indifference and declares her belief that with it was lost the luck of Denewood. Full of gratitude for 
their whole-hearted hospitality, she determines to find the sixpence and restore the luck of the house Beatrice 
plans to hunt for it, and, to that end, is anxious to become a pupil at Maple Hall, as the school at Denewood is 
called. On her admission to the school Beatrice begins her search for the sixpence. Miss Maple discovering this 
and thinking it a waste of time forbids day-scholars to go above the first floor of Maple Hall Pe<* is vastly 
excited by a letter from Jack asking for a description of the Soulange ring and warning her to stand guard over B6 
Iest unauthorized news ot her brother rouse false hopes. Shortly after, a young man, who announces himself as 
Captain Badger of the British Army, calls, saying that he has news of Louis which he will give to no one but Be 
With Jack's letter in her mind, Peg refuses to let him see Be. Her cousin, Mr. Powell, approves of what she has 
done. Be, ignorant of this crisis in her affairs, unsuccessfully searches the spring-house for the entrance to the 
secret passage she believes is still there. Betty, from the living-room, sees the Englishman return to the lodge 
Beatrice goes again to the spring-house and finds the passage. Hearing some one coming, she conceals herself 
in it. Betty is mistaken for Be by Captain Badger and Peg persuades her to impersonate her cousin in order to 
obtain news of Louis, and, seated outside the spring-house, hear what he has to say, while Peg, concealed inside 
could also find out what the stranger proposed. 



CHAPTER XIV 

NEWS OF LOUIS DE SOULANGE 

Peg had arrived at the spring-house a little 
breathless from running. She came in from the 
back and slipped quickly inside, hoping that she 
had not been observed from the teacher's pavilion. 
Closing the door behind her, she strove to be as 
quiet as possible, but the hinges would creak in 
spite of her precautions. As she pushed, her 
hand came in contact with an old-fashioned bolt, 
which put an idea into her busy brain. 

"Humph! That 's good," she thought. "If 
he is very suspicious, he might try the door." It 
took an effort to slip the rusty fastening, but she 
succeeded just as the murmur of voices outside 
reached her. Trembling with excitement, she 
crouched down, wondering what would be the 
outcome of this adventure. 

Peg's heart gave a great thump of apprehension 
as Captain Badger pressed his weight against the 
door, but she smiled confidently and congratu- 
lated herself upon her forethought when she 
found it held solidly. Then she concentrated all 
her attention upon the conversation taking place 
outside, from which she was separated by only 
an inch or two of oak planking. She found that 
she could hear perfectly, and had not long to wait 
before Betty's exclamation of surprised con- 
sternation set her thoughts whirling. 

"The Soulange ring!" 



In a moment all her theories were upset. ' Jack 
could not have seen the ring if this British captain 
had it in his possession. All the conjectures she 
had evolved to explain her brother's desire for a 
description of the ancient heirloom apparently 
were wrong. 

On the other hand, here was evidence that the 
English officer must know something of Louis de 
Soulange. She held her breath, waiting anxiously 
for the next words of those without. 

"This ring will prove to you, Mademoiselle, 
that I am in your brother's confidence. It was 
necessary to establish that fact before we could 
proceed. You understand, do you not?" 

Betty, somewhat dismayed, nodded her head. 
To be suddenly confronted with that ring, which 
had always seemed mysterious and unreal to her, 
was very disconcerting, but surely Louis would 
not have entrusted a relic so cherished to any but 
a friend. Also, she understood that the man 
beside her had an important communication to 
make about the lost young Frenchman. What 
would it be? She could not guess; and in a vague 
way, she was a little frightened. The man's 
frank assumption that she was Beatrice left her 
no defense should he discover his mistake. For a 
moment she was too troubled to utter a sound. 

She was relieved, however, to find Captain 
Badger placing a wholly unwarranted construc- 
tion upon her constraint. 

"Your emotion is natural," he said, in a sym- 



THE LUCK OF DEN FAY 00 D 



619 



pathetic voice. "The silence that has surrounded 
your brother's disappearance must have been 
most painful. Nothing is so hard to bear as 
uncertainty, and it is his wish, first of all, that 
you should be relieved of any further doubt. 
You will be rejoiced to learn, Mademoiselle, that 
he is alive." 

He ceased speaking and watched the girl beside 
him narrowly, and Betty, conscious that what had 
just been said would be of tremendous importance 
to Be, whom she was impersonating, summoned 
all her faculties to play her part convincingly. 

"Oh, 1 'ave always known it; yet I am so joy- 
ful," she murmured, looking straight before her. 
"I felt that he mus' be alive, and now — and 
now — " She stopped, faltering, and, with a quick 
turn toward the captain, held out her hand to 
him. "How can I thank you?" she said, with a 
little choke in her voice that was very well done 
indeed. 

"I am glad to have brought so welcome a mes- 
sage, Mademoiselle," the officer returned impres- 
sively; but he could not hide a faint smile of sat- 
isfaction that, for an instant, showed his white, 
pointed teeth. 

He took the girl's proffered hand, but, dropping 
it at once, resumed his more businesslike tone. 

"Now that your mind is at rest, Mademoiselle," 
he went on, "I may say that Louis was most 
reluctant to give me this. But it was necessary 
in order that you should not question his having 
sent me." As he ended, he put the ring back in 
his pocket. 

"But why is he not here himself?" asked Betty. 
"What need was there of a messenger?" 

"You will understand the need when I tell you 
my story, which I will do as briefly as I can," 
Captain Badger began briskly. "You recall 
that on the night he disappeared Captain de 
Soulange had accomplished his purpose. That 
much was well known to the officers of the French 
Army. But what happened to him after that, 
only I and a few others in the world can reveal." 

"He was taken prisoner?" Betty asked eagerly. 
She no longer needed to assume an interest to 
fit the role she was playing. Be herself could 
have been but little more thrilled by the prospect 
of a full revelation of what had befallen Louis. 
Betty was conscious that her romantic imaginings 
were being carried far beyond any point she could 
have invented. To be sure, she realized that at 
any moment Captain Badger might discover the 
deception that was being played upon him, and 
each time she was forced to move in the pre- 
carious game she was playing she felt as if she 
were walking along the edge of a precipice. Peg 
had prophesied thrills, and Peg had been right. 

"Captain de Soulange was taken prisoner," 



Captain Badger's voice went on smoothly. "As 
he was returning, elated at having accomplished 
what he had set out to do, suddenly a cloth was 
thrown over his head and he was seized from 
behind. In a moment his arms were secured and 
he was captured, unharmed, without a blow being 
struck." 

"I am rejoice' that he was not hurt," Betty 
murmured gratefully. 

"It was not intended that he should be hurt, 
Mademoiselle," the n an continued. "Those who 
seized your brother were not enemies of war, al- 
though Louis naturally believed at first that he 
had fallen into the hands of the Germans; which 
supposition disturbed him very little." 

"He must have known that his sister would be 
heart-broken!" Betty exclaimed. And her own 
heart stopped for an instant as she realized that 
she had forgotten the part she was playing. But 
Captain Badger, intent upon making a good im- 
pression in his recital, did not notice the slight 
slip, and the girl drew a deeper breath as he con- 
tinued. 

"Undoubtedly he did feel for his sister," the 
officer said, "but he was fully aware that the great 
conflict was near its end and thought that word 
would be sent of his safety, in accordance with 
the usual etiquette observed toward the enemy by 
members of the aviation service, even among the 
Germans." 

"But nothing was heard from him?" Betty 
interrupted, with a gesture aimed to counteract 
the effect of her previous mistake. 

"Your brother was not a prisoner of war," the 
captain explained, a trifle impatiently. "He 
was not in the hands of the Germans, but of 
robbers." 

"Robbers!" echoed Betty, astounded at this 
news. 

"Yes. A company of outcasts, recruited from 
all the armies, had seized him," Captain Badger 
returned. "They have a safe retreat and are 
ably led. While the war was on, they had plied 
their trade with little fear of being disturbed. 
Since then, they have been more circumspect, but 
so carefully are they hidden that it will be a long 
time yet before the band is broken up. Their 
plan is to seize a man who is rich and force him to 
buy his freedom. This, Louis de Soulange, in the 
beginning, refused to do." 

"But how do you know all this?" Betty asked. 
She was losing her romantic interest in this nar- 
rative and beginning to appreciate the more sin- 
ister aspect of the tale she was hearing. More- 
over, a half-formed doubt of this voluble young 
man began to take shape in her mind. 

But Captain Badger was not disconcerted in 
the slightest by this direct question; indeed, his 



620 



THE LUCK OF DENEWOOD 



answer came so readily that it must have been 
anticipated. 

"Because I, too, Mademoiselle, was a captive," 
he said plausibly. "They found me a lean fowl 
and hardly worth plucking," he went on with a 
laugh. "If it had been otherwise— if I could have 
iurnished the means myself, you may be sure I 
should not have crossed the ocean to seek help 
lor my friend, Louis de Soulange." 

He spoke with a fine air of sincerity, and for 
the moment Betty questioned her growing doubts 
of him; but his next words brought these crowd- 
ing back into her thoughts. 

''But, seeing that I am poor," he went on, after 
an instant's pause, "I am forced to come to you, 
Louis's sister, for the money necessary to obtain 
his release." 

It was now plain what the man wanted, and 
the spirit of frugality and thrift that Betty had 
inherited from her Powell ancestors was up in 
arms at once. Instinctively she mistrusted his 
motives, and the secrecy with which he had gone 
about the business confirmed her suspicions. 
Moreover, all the family knew that Beatrice had 
arrived in America very short of funds; and al- 
though she seemed to suggest that her brother had 
plenty, it was a subject upon which the French 
girl rarely spoke. 

Rapidly these thoughts passed through Betty's 
mind and led her suddenly to a surprising con- 
clusion. She fancied that Captain Badger was 
aware of her identity and was endeavoring to 
work upon her sympathies in order to obtain 
some of the Powell money for his own ends. For 
the moment she was ready to disbelieve every- 
thing he said, even his statement that Louis was 
alive. On the other hand, she felt that perhaps 
there was information to be gained, and she made 
an effort to conceal her distrust. 

"But I 'ave no money," she said at last, discon- 
solately. 

"You have no money!" the man exclaimed, and 
the girl recognized for the first time a ring of 
sincerity in his utterance. 

"I 'ave no money at all," she repeated, shaking 
her head sorrowfully. 

"Then you did n't bring the strong box with 
you?" Captain Badger questioned, looking keenly 
at the girl beside him. 

"No, I did not," Betty replied positively. To 
be sure she had n't the slightest idea now what 
the man was talking about; but she had seen 
everything Be had brought with her on the day 
of her arrival at the lodge, and there was noth- 
ing resembling a strong box among her scanty 
belongings. 

"Then where did you hide it, Mademoiselle?" 
the captain demanded, his voice shaking a little, 



[May 



whether from anger or disappointment, Betty 
could not tell. 

Here was a question that was wholly out of her 
power to answer. Be had never mentioned any 
strong box, and though such a thing might easily 
exist, its whereabouts was as unknown to Betty 
as to the officer who sought it. 

But Betty was not yet ready to betray igno- 
rance of a matter Beatrice would, presumably, 
have knowledge of. She was very near the edge 
of the precipice, and a false step would certainly 
send her tumbling. She wanted to avoid a direct 
answer to his last question; and while she paused, 
the captain, attributing her hesitation to other 
causes, spoke again. 

"I see you do not trust me," he said, with a 
shade of reproach in his voice, "nor can I alto- 
gether blame you. I told Louis it was asking too 
much. But he said to me,— and I quote his very 
words, Mademoiselle,— 'Take the ring, my dear 
George, and that will show her that I have entire 
faith in you. My sister loves me, and she will 
count money but a little thing when weighed 
against my life.' On that assurance I have come 
to you." 

Captain Badger strove to convey a feeling of 
deep sincerity in his words; but Betty, wholly 
unable to satisfy his demands, also continued to 
hold her doubt of him. 

"Again let me see the ring," she said, and held 
out her hand for it. 

Captain Badger would not give it into her 
hands, but held it in his own fingers for her 
inspection. 

"But I wish it," the girl insisted. "It is a ring 
of my family. You 'ave no right to keep it." 

"I am sorry, but there I must differ with you," 
Captain Badger answered. "It was given to me 
in trust. Either it must fulfil its mission or I 
must return it to the man who placed it in my 
hands." With a gesture of finality he returned it 
to his pocket. 

"Oh, I see!" Betty said, rising. "For the ring 
1 must tell you where the strong box is 'idden> 
Is that it?" 

"Exactly, Mademoiselle!" The man's teeth 
flashed as he stood up beside her. 

"So it is I who must do all the trusting!" Betty 
raised her voice, giving rein to her growing feeling 
of resentment. "I am to give you I know not 
how much, to pay a ransom the amount of which 
you do not tell me. Non! Non! Non! That is 
my only answer, Monsieur!" 

Captain Badger, fully expecting that his re- 
quest would be complied with sooner or later, fell 
back a pace, wholly disconcerted. It was as if a 
gentle butterfly had suddenly pounced upon his 
hand and bitten it. For an instant he could find 



1921] 



THE LUCK OF DENEVYOOL) 



621 



no word to say, and Betty made a motion to leave 
him which brought her beside the door of the 
spring-house. 

"Mademoiselle!" he cried, hurriedly going to 
her side, "I beg you will not act so hastily. The 
ransom demanded is three hundred thousand 
francs. It was my inten- 
tion, of course, to carry 
the box to Louis so 
that he might pay these 
brigands and keep what 
remained." 

"Well," remarked 
Betty, shrewdly, entirely 
off her guard, "I 'm only 
a girl; but even I can 
see what a silly idea that 
is." 

For an instant Badger 
cast a suspicious glance 
at her. 

"Mademoiselle speaks 
English like an Ameri- 
can," he said signifi- 
cantly. 

Betty, though her 
heart beat like a trip- 
hammer, threw up her 
head gamely. 

"Always, since I am a 
child, I speak English," 
she retorted. "And now 
that I am in America, I 
improve. But what mat- 
ters that? You must find 
a better plan, Captain 
Badger, than to sen' into 
the clutches of these rob- 
bers more than they ask." 

"There is much in 
what you say," Badger 
answered soothingly; 
"but how can we possibly 
arrange it? You, Made- 
moiselle, are here; the 
box — is in France. The 
bandits have a limited 
patience, and, although 

I regret to say it, confinement is bad, even for 
the best of constitutions." 

"Is — is Louis ill?" asked Betty? Even while 
she pretended to be his sister, Betty was conscious 
that, in speaking his name, she was being very 
familiar with a marquis. 

"I can hardly say that he is ill," Captain Badger 
replied ; "at least, he was not when I left. Indeed, 
my chief fear is that he will grow tired of waiting 
and make some reckless attempt to escape. In 



which case 1 would not give that for his life." 
The officer snapped his fingers impressively. 

"But he will wait till you return," Betty in- 
sisted. 

"It is to be hoped so," Badger rejoined, with 
slight conviction in his tone, "if I am not too long 




SIT, O TRAGEDY QUEEN! MY POOR HEAD 'S BUZZING' " (SEE NEXT PAGE) 

delayed. But if I should go back empty- 
handed — " He paused, with a significant shrug 
of his shoulders. 

"Nothing should be done hastily," Betty re- 
plied with firmness. "I mus' 'ave advice in this 
matter. I am only a school-girl, and — " 

"My dear Mademoiselle," Badger cut in 
sharply, "if you talk of seeking advice, then I 
must bid you good-day. I know the uselessness 
of talk in a matter of this kind. Sooner or later 



bU THE LUCK OF 

it gets into the hands of the police; and when it 
does, I warn you that instead of saving your 
brother, you will be sending him to his death. 
No, Mademoiselle, I cannot help you if it is your 
purpose to take others into your confidence. Let 
us come to an understanding. Tell me what I 
ask, or let us end the affair here and now." 

He spoke so resolutely that Betty was shaken in 
her conviction that he sought money for himself 
and cared not at all for Louis de Soulange. Yet 
in some way she must temporize. At the moment 
she could only repeat the "Non! Non! Non!" she 
had uttered so steadfastly, because she had no 
knowledge of the box he asked for. But she did 
not dare dismiss the man entirely. She wished 
she could talk to Peg for a moment and consult 
her as to what was to be done; but of course that 
was impossible. 

"I tell you," she said, coming to a sudden reso- 
lution, "it is one thing to spen' money to save a 
brother; but it is quite another to throw it away 
and get nothing in return. I *ave never before 
seen you. It is right that you give me time to 
consider what it is best I do. If you insist, then 
we are at an end ; but I would like to think well of 
this." 

"I 've no objection to your thinking," the cap- 
tain replied rather roughly. "It 's talking I 
won't have. Give me your word that you will 
tell no one of what has passed between us." 

"I regret that I may not speak of it and so fin' 
advice; but if you 'ave objection, then I mus' 
keep silent. [ give my word, Monsieur." Betty 
could hardly resist the impulse to turn and grin 
at the spring-house door. 

"Very well," Captain Badger agreed, with no 
very good grace, "to-morrow, at this time, I will 
be here to meet you, and, till after that meeting, 
you must promise not to reveal the information I 
have given you." 

"I 'ave already given you my word, Monsieur," 
Betty replied. 

"Word of honor?" he insisted. 

"Parole d'honneur!" Betty answered, and 
started away. 

As they neared the lodge, Captain Badger, as 
if .he regretted his insistence, spoke half apologet- 
ically. 

"I know that a Soulange will keep her word," 
he said, "but I feel so strongly about this that' I 
must again impress upon you the great need for 
secrecy. Remember, it is all for Louis's sake. 
Good-by till to-morrow, Mademoiselle." 

He held out a friendly hand, but Betty dropped 
him a stiff little courtesy. 

"An revoir, Monsieur," she murmured with her 
best French intonation, and ran off, to disappear 
through the front door. 



DENEWOOD 

[May 

CHAPTER XV 

PEG AND BETTY TALK IT OVER 

Betty had scarcely entered the lodge when Peg 
having skirted the drive and kept the shrubberv 
between herself and Captain Badger, rushed pant- 
ing into the house. Her cheeks were scarlet and 
her eyes dancing. 

"You 're the dandy little actress!" she cried, 
bubbling over with excitement. "I did n't 
know you could do it. Come in here and let 's 
talk." She dragged Betty into the living-room 
closed all the doors, and flopped down on the 
sofa. 

"Sit, O tragedy queen, and let 's see where 
we 're at. My poor head 's buzzing !" 

"I gave the word of a Soulange that I would n't 
tell anything," Betty said demurely, taking her 
place beside her cousin. She was still under the 
spell of her recent experiences and had not quite 
shaken off the feeling that she was playing a part . 

"That 's all right," Peg answered compla- 
cently. "You don't have to tell anything. I 
heard every word of it. You promised not to 
reveal what he told you. I noticed that particu- 
larly; but that does n't prevent you from dis- 
cussing it with me." 

"Are you sure of that, Peg?" Betty demanded 
hopefully. She was anxious to talk, if she could 
do so without breaking her promise. "Of course," 
she went on, becoming more and more the normal 
Betty, "he never suspected that you were in the 
spring-house and thought if I did n't tell anybody 
what he said to me, I could n't discuss it." 

"Exactly!" agreed Peg. "But as long as I 
know the facts already, you 're not betraying any 
confidences. Now let 's get down to business." 
Peg wriggled into the corner of the sofa and 
wrinkled her forehead, preparatory to deep think- 
ing. 

"It is quite plain that the man wants money!" 
Betty declared. 

"There 's no doubt about that. He said so," 
Peg agreed. "But the question is, how are we 
going to get it for him?" 

"Why, I should n't think of giving him any- 
thing," Betty protested vehemently. "We have- 
no proof but his word — " 

"There 's the ring," Peg interrupted. "He 
must have got that from Louis de Soulange." 

"How do you know he did?" Betty argued. 
"He may have found it. It might have been 
lost." 

"That 's possible, but very unlikely," Peg 
answered. "Besides, suppose he had found it, 
how would he have known it was the Soulange 
ring?" 

"He said he was a friend," Betty put in; but 



1921] 



THE LUCK OF DENEWOOD 



623 



seeing that this suggestion was contrary to her 
previous statement, she added, "I don't believe 
it, though." 

"I 'm not sure," Peg mused. "There were 
times when I thought he was telling the truth, 
and times when I did n't believe a word he said. 
There 's certainly a strong box somewhere; but 
of course you can't tell him where it is, because 
you don't know." 

"I should n't if I did know," Betty insisted. 

"I would," Peg said evenly. 

"But that would be perfectly foolish!" Betty 
exclaimed heatedly. "We have nothing to prove 
he would n't just take the money and keep it and 
never go near Louis." 

"We 'd have to take that risk," Peg replied. 
"We could try, of course, to get some guarantee 
out of this Captain Badger, though I don't be- 
lieve he 'd give us any. But there 's no use talk- 
ing about that till we find out where the box is." 

"Do you suppose Be knows anything about 
it?" Betty asked. 

"I should n't wonder," Peg replied. "It 
seems quite probable to me that, during the war, 
Louis would want to have a lot of ready money 
hidden away somewhere for Be's sake, in case 
everything went to smash. Of course, it was put 
away carefully so that the Germans could n't 
find it." 

"That 's so," Betty admitted. "And the only 
way Captain Badger could know of its existence 
would be from Louis. Maybe he 's telling the 
truth after all." 

"The thing that does n't seem right to me," 
Peg remarked slowly, "is this tale about a band 
of outcasts. He talked as if they were capturing 
officers by the dozen and making them pay ran- 
soms. If that were true, the whole band would 
have so much money they would n't know what to 
do with it. Why should they bother to send all 
the way to America? If I were a bandit, I 'd 
do things quicker than that." 

"I never thought of being a bandit," Betty 
remarked. "It must be rather exciting." 

"And there 's another thing," Peg continued, 
without heeding her cousin's words, "if there 
were as many people getting themselves ransomed 
as this captain says there are, you 'd think some 
of them would get together and go after the 
brigands, would n't you? They 'd know where 
they were hiding and — " 

"Why of course they would!" Betty inter- 
rupted, as this idea impressed itself upon her. 
"I said all the time he was n't telling the truth." 

"But then you see," Peg went on, trying to 
think the matter out logically, "it is n't improb- 
able that Louis de Soulange is really being held for 
a ransom and there may not be any band at all." 



"That does n't make sense," Betty put in, 
quite bewildered for the moment. "There 's 
either a band of robbers or there is n't. That 's 
positive!" 

"Oh, no, it is n't," Peg retorted promptly. "It 
does n't take a band to hold one man. Two or 
three could do it easily, and keep watch day and 
night." 

"That 's so," Betty admitted reluctantly. "I 
believe you 're right. I thought all the time there 
was something in what Captain Badger was 
saying. 

"And if there are only two or three men mixed 
up in it," Peg went on, as if talking to herself, 
"then they did n't capture this British officer, as 
he says they did ; in which case, how does he come 
to know all about it? That 's what 's bothering 
me." 

She paused a moment, and Betty looked at her 
with growing admiration. She could n't see 
where Peg's line of reasoning was carrying her, 
but they seemed to be arriving somewhere. 

"Louis might have sent him word and asked for 
help," Betty suggested. 

"Then Captain Badger would have said so," 
Peg returned, "instead of which he tells you he 
was a victim of these brigands. There 's only 
one way I can figure it out." 

"What 's that?" asked Betty, eagerly. 

"Captain Badger himself is the one who has 
kidnapped Louis de Soulange," announced Peg 
with conviction. 

"You mean — you mean that he 's a brigand," 
stuttered Betty, "and that I 've been talking to 
him?" 

"Sure!" replied Peg. "The more I think of it, 
the more certain I am." 

"Oh dear, oh dear!" Betty began half tearfully, 
emitting a sobbing laugh at the same time. "I 've 
been sitting with a robber and a bandit, and I 
never guessed it. I should have died of fright if 
I 'd known it — and to-morrow I 've promised to 
talk to him again and — and — But I can't do it, 
Peg! Can't you see I can't do it? It would be 
awful and — " 

"Hold on!" cried Peg, starting to rise. "If 
you 're going to have hysterics, I '11 have to pour 
water on your giddy head. Stop giggling !" 

Peg's threat had the desired effect, and Betty 
pulled herself together. 

"All the same, I sha'n't meet him to-morrow — 
I just could n't!" 

"We '11 cross that bridge when we come to it," 
Peg replied comfortably. "Meanwhile, we '11 have 
to find out from Be where that strong box is, 
without letting her know what for. And that 
is n't going to be very easy." 

"I think you ought to talk it over with Father 



624 



THE LUCK OF DENEWOOD 



before you do anything else," Betty suggested 
practically. "We would have no right to hand 
over any Soulange valuables." 

Peg nodded her head in agreement. 
_ "Of course," she said, "but I have n't had any 
time. I did telephone him this morning before 
you were up, and I told Captain Badger to go to 
see him; but you see he did n't go, and I 'm trying 
to get it straightened out in my head before I 
begin to talk it over with Cousin Bart. But what- 
ever happens, we can't shout about it over the 
'phone. Be would be sure to come in right in the 
middle of it. Cousin Bart will have to meet us 
somewhere." 

"He 's always home early on Saturday, so we 
can see him over there — outside somewhere, where 
we won't get flu. That would be better than 
having him come here," Betty said, rising. 

"Don't you want to tell him about it?" Peg 
inquired, as they moved together toward the door 
on their way to the telephone in the hall. "It 
is n't all my party, you know." 

"I can't," Betty returned. "I 've promised not 
to." 

"That 's so," Peg agreed. "All right. I '11 
see if he won't send over for us. Now you run 
upstairs and entertain Be while I 'm talking. We 
don't want her to hear what 's going on. We just 
can't run the risk yet." 

Betty ran up the stair, and Peg took down the 
telephone receiver. She had a thorough realiza- 
tion of the seriousness of the situation and was 
more than ready to shift the responsibility upon 
older shoulders; but she thought it entirely prob- 
able that the fate of bonis de Soulange would be 
determined by the way Captain Badger was 
treated, and, had she possessed the amount of the 
ransom demanded, her inclination would have 
been to hand it to the man at once. But she felt 
also the force of Betty's contention that they had 
no way of holding the officer to his word. Prob- 
ably her Cousin Bart would know how to meet 
that difficulty, and she was most anxious to lay 
the entire matter before him. 

She was connected with Mr. Powell's office 
promptly, but was surprised by the information 
that he had already gone home. 

"Is n't that rather unusual?" she asked. 

"I don't think he was feeling very well," came 
the answer, and with a "Thank you," Peg rang 
off. 

"Be is n't in her room," Betty said, as she re- 
turned to Peg. "What did Father say?" 

"He 's gone home," Peg replied. "They said 
he was n't feeling very well." 

"I believe he 's got the flu now!" cried Betty, 
and, as if in confirmation of this presentiment, 
Selma came into the hall. 



[May 

"Oh, you are there!" exclaimed the maid. 
"There are messages. Miss Travers, she has 
gone to Chestnut Hill. They send for her be- 
cause Mr. Powell, he is in bed with this flu. The 
nurse have it herself very much. These nurses 
they are no good!" 

"Oh, poor Mother!" cried Betty, in dismay. 
Peg was quite as sympathetic, but she could n't 
help wondering a little what would happen now 
that Mr. Powell could not be consulted in regard 
to Be's affairs. Who else was there to whom she 
could go for advice? The two older Powell boys 
were at college. Mr. Powell's partner was an 
invalid who had not been active in the business 
for years; and she could think of no one else, 
on whose advice she could rely, to whom she felt 
free to go. 

And to-morrow, in twenty-four hours, Captain 
Badger would expect to receive his answer. 

"Oh, Betty," she murmured, "what are we 
going to do?" 

CHAPTER XVI 

BEATRICE BEGINS EXPLORING 

When Beatrice, on hearing the door of the spring- 
house being pushed open, had allowed the trap- 
door above her head to settle gently in place, she 
crouched down upon the narrow step. She 
could hear a muffled footfall upon the paving, 
the faint creek of the rusty door hinges, and then 
all was silent. 

She sat for a lime quite motionless, with her 
ears strained to catch further sounds. Not 
hearing anything, she fell to speculating as to her 
future course. She would, of course, tell Peg 
at once, and together they would set about their 
exploration at the first opportunity that offered; 
but until this was accomplished, she wished to 
run no risk of her discovery being made public, 
for in that case it would get to the knowledge of 
Miss Maple, who, Be was sure, would take prompt 
measures to stop their investigations. The more 
she considered the matter, the more determined 
she became to lie concealed until she could escape 
undetected. 

As she sat trying to make up her mind that 
whoever had come into the spring-house must 
have gone again, so quiet was it, she became 
aware of the distant murmur of voices. The 
sound came very faintly, ceasing for a moment, 
only to begin again a moment later. By most 
attentive listening she concluded it was a man 
who spoke; but she could not catch a syllable of 
his words or the reply to them. Nothing but a 
gentle humming came to her, and she concluded 
that whoever it was must be outside of the house. 

"It must be two of the gardeners," she thought 



THE LUCK OF DENEWOOD 



625 



to herself; "they won't stay long." And she 
settled herself to wait patiently till they went 
away. 

But the voice droned on and Beatrice began to 
grow cramped by her position. She gazed down 
and became aware of a gray blur at the bottom of 
the steps, as if a wandering ray of light had strayed 
in to brighten the gloom of the tunnel. Also, 
now that her eyes had grown accustomed to the 
darkness, she could see that the floor of the pass- 
age was only a few feet 
below her, and her curi- 
osity was aroused once 
more. As long as she 
was forced to remain 
hidden, there was no 
reason why she should 
not do a little explor- 
ing by herself, and, with 
much caution against 
making a noise, she half- 
lowered herself down the 
two or three steps to the 
bottom. Then she stood 
up and bumped her head 
against the roof. 

"Alafoi," was her men- 
ial exclamation, "this was 
not made for tall men like 
me!" And she rubbed 
the spot that for a mo- 
ment ached sharply. 

Then she looked about 
her, trying to distin- 
guish something of her 
surroundings, but there 
was not enough light 
to see anything- clearly. 
The dim grayness seemed 

to come from a point farther along the narrow 
passage and she advanced toward it. 

With bowed head, and with hands stretched 
out before her, she moved cautiously, feeling 
carefully with her feet before she ventured to 
take a forward step. Slowly she progressed 
until she came at length to the spot of greatest 
illumination. 

Even here Be could make out little save a 
flight of stone steps leading up to another door 
that seemed shadowy and unsubstantial in the 
gloom. 

She stopped a moment and looked up, trying 
to get her bearings and to calculate where she 
might be now in relation to the big house. The 
faint light she saw came through slits in the 
masonry that were almost filled with the accumu- 
lated dust of years. Evidently these openings 
could not be underground, and she argued that 



they must be in the massive walls of Denewood 
itself, in which case she had traversed the distance 
from the spring-house to the mansion, and from 
here on would mount to the second story until 
she came out in the shallow space behind the 
hobs in the nursery fireplace which her little 
ancestress Peggy Travers had found. 

Beatrice was uncertain whether to go on or to 
wait till she could explore the place thoroughly 
with her cousin, but the steps seemed to invite 




BEATRICE PUSHED AGAINST THE STONES ABOVE HER HEAD" (SEE NEXT PAGE ) 

her to climb them and, thinking just to peep at 
what lay behind the door, she mounted them 
cautiously. 

It grew darker as she went up, and when her 
groping hands met a barrier across her path she 
was forced to depend almost wholly on her sense 
of touch. Feeling nothing but rough planks 
under her fingers, she groped about for a knob or 
handle with which to open the heavy door. But 
she could find no:hing of the sort. 

"I mus' push it," she thought. But the stout 
timbers refused to yield to her efforts. 

"Hum!" murmured Be, puzzled, "per'aps it is 
not a door at all, but a built-up partition, cutting 
off the passage from the house." 

This idea seemed so very probable that the 
girl felt a sharp sensation of disappointment, but 
she rallied her courage, determined not to be cast 
down too quickly. 



626 



THE LUCK OF DENEWOOD 



"I mus' 'ave a light," she said to herself, "then 
it will be all right." 

She turned and went down the stairs slowly 
and started on her return journey under ground. 
But this time she had her back to the faint rays 
coming in through the slits, and ahead of her the 
passage was jet black. Step by step she picked 
her way until at length she came to an abrupt 
stop against a wall. Realizing that she must 
have reached the end, she felt about and found 
steps leading up. 

Carefully she climbed, lifting her head with 
caution until her hair brushed lightly against the 
roof; then she held her breath, listening intently 
for the sound of the voice that had kept her in 



hiding. All was still. The speakers, whoever they 
might be, had evidently gone, and Beatrice de- 
cided that now was the time for her to make her 
escape unseen. 

She raised her arms and pushed against the 
stones above her head, expecting to lift the little 
door easily; but nothing moved, and the girl, 
bracing her feet against the narrow steps, pushed 
harder, only to feel the same rigidity. In a sud- 
den panic, Beatrice thrust upward" with all her 
might, but still no door opened; and after a 
period of useless and frantic effort, she sank 
breathless in a little heap on the rough steps. 

"I am caught," she murmured in despair, "and 
nobody knows where to look for me!" 



(Tu be continued) 



"HERE BEGINNETH 

By BERT( 

A bulbul is — hush, youngsters, hush!— 
"A brachypodine babbling thrush." 

To bullate is to boil. I '11 vow, 
You did n't know that, did you now? 

A bummalo 's a kind of fish 
Which Hindus think a dainty dish. 

A burbot is another kind, 

Which has a long, long fin behind. 

A bunder is a landing-stage. 
And now suppose we turn a page. 

A citril is a sort of bird 

Of which, till now, you have n't heard; 

To clarigate is to recite 

A list of wrongs you wish to right; 



THE FIRST LESSON" 

M BRALEY 

A clathrodictyon is a sort 

Of coral rock — to put it short. 

And now again a page we turn 

In search of something else to learn. 

To doyst is but to take a fall. 
Did you know that before, at all? 

The ecderon 's the outer skin; 
A fonduk is a sort of inn; 

A gledge is just a knowing look — 
Thus we could go on through the book 

Absorbing much of information 
And adding to our education; 

But we must stop — it 's necessary 
That I return this dictionary. 



p 



reserve 

by Adeline K.MdcGilvarY 




Bob Crane's room-mate at 
Shingleton's was his idol and 
hero — Wallis Wallace; of 
course, a much older boy, a 
senior, in fact, and the leading 
athlete and all-round cham- 
pion of the school. 

It was by a great stroke of 
i luck, Bob thought, that he 
had happened to fall into such 
a desirable situation, and he 
naturally made Wallis hi* 
father confessor and adviser. Bob was very con- 
scientious, which was one of the traits the older 
fellow liked in him. Wallis took the world rather 
seriously, too, and so never cracked a smile when 
Bob sat down before him one day and asked: 
"Do you think it 's wrong to steal sugar?" 
"Depends," was the answer, because he had a 
good notion what was in the little fellow's mind. 

"You know what they do," Bob continued; 
"they scoop out their buns and fill them with 
sugar. Is n't that plain stealing?" 

"Well," replied the senior, thoughtfully rubbing 
his nose, "the fellows have been doing it for gen- 
erations and the faculty is wise to it. It is n't done 
in an underhand way, so I don't see any harm in 
it, to tell you the truth." 

His conscience lulled to rest by this assurance, 
Bob bounded off to communicate an idea to his 
favorite classmates who were congregated on the 
steps in front of their dormitory. 

"Come close, fellows!" he called, waving his 
arms with an inward, sweeping motion. "Here 's 
a dandy scheme I Ye got!" 

There were five boys, his pet cronies, who 
quickly obeyed the summons. 

"You know old Tom Juniper?" he began, nam- 
ing the colored man who worked on the place. "I 
was talking to him the other day and got a good 
tip from him. He says to take ripe, sound per- 
simmons, put sugar on them, and leave them for a 
while, and you '11 have the best-tasting candied 
fruit you ever ate in your life." 

The boys had a good-sized hoard of sugar, 
which they had obtained by means of the bun 
route. Each boy was allowed to take one bun 
from the breakfast -table to refresh him during the 
morning recess. They were nice, crusty buns with 
soft centers, and, as Bob said, the boys had a way 
of scooping out the centers — which they never 
wasted, however — and filling the hollowed-out 



place with sugar. Generally, the little individual 
hoards would be pooled and a grand feast of fudge 
stirred up by Spindle Kirby, the fudge expert of 
the class. 

Spindle never failed, — his fudge was always 
smooth and excellent, — while Bob's scheme was 
untried and uncertain, so it took a lot of persua- 
sion and eloquence on Bob's part to get the others 
to give up their hoards for the purpose he pro- 
posed. At last Spindle himself agreed and the 
others followed. 

The next day being clear and cold after a frosty 
night, the six went out after persimmons, and by 
their united efforts succeeded in bringing back 
over a bushel. They brought them all up to Bob's 
room, the upper-classman being away. 

"The question is," said Dick Hollander, the 
class pessimist, "now that you Ye got it, what 're 
you going to do with it? It 's an awful lot of stuff. 
We have n't anything half big enough to hold it." 

"The bath-tub would be just the thing," sug- 
gested Pete Rainey, "but I suppose there 'd be 
objections." 

"Aw, nobody uses the tub!" said Spindle. 
"Long 's the showers are working, the tub 's just 
an ornament." 

"Mrs. Chase would n't stand for it," Dick said. 

"No, she would n't," agreed Bob, who had once 
tested the housekeeper's endurance by trying to 
keep water-snakes in the hand-basin. 

Meanwhile, Toby Collins had been searching 
the room with his keen gray eye, which was now 
fixed on an object under the window. 

"Why don't you put them in your trunk?" he 
suggested. "Would n't hurt it if you put good 
stout paper down first." 

"That is n't my trunk," Bob said. "It 's Wal's. 
That 's mine." 

Toby went and examined Bob's. 

"Very flimsy," was his verdict; "nothing but 
canvas over rattan. 1 1 would n't keep the air out. 
My mother always says you have to keep the air 
out when you 're preserving fruit." 

"That 's right," Spindle corroborated; "air 
spoils fruit." 

Wallis's trunk was a new one — black and shiny 
on the outside, the inside being lined with fine 
linen. It had a very air-tight appearance. It was 
also empty, and Wallis used it for a window-seat, 
with two handsome cushions on top. 

"I don't think we 'd better use his," Bob pro- 
tested, as his companions examined the trunk. 



627 



628 



PRESERVES 



"It would n't hurt it," said Spindle. 'We '11 
put plenty of papers down, and we won't put 
any but sound persimmons in. They '11 probably 
candy hard as rocks. I had some once from Japan 
and they were fine — just like gum-drops." 



IMay 




'"LOOK AT THIS!' EXCLAIMED WALLIS. 'THERE 'S A PUDDLE HERE BY MY TRUNK 

"He 'd skin you alive if his new trunk was 
spoiled," remarked Dick, cheerfully. 

"Well, it is n't going to be spoiled, so shut up!" 
cried Toby. 

"Have n't any of you fellows got a trunk?" 
asked Bob. "I don't like to use his without any 
say so." 

They had trunks, but none of them would do: 
Toby's room-mate was "nosey"; Pete's and 



Spindle's trunks were full ; Dick's was broken; and 
Silent Turk Hemmingway's smelt of moth-balls. 

"We '11 give him several pounds," said Spin- 
dle. "He '11 be tickled when he gets a whiff of 
them when they 're done!" 

"I '11 get some tough 
paper," Pete volunteered. 
"Nobody 'd guess what 
was inside,' 1 the Silent 
Turk put in. 

They took the tray out 
and laid in the bottom 
some brown paper which. 
Pete had fetched from 
his room. On this the per- 
simmons were arranged 
— a layer of fruit, then a 
generous layer of sugar, 
and so on. Down came 
the lid at last and the 
deed was done. 

"How long will it take, 
I wonder?" Bob asked, 
rearranging the pillows 
on top. 

"A couple of weeks, 
I 'd say," opined Tobv, 
whose mother was always 
sending him delicious 
jams and who therefore 
was considered some- 
thing of an authority. 

At first, Bob secretly 
worried over the persim- 
mons being in their un- 
invited resting-place; but 
as the days rolled by, 
other interests took his 
mind from them. In fact, 
he had almost forgotten 
about them when one 
evening, as he was going 
to bed, Wallis, who sat 
studying at the table, 
yawned, stretched, and 
exclaimed, "Well, I 'm 
through boning this 
night !" Then he got up 
and went to the window, 
opened it, sat down on his trunk, and looked 
out into the beautiful night. 

He sat silent awhile shuffling his feet. He 
kept shuffling and shuffling until it got on Bob's 
nerves so that if it had been any one else but 
Wallis, there would have been some sharp words. 
As it was, Bob lay awake watching his hero's 
handsome profile against the window. Shuffle, 
shuffle, shuffle! Wal surely had the fidgets. He 



PRESERVES 



629 



seemed to realize it himself, all of a sudden, and 
looked down. 

"What the dickens!" he muttered. "I feel 's if 
I was all gummed up in the feet. Just turn on 
that light, will you?" 

Even then Bob did not think of persimmons as 
he reached up and turned the switch. 

"Look at this!" exclaimed Wallis. "There 's a 
kind of a puddle here by my trunk!" 

Then Bob remembered, and a cold chill ran 
down his spine ! He felt all was not well with his 
preserves. 

Wallis was stooping 
over. "It'sgummy!"he 
announced in a puzzled 
tone. "It 's oozing out 
of my trunk!" 

He hurriedly threw 
off his prized pillows 
and began to explore. 
Out came the tray, and 
there, spread before his 
astonished eyes, was a 
vast sticky expanse of 
something like molas- 
ses, with mysterious 
lumps in it! 

"Holy mackerel !" ex- 
claimed W'allis, rage 
and surprise mingling 
in his breast. He rose 
to his full six feet and 
turned an accusing eye 
on the bed of his room- 
mate. It was empty. 
Bob, a lightning dress- 
er, had donned his 
trousers and fled. 

Wallis did not de- 
mean himself to pur- 
sue. He closed the trunk and went to bed, biding 
his time. 

Bob, meanwhile, had gone to his friends with the 
awful tidings. 

"The stuff has n't candied," he explained; "it 's 
oozing out!" 

"I thought it would," murmured Dick. 

"But it is n't your fault," said Pete. 

Finally Spindle said: "I '11 go back with you 
later and explain. Better wait a couple of hours." 

So it was long after "hours" when two figures 
slid into Wal's room. 

"Are you awake, sir?" a meek voice inquired. 

"Not only sneaky, but a coward," growled a 
scornful bass from the bed. 

"I 'm sorry," Bob said in a more manly tone, 
"and I '11 save up and buy you another trunk if it 
takes me twenty years!" 



"I '11 need it before that," Wal replied. 

"We '11 clean it up," put in Spindle, cheerfully. 
"It 's such a fine trunk a little syrup could n't 
hurt it." 

"H umph !" 

"Honest, Wal, we did n't know it would do any 
harm and we meant to surprise you." 
"You 've succeeded!" 

"Well, you can come on and give me a couple of 
good ones whenever you 've a mind to," offered 
Bob. "Me too," said Spindle. 




'ALL IT NEEDED WAS A LITTLE MORE SUGAR.' PETE SAID" 



"That 's just what I '11 do if you two don't shut 
up and let me sleep," was the reply — rather 
grouchy, to be sure, but Bob knew his hero. The 
incident was closed. 

Next day Bob and his friends attacked the 
trunk energetically, and, after much effort, re- 
stored it almost to its original state. After which, 
armed with spoons, they gathered around a 
strange collection of pans, chafing-dishes, hand- 
basins, glasses, cups, and other vessels, and began 
a grand and glorious feast composed of persimmon 
syrup . 

"Fudge for mine!" was Spindle's choking ver- 
dict after several spoonsful. 

"All it needed was a little more sugar," Pete 
said. "I 'd like to try my luck at it, but my trunk 
is full. Can't one of you fellows spare one?" 

Nobody could. 



BOY HUNTERS IN DEMERARA 



By GEORGE INNESS HARTLEY 



CHAPTER XV 

THE ARMADILLO CREEK 

The following morning Paul had a glimpse of a 
side of jungle travel which was new to him. One 
of the Bovianders had been bitten by vampire- 
bats during the night, and was so weakened by 
the loss of blood that he was unable to take his 
accustomed place that day at the paddle. 

This is a rather common occurrence in the 
South American tropics, but is easily guarded 
against by sleeping within the light of a tire or 
lantern. Unfortunately for the half-breed, the 
oil lantern, which had been hung beneath their 
temporary palm-leaf shelter, flickered out during 
the early hours, and he had been the recipient of a 
visit from these bloodthirsty bats. 

The vampire of the Guianas is a small beast, 
scarcely twice as large as our own tiny house-bat, 
but of most savage instincts. Doubtless they feed 
on the juices of fruit, perhaps on insects, but the 
desire for warm blood is uppermost. Dogs suffer 
greatly, the puppies in particular; so do chickens. 
Horses and cattle are bitten on the withers, be- 
tween their shoulders out of reach of their tails; 
these wounds become infected and sometimes 
cause death. But as far as I have observed, 
only domesticated animals are attacked ; the wild 
beasts are immune, or know how to care for 
themselves. 

The bat alights softly on its sleeping victim 
and crawls to the desired spot; on a man, this is 
generally his great toe, if it protrudes from 
beneath his blanket, though an arm or any other 
portion of his body will do if that choice morsel 
is hidden. Having reached the point of operation, 
the bat's needle-like canine teeth penetrate the 
skin so gently and so gradually that the sleeper 
is not aroused by any sudden twinge of pain. 
Others, attracted by the prospect of a meal, hover 
above, and when the first has satisfied itself, a 
second takes its place; or it may make another 
incision on a different portion of the body. 

The Boviander had been bitten twice, and the 
wounds had bled freely during the night. There 
was nothing to do but to disinfect the tiny holes 
and allow him to remain a passenger in the 
bateau throughout the day. By the next morn- 
ing he would be all right. 

Paul saw the reason now why his hammock had 
been incased in light mosquito-netting. It so 
happens that mosquitos are rather scarce in that 
bit of forest, and he had wondered, on turning in, 



the needless precaution. He had received his 
answer. 

A week went by. They had traversed thirty 
miles of river. Imagine— thirty miles in seven 
days! But there were numerous rapids to sur- 
mount, some separated from each other by only a 
few hundred yards of calm water. One cataract, 
a stretch of broken water two miles long, delayed 
them three days. But at the end of the week, 
with a decrease in the number of rapids, their 
progress became faster. 

At the dose of the second week they had made 
ninety miles against the current and were ap- 
proaching their destination, a narrow creek which 
turned westward. All signs of human habitation 
had been left behind. For the last twenty miles 
not even a lonely Indian benab had graced the 
river bank. 

The boys had been deeply interested in these 
native habitations. Generally, instead of a sin- 
gle benab, there was a cluster of half a dozen huts 
gathered beneath a greenheart on a bluff which 
overlooked the river. Always, tethered to the 
bank, were the inevitable dugout canoes. The 
benabs were usually without walls and consisted 
of four poles stuck in the ground, on which rested 
a palm-thatched roof. 

Within these shelters they could see grass- 
woven hammocks stretched, and little fires burn- 
ing, beside which crouched figures of women 
preparing cassava or weaving. The men oc- 
cupied the hammocks. Naked children splashed 
in the water and made faces at them as they 
passed. 

Once, when they had landed, the entire village 
had fied to the shelter of the jungle, and even 
Wa'na had much trouble to entice them back. 

On the afternoon of the sixteenth day they 
camped at the mouth of the creek which was to 
carry them to the end of their quest. 

Paul and Fred, as was their custom upon land- 
ing for the day, chose a line with their compasses ' 
and set off on a collecting-trip, breaking twigs as 
they advanced to mark the way for the return 
journey to camp. The contour of the country 
was little altered from what it had been at their 
first camp above the falls; the hills were higher, 
but, if anything, it was less rocky. 

When barely out of sight of camp, they jumped 
a small brocket deer, which Paul by a fortunate 
shot dropped in its tracks. Elated by his suc- 
cess, the stout boy dragged his game back to 
camp, telling Fred that he would return directly. 



BOY HUNTERS IN DEMERARA 



631 



Hardly had his chum disappeared when the 
other became aware of a rustling overhead, and 
was deluged by a shower of falling dirt. Chok- 
ing, he stepped away from the dusty cloud which 
enveloped him and looked up for the cause of the 
disturbance. It was not hard to find. 

Thirty feet above, plastered against the trunk 
of a large tree, hung a big termites' nest. In a 
crotch just above it was a reddish animal about 
the size of an Irish terrier, with a long thin snout 
and projecting claws several inches in length. 
It was these claws, tearing at the nest below, 
which were responsible for his discomfort. 

Fred hesitated to shoot. He recognized the 
creature as the lesser ant-eater of the Guianas, 
the tamandu, or, as it is locally named, the 
"yesi," and wished to see it at work. The gentle 
beast, unafraid of his presence or of the gunshot 
a few minutes before, dug its four-clawed feet 
into the shell of dried mud and wrenched off a 
huge chunk. Then, lowering its body, clinging 
downward, partly by hooking its rear claws into 
a crevice in the bark and partly by winding its 
long prehensile tail about the trunk, it thrust its 
narrow snout into the opening, which Fred could 
see was alive with hurrying termites. 

He saw the thin red tongue dart out and lick 
over the busy swarm. When it was withdrawn, 
it carried with it a hundred of the tiny workers. 
Again and again it flicked out, like the darting 
tongue of a snake, and each time returned with 
a full load. Presently that portion of the nest 
was cleared and the claws again tore at the mud 
partitions. 

The movements of the tamandu were slow and 
wearied. It seemed bored to death by the whole 
proceeding, and, sloth-like, took its time about 
it. As Fred approached a little closer to obtain 
a better view, it desisted in its attacks and turned 
a tiny, inquiring eye upon him as if to ask, "Well, 
what can I do for you?" 

"Nothing at all, thanks," mocked the boy, as 
if the ant-eater had really spoken. "You 're 
the queerest looking duck I 've seen for many a 
day." 

At his words the creature blinked and turned 
its back on him, ignoring his presence while it 
worked. Much delighted by this show of utter 
indifference, Fred tossed a stone at the nest. It 
struck true, six inches below the protruding snout. 
The tamandu ceased its licking of termites, threw 
a reproachful glance at him, and departed leisurely 
to the crotch above, where it rolled itself into a 
ball and went to sleep. Laughing, Fred withdrew 
to a convenient log. He could not shoot that 
ant-eater, even for the sake of science. 

Five minutes later he was aroused by a scratch- 
ing of branches. It was not the tamandu, for 



that indifferent creature was still in the land of 
slumber, but came from another tree some yards 
distant. Presently a band of small squirrel - 
monkeys appeared, advancing in single file in his 
direction. There were fully thirty in the troupe, 
and their path led along a limb which stretched 
but a few yards above him. 

He did not shoot; "sakiwinkis" were plentiful, 
and he had no desire to killone. If only wounded, 
probably it would fall to the ground and stare at 
him with weeping eyes; dashing away the tears 
with one little paw, it would innocently hold up 
its hurt as if asking for his caress. He had seen 
that before, and it had been too much for him. 

They scrambled through a small spreading tree 
which was literally covered with vines. The 
lianas were massed so thick that the outline of 
the trunk was entirely hidden by the drapery of 
creepers, to the tangle of which was added an 
accumulation of dead leaves and rotten wood 
from the branches above. The squirrel-monkeys 
headed straight for this dense clump, and Fred 
saw them spread out to feed on the luscious wild 
figs which spotted the vines. 

Suddenly there was a commotion in their ranks, 
a scattering of leaves, a dislodging of dead wood, 
a snarl, and the monkeys scampered chattering 
to the upper branches. A small tawny body 
had sprung among them from its hiding-place 
near the trunk. There was a squeal of pain as 
the beast seized one of the monkeys. 

Fred's gun snapped angrily to his shoulder, 
and taking hasty aim, he fired. A half-human 
cry echoed the shot, and the savage creature 
bounded from the tree, carrying the dead saki- 
winkis with it. As it touched the ground, the 
indignant boy fired again. The animal bounded 
into the air as if tossed by springs, then threshed 
among the bushes until its struggles gradually 
ceased. 

Fred discovered that he had killed an ocelot. 
Instead of having a pure tawny body, as he had 
thought at first, it was covered with black spots, 
like a diminutive leopard. Its slim, lithe body was 
four feet in length, counting the long tail; without 
it, the beast measured barely half that. 

Mightily pleased with himself, the hunter 
slung the cat by the tail over his shoulder, and, 
gathering the mangled sakiwinkis, started for 
camp. If he met Paul, it would now be the turn 
of that individual to wait. 

As camp was scarcely three hundred yards away 
he hid but a short distance to walk. About two 
thirds of it had been covered when he saw Paul 
approaching at a fast gait, evidently anxious to 
see what his chum had shot. Fred dropped his 
load and stood waiting. 

But Paul did not reach his friend. 



632 



BOY HUNTERS IN DEMERARA 



I May 



Fifty yards away he halted sharply, then 
backed hurriedly off from some object on the 
ground. Again he approached it, cautiously 
this time, and stared for several moments. A 
second time, with what looked like a shudder to 




WHAT KE YOU DOIN' THERE? BEATIN" A RUG?' 



Fred, he backed fearfully away, keeping his eyes 
fixed on the object. When questioned afterward, 
he declared that he only shrugged his shoulders 
and walked away contemptuously. But that was 
Paul's story. This is how Fred saw it. 

At a safe distance from the thing, the stout 
boy paused beside a tall sapling, and, bending it 
down, severed it with his hunting-knife. Pres- 
ently he had in his hands a long twenty-foot 



pole. Raising this upright over his head, he 
advanced cautiously and with hesitation, linger- 
ing over each step, in the direction of the hidden 
object. When within thirty feet of it, his prog- 
ress slowed to inches and with long intervals 
between steps. Once he 
paused irresolutely, and 
made a motion to fling 
away his pole and flee, 
but, thinking better of it , 
urged himself forward. 

At twenty feet he again 
paused and measured the 
distance with his eye. 
No; it still seemed too far 
off. Two feet more and 
he halted abruptly. Ap- 
parently that was as near 
as he cared to approach. 
The pole wavered in the 
air, but he hesitated to 
let it descend. Then, 
nerving himself on and 
gritting his teeth, — Fred 
could see him do that, 
— he brought the sap- 
ling down with all his 
strength. 

There was a thud and 
a rustling of leaves. A 
second time Paul lifted 
the pole and again down 
it thumped. The rust- 
ling decreased, but the 
blows continued with ris- 
ing fun - . 

The curiosity of the 
watching boy was 
strained to the bursting 
point. When he could 
stand it no longer he start- 
ed forward, demanding: 
"What 're you doin' 
there? Beatin' a rug?" 

At the sound of his 
voice the large boy de- 
sisted in his efforts and 
turned with a start. 
"That you, Skinny? 
No; I \e got a snake here. Did n't want to 
spoil it by shooting, so used a stick to kill it." 

"Why did n't you use a mora, while you were 
about it?" 

Paul glanced at the sapling and grinned rather 
sheepishly. Suddenly he grew indignant. 

"I don't see what a mora 's got to do with it. 
This pole was the first thing I could find. I was 
afraid the snake 'd get away and I had to hurry. 



102 1 1 



BOY HUNTERS IN DEMERARA 



633 



At first I thought I 'd use my gun-stock, but was 
afraid of breaking it." 

Poor Paul! He did not know his chum had 
witnessed the whole performance; but he was to 
find it out around the camp-fire that night. 

"Let 's look at it," continued Fred, smiling to 
himself. "What is it? A twelve-foot bushmas- 
ter? Jimmy! It is one!" 

He bent over the dead reptile and stirred it with 
a stick. It was medium sized for its species, 
about eight feet long, and with two enormous 
fangs which, when the boy prodded the head, 
protruded a full inch. The slender, reddish- 
yellow body was beautifully crossed by blackish 
bands which enclosed patches of brown and 
lighter color; and to the tip of the tail grew a 
small spine. 

The bushmaster is one of the deadliest snakes 
which inhabit the Western Hemisphere, and, 
among poisonous reptiles, is outrivaled in size 
only by the king cobra of India. Fortunately, it 
is mainly nocturnal in habits and is, therefore, 
seldom seen in the jungle. 

Having completed his examination, Fred turned 
lo his companion. 

"Pick her up, Fat, and come on." 

"Huh? Me?" 

"Sure. I 've got an ocelot to carry." 

"What! Did you shoot an ocelot that time? 
Let me see it !" 

When Paul had looked the cat over thoroughly 
and bemoaned his bad fortune at not being there 
at the death, they retraced their steps toward 
camp. After a few yards had been covered, 
Fred noticed that his chum was not carrying the 
bushmaster. 

"Where 's your snake?" he demanded. 

Paul stopped short and slapped his thigh in dis- 
gust with himself, nevertheless looking a bit 
guilty. He shuddered inwardly. 

"There, I forgot it!" he declared loudly; then, 
catching a sparkle in his friend's eye, added with 
heat, "I did, too!" and mournfully turned to 
retrieve the reptile! 

CHAPTER XVI 

STUNG ! 

Three days of journeying up the creek brought 
the party to their destination. Another day was 
consumed in erecting a semi-permanent camp. 
Instead of tents, palm shelters were built, under 
which they slung their hammocks. A shed 
covered their supplies, a second acted as their 
kitchen, and the bateau, moored firmly to the 
shore, was used as the laboratory. A plentiful 
supply of blankets had been brought, for the 
nights were cooler than near the coast. The 



camp rested at the base of some rather high foot- 
hills, and Milton figured the altitude to be nearly 
a thousand feet above their base on the lower 
river. 

The next four or five days were spent in comb- 
ing the jungle for giant armadillos. Wa'na was 
the first to discover a burrow. It was situated 
about a mile from camp, a tunnel large enough 
for a man to crawl into; but it was an ancient 
affair, evidently unused for several months. Both 
Walee and Jack had caught a glimpse of one of 
the creatures near the creek, but it had eluded 
their search. 

The boys were as zealous in their efforts as the 
rest, but just as unlucky — even more so. Not 
even a single track rewarded their endeavors. 

One morning, Fred, armed with a camera and 
accompanied by Walee, was fortunate enough to 
obtain a few good photographs along the upper 
reaches of the creek. On their return, Walee 
killed a taira and the boy caught a small, white- 
faced opossum alive, which he carried in triumph 
back to camp. 

The taira, or hacka, was a savage-looking 
carnivore belonging to the weasel family, with a 
long, rather thick body and short legs. Without 
its bushy tail, it measured about two feet in 
length and weighed nearly forty pounds. The 
strong jaw was armed with ugly teeth and gave 
the animal the appearance of a fighter. In color 
it was black as far forward as the shoulders, and 
iron-gray on head and neck. They are quite 
common in the Guiana jungle, inhabiting the 
ground, but, if suddenly startled, often scramble 
half-way up a tree-trunk and cling to the rough 
bark with their claws until the pursuer has passed 
on in search of worthier meat. 

The little white-faced opossum, hardly more 
than a foot long, was a rare creature, and Fred 
felt justly proud of his find. He had been at- 
tracted to it by a rustling in a low-hanging mass 
of vines, and had caught it rifling the nest of an 
ant-bird. Having with difficulty snapped it in 
the act, he was much delighted with himself. 

Paul, put slightly on his mettle, set out at 
once to see what he could find. As was his cus- 
tom, he seated himself a few hundred yards from 
camp and waited for developments. 

There seemed to be great excitement among a 
group of small birds in the bushes a short distance 
away. He was used to these passing troupes, 
and jjaid this one small attention. He had seen 
as many as twenty different species grouped to- 
gether, traveling through the forest on a hunt for 
food. Once he had witnessed the assembling of 
a flock, and had followed it until it broke up and 
its members went their different ways. 

An excited ant-bird had been responsible for 



634 



BOY HUNTERS IN DEMERARA 



that whole affair. Aroused by an unexpected 
abundance of insects on the bush which it had 
come to search, it had commenced to squeak with 
joy. Instantly it was joined by a second, a 
browner bird, its mate, followed by other ant- 
birds. A quadrille-bird had piped from the un- 
dergrowth, and several humming-birds hung in 
the air. 

And then the troupe had moved ; the bush was 
exhausted of its insects. The hummers had 
flashed after microscopic flies beneath the atten- 
tion of the rest, and other ant-birds had turned 
over the leaves on the ground to see what they 
could find. For two hundred yards the new-born 
Hock had maintained its concerted hunt and 
incessant jabber, then evaporated as rapidly as it 
had gathered. 

The present troupe advanced slowly in the 
direction of the boy. The cries of the birds 
seemed a little louder than usual and a bit more 
excited, but Paul was not particularly interested. 
He was after larger game that day. 

Presently the noisy participants were all about 
him. He noticed the presence of a large number 
ot white-crested individuals in the low bushes 
which littered the place, and a dull hum filled 
the air. 

The buzzing sound interested him somewhat, 
and he casually examined his surroundings. To 
his surprise, all the winged insects in the neigh- 
borhood appeared to be hovering in the air as if 
uncertain where to alight. A faint sound— he 
could amost feel it instead of hear it — as of the 
very gentlest zephyr of wind rustling the foliage, 
aroused him. There was no definite direction 
to it ; it was everywhere, above, below, and on all 
sides. 

He felt a sharp sting on his wrist, another on 
his neck, and several on his left arm. Leaping up 
with a howl, he slapped frantically at the smart- 
ing places. He was covered with ants! The log 
on which he sat was alive with them, the ground 
was crawling with them, and a thousand had 
swarmed over his body. 

Fortunately for Paul, his clothing resisted the 
worst of their efforts, and when he had dislodged 
those that had found his skin, he was able to keep 
the remainder at bay until he had retreated to a 
more favorable spot. There he discovered that 
the pugnacious little beasts were not so easily 
brushed off as one would expect. They worked at 
both ends, their long pincer jaws clamped tight 
into the khaki cloth and their pointed abdomens 
curled under in an effort to pierce its thickness 
with their venomous stings. It took five minutes 
to rid himself of the half-inch pests, and he was 
not without wounds when the job was finished. 

He had heard of army-ants, but had never been 



[May 

in contact with them before. He knew they led 
a roaming life, living beneath a stump in one 
locality while t hey searched the surrounding terri- 
tory for food, and, when it was cleared of insects, 
moving on. Now he had a chance to view them 
at work. 

An area a hundred feet in width and twice that 
in depth was covered with the tiny creatures. 
Paul estimated there was an ant for every two 
square inches of space, and that without counting 
the individuals which climbed the trees. Whole 
regiments swarmed up the trunks— how far up 
they traveled he could not be certain— and entire 
companies deployed in the saplings, where they 
explored every little nook and every leaf. The 
shrubs and bushes were relegated merely to pla- 
toons, but platoons with a strength that would 
reach into the thousands. Fully as many worked 
above the ground as upon it, and his estimate of 
four million probably fell far short of the true total. 

The horde advanced slowly, presenting an even 
front; and as in true warfare, a cloud of skirmish- 
ers were thrown out ahead. These quartered the 
ground, routing out their victims, the wood- 
roaches, crickets, beetles, and others, and drove 
them back into the jaws of the main force. This 
made short work of the unlucky ones. 

The boy saw an enormous roach scuttle back, 
with a skirmisher fastened to one of its legs. An 
instant later it emerged with a rush from under 
the dead leaf where it had taken refuge. To it 
now clung twenty ants, all using their nippers and 
seeking a niche in its chitin armor into which 
they might thrust their stings. One evidently 
succeeded, for the insect stopped abruptly in it's 
mad race for freedom and at once was buried be- 
neath a struggling, bloodthirsty mob. First a leg 
disappeared, then all of them; its wings followed, 
its head, a piece of abdomen, then it was all 
gone. Within thirty seconds the roach was en 
route, piecemeal, for the rear. 

A giant centipede, six inches long, fled from 
beneath a log, but was pulled down before it had 
traversed twenty feet, and a minute later followed 
the way of the roach. Other insects, well able to 
fly, made the attempt too late, and, with a demon 
or two clinging to them, fell back to earth to be 
torn apart. 

A hundred birds feasted on those that escaped. 
The little white-crested ant-birds which composed 
half the troupe, spurned the frightened insects, 
and contented themselves only with the ants. 
Paul caught an enormous locust and tossed it to 
the army, which dismembered it with amazing 
speed; but when he threw in a dead bird, the 
ants walked around it and touched it not. 

Having watched the operations of the army in 
the field, he moved toward its rear. There it 



I92I] BOY HUNTERS 

narrowed down to a single trail, over which moved 
an unbroken column marching both ways at 
once. Those that retreated from the battle were 
laden with the fruits of their labors: arms, legs, 
entire insects, and great caterpillars dragged by 
the jaws of twenty hard-working individuals; 
those that returned to the fray did so empty 
handed. 

Following the trail for two hundred yards, he 
came to their storehouse, an old stump, beneatli 
which the column, like a chain of buckets in a 
granary, entered laden and came out empty. 

So interested had the boy been in watching the 
manoeuvres of the ants that he had not noticed 
the passage of time. When he came to himself 
it was too late for more hunting, and he returned 
to camp. 

Both Jack and Fred were much interested in 
his story, though such armies were not new to 
either of them. 

"They 're one of the most interesting little 
beasts we have in the jungle," Jack declared. 
"The people down in the colony are glad to have 
them visit their homes. The ants act as house- 
cleaners; when they enter, every one gets out, 
and two hours later, when the ants have left, the 
people return to find the premises swept clean of 
all insect vermin like scorpions and tarantulas. 
They are a great nuisance, though, if they get on 
you, for they certainly can bite and sting." 

"Ho-ho-ho!" crowed Fred, joyously. "I 'd 
like to have seen Fat while he was sitting on that 
log. I bet he got up from there quicker than he 
ever did any thing in his life." 

"Guess I did make a little speed," agreed the 
individual referred to. "So would you, Skinny 
Shanks, if you 'd been in my place." 

"Perhaps 1 would, but just the same I 'd have 
enjoyed seeing you dancing around." 
"Well, it was n't much fun." 
"Haw-haw-haw! I can see you now, slapping 
and yelling and using language — Say, what 
language did you use?" 

Paul hurled an insect box at his chum and the 
conversation was closed. 

On the following morning Fred was mystified 
to see his friend entering the forest with a heavy 
army rifle over his shoulder. 

"What are you going to do with that cannon?" 
he demanded, as Paul marched past him. ■ 

"Oh, nothing. Just going to have a little 
practice." 

Ten minutes later the slim boy heard a shot, 
followed at intervals by others. What could Fat 
be shooting at? he wondered. Probably just 
blazing at a tree; he did n't see much fun in that. 

There came several more shots. What could 
that porpoise be doing? He was making an awful 



IN DEMERARA 635 

lot of noise about it, whatever it was. Again 
shots sounded. Fat evidently was n't having 
much success in what he aimed at or it would have 
been blown to pieces by this time. Well, he 
might just as well go out and show him how! 

Fred discovered the other seated on a rock 
beside the creek a short distance from camp. 
As he approached he saw Paul take careful aim 
at some huge hanging nests, which swung from a 
branch over the water, and fire. 

"What are you trying to do? Wreck those 
cassiques' nests?" 

"No; I 'm trying to cut one of them down with 
this rifle," the stout boy replied with a grin. "I 
think there are some eggs there from the fuss the 
birds are making." 

"Got any yet?" 

"No; those twigs arc pretty small things to hit." 

"Here, let me take a shot. Maybe I can hit 
one for you." 

"Haw, you can't do any better than I can." 

"What '11 you bet ? Give me the gun." 

Paul turned over the rifle and turned his face 
aside so that his chum could not see its gleeful 
expression. He looked first at the nests, then at 
something, half hidden by leaves, which hung 
from a low branch close to the water. Chuckling 
inwardly, he cried, "Go ahead and shoot, then!" 

Fred pointed the rifle and fired. The first: shot 
was a total miss. 

"What did I tell you" scoffed the other. 

"Wait till I get warmed up. There! How 
about that?" A splinter had flown from one 
of the twigs. "I '11 bet I get it this time." 

Sure enough, the next shot brought the long, 
grass-woven nest tumbling into the water, where 
a back eddy of current held it beneath the tree. 

"I '11 get it!" Paul volunteered, with pretend- 
ed eagerness. 

"No; I '11 do it. I shot it down." 

"All right then. But hurry up, before it drifts 
away." 

Fred left the rifle on the bank and jumped 
waist-deep into river. Slowly he made his way 
toward the nest, passing under the low branch as 
he advanced. Then, as he reached out an arm 
to seize it, he leaped'into the air with a howl! 

"Ouch! ouch ! ouch!" he yelled, slapping frantic- 
ally at his face and neck. "I 've fallen into a 
wasps' nest! Ou-ou-ouch!" and he dashed for 
shore. 

PauUwas rolling on the ground in a fit of 
laughter. 

Finding that his pursuers were increasing in 
numbers, Fred plunged head first under water 
and swam for the bank. The tiny marabunta 
wasps, which had been aroused by the repeated 
concussions, aided by a neat hole drilled in their 



636 



PETER TO THE RESCUE 



paper nest by the rifle before Fred arrived, were 
loath to give up the pursuit, and settled about his 
head every time it appeared above water. But 
at last, discouraged by their victim's prolonged 
immersions, they returned to their violated home. 

_ Fred dragged himself from the water and faced 
his unsympathetic companion. 

"What did — " he began, then clapped his hand 
to his chest. One of the marabuntas had got 
inside. In an instant the shirt went over his 
head and the wasp had met its end. 

Paul went into a second convulsion. 



(May 

"I don't see anything to laugh at!" the other 
exclaimed savagely. "Those fellows might have 
stung me to death." 

At this his chum laughed all the harder. The 
stings of the marabuntas were painful, but not 
very poisonous. When Paul regained control of 
himself, he gasped: 

"Say, what language did you use?" 

Fred looked at him in amazement, then a light 
dawned upon him. 

"Wh-wh-why you — !" 

But Paul had fled. 



(To be continued) 



PETER TO THE RESCUE 



By ARCHIBALD RUTLEDGE 



"Dry as powder," said Conrad Carter, crushing 
in his hand a bunch of leaves that he had just 
pulled from a bay-bush. "I never knew the time 
when this branch here was not hard to cross be- 
cause of the water. Now, even these bays are 
brittle ; and the moss is like tinder. I don't know 
what will happen to us if a 'coon or 'possum 
hunter ever drops a spark. This condition 
means," he added thoughtfully, "that I have to 
watch day and night; for if a forest fire ever 
crosses the road here, it will burn clear up to the 
house— and what will save the house? I must 
make a line of back-fire to-morrow — just as a 
safeguard." 

Before retiring that night, Carter walked out 
on the porch of his old plantation home. Calmly 
the moonlight of the mild midwinter of the South 
bathed the sleeping woods, the misty fields, and 
the solitary great oaks standing in spectral and 
majestic beauty before the house. It was a 
place Carter loved. His family had always lived 
there. It was not only his home, it was the home 
of his heart. And now as he walked down the 
steps and beyond the first patriarchal oak, turn- 
ing to survey the stately old mansion in the 
moonlight, he thought he had never seen it ap- 
pear so appealing in romantic and quiet beauty. 

"Nothing must happen to old Fairlawn," he 
said; "not while I live." 

_ Turning, he looked westward, where the dark 
pine forest stretched mysterious and interminable. 
A faint glow in the sky, under the great throbbing 
star of evening, he thought at first was the late- 
lingering light of the clear sunset. But as he 
observed it more carefully, he suddenly drew in 
his breath sharply. 



"The woods arc afire!" he exclaimed. "It 's 
far off, to be sure, perhaps six or seven miles, but 
it 's what I dreaded." 

Fortunate!}- there was no wind. With no 
moving air to fan it and with dew to discourage it, 
a fire in the forest burns slowly at night. Carter 
satisfied himself that there was no immediate 
danger. If the next wind would blow from any 
point but the west, the fire might burn clear away 
from his place. The morrow would tell. But he 
went to bed with the feeling of a soldier who 
senses the coming of a battle. And in his troubled 
dreams he saw flaring pines, flame-swept sedge- 
fields, and the black ruins of burned woods. 

Early in the morning Carter was abroad in the 
pine-lands. The sky was overcast and he hoped 
for rain. The glow that had tinged the night sky 
was no longer visible; but distant smoke-clouds 
could be seen rising above the trees. The wind 
seemed to have died down, but what little ail- 
stirred was blowing directly from the west. It 
was this fact that decided the course of the planta- 
tion owner. He would start a back-fire on the 
western edge of the great plantation road. It 
would be better to sacrifice the open pine-lands 
than the pasture adjoining, the house — and at the 
worst, the house itself. Confined to the pine- 
land, the fire would do no more damage that a 
season or two of growth could repair. But a 
fire sweeping the pasture could do harm irrepara- 
ble to undergrowth and trees, to neat stacks of 
hand-drawn cypress shingles, packed ready for 
shipment, to hundreds of cords of fire-wood, to 
fences, to stacks of forage, and to buildings. 

Back-firing the plantation road proved harder 
than Carter had expected. Vigorous as he was 



I92IJ 



PETER TO THE RESCUE 



637 



for his age, with the hardy endurance that comes 
only from a life of the field and the woods, this 
strenuous work wearied him. Keeping clear of the 
flames, watching that no sparks crossed the road, 
felling dead pines on the burnt side of the road 
so that, if the fire climbed them, flakes of burning 
bark would not be blown into the pasture, the 
smoke, all these were too much for one man to 
handle. But Carter could get no help that day. 
This he knew. The negroes from the settlement 
had gone to a big lodge-meeting far down the 
river. Only a few children remained in the row 
of negro cabins beyond Fairlawn house ; and these 
Carter did not like to enlist as helpers in work of 
this kind. He therefore continued it alone, and 
by noon he had accomplished enough to afford 
him a sense of security. One place, however, 
troubled him. This was Blacktongue Branch, 
a long, nearly dry watercourse choked with bays, 
myrtles, rosemary-pines, and gall-berries — a dense 
jungle of undergrowth that extended far into the 
pine-lands and continued into the pasture. 
Strangely enough, this thicket did not want to 
burn. Everything appeared dry enough, but 
there must have been dampness lurking in the 
shadows of the evergreens. Carter's fire burned 
here in a desultory way — not as it should have 
Hone. A fire with any momentum would sweep 
across the section he had burned. He therefore 
concentrated his efforts at: this place. It ap- 
peared to be the only spot at which the forest 
fire might cross the road. 

Coming out of the branch for a moment to 
avoid the dense smoke arising from burning 
sphagnum, Carter saw a dusky little urchin in the 
road, barefooted, clad in rags, hatless, but with 
a bright and smiling face and all the beguiling 
appeal of an eight-year-old youngster. 

"Why, hello, Peter!" exclaimed Carter; "how 
did you come to be here? Who sent you?" 

The tiny figure moved uneasily and with some 
embarrassment. But Peter's answer was to the 
point. 

"Nobody done send me," he said; "I done come 
for to help you." 

"Your pa 's down the river, is n't he?" And as 
Carter asked this question, there arose in his 
mind the picture of Peter's father, a negro of 
heroic build and a man of great usefulness on the 
plantation. He longed for his help at this time. 
Peter was hardly a substitute. 

"Why, Peter, I don't believe you can help me," 
Carter continued kindly, touched by the child's 
loyalty. 

"The big fire off yonder done broke out again," 
Peter said, pointing with a tiny hand across the 
pine-lands, sleeping in the winter sunshine. 

Carter looked quickly and saw that the child 



had spoken the truth. A perceptible wind was 
now blowing from the west. It brought the 
smell of smoke, and now and then it dropped a 
flake of gray ash. Dark clouds, that moved too 
swiftly for rain-clouds, rolled skyward. The fire 
was surely coming. The speed of its advance 
no man could measure, and none could withstand 
its fury if it ever struck a place like the Black- 
tongue Branch. Down such a stretch of dry 
greenery it would ramp and roar like a red hurri- 
cane. Even now, through the silence of noon, 
the rush of the hungry flames could be heard, and 
now and then a great pine, burned through at the 
foot, where the turpentine-boxer had left the 
tree vulnerable, could be heard falling heavily. 
Carter had not done his work a moment too soon. 
In a half-hour the fire might be upon him, gath- 
ering momentum as it came, and creating by its 
own furious advance a stormy wind. He had 
.seen such fires before, and of one thing concerning 
them he was sure : they were of the greatest danger 
to little children. Peter must return home as 
fast as he could. There was nothing he could do. 
He had been good to come, but a child cannot 
fight fire. Even Conrad Carter must do all his 
fighting now; later, the flames would have to have 
their own way. He feared lest Peter be endan- 
gered in some manner — overcome by the smoke, 
caught by a falling tree, lost in the chaos that 
would soon reign at the head of the Blacktongue 
Branch. Carter would stay as long as that was 
possible, but the little boy must go home at once. 

"Peter, I think this place here is going to burn 
out, but I will work with the back-fire as long as I 
can. You have helped me by coming, but you 
must run home now." 

The dusky lad hesitated. 

"You want me for to go?" he asked, disappoin- 
ted, but brightly willing to obey. 

"Yes, Peter, this branch will burn. You see 
there is no water in it to stop the fire." 

As Carter turned to reenter the darksome thicket 
that he was attempting to burn, he looked over 
his shoulder. Down the broad, white, sandy 
road little feet were flying. 

"I '11 be following pretty soon," said the planter, 
grimly. "And I must tell Peter's father about 
this — how he came to help me, and, when I sent 
him back, he went. That is what character 



It was nearly an hour later. 'With terrible 
rapidity the forest fire had swept down through 
the pine-lands. Darkness from black smoke- 
clouds was before it. The woods were filled with 
heat, the flashes of leaping flames, and the thud- 
ding of falling trees. A mile from the plantation 
road the great fire swept into the far end of the 



PETER TO THE RESCUE 



639 



Blacktongue. There, furiously rejoicing, it 
stormed through the wealth of tinder in the 
parched watercourse. Portentous columns of 
flames and smoke rose and twisted and turned 
and were blown fiercely toward the place where 
Carter, trying desperately to back-fire, heard only 
too well the roar of doom approaching. He did 
not leave his work to look; he kept fighting his 
way through the dense jungle, dropping fire from 
his torch of pitch-pine. He knew that the time 
left was short. Already the smoke was so dense 
and acrid that his breathing was stifled. But he 
would not leave. His back-fire was burning 
slowly, and as the breaths from the advancing 
tornado began to fan it, the flames leaped up 
more briskly. Grimed, weary, half-dazed by 
smoke, becoming doubtful as to his exact position 
in the branch in its relation to the road, he toiled 
on, faithful to what he saw as a trust — the saving 
of Fairlawn from the flames. 

Suddenly Carter became aware that he must 
get clear himself. He had done all he could to 
save the pasture and what lay beyond. Now 
he must save himself. He had not believed that a 
fire could sweep on with such appalling speed and 
ferocity. The air was dense with flying sparks 
and cinders and with rolling volumes of smoke. 
The roar of the flames was deafening. Fifty feet 
the red tongues shot hungrily skyward. To the 
westward all was panic and disaster, and the 
crest of the wild tidal wave of flame was now about 
to break upon the eastern end of the Blacktongue. 

Groping painfully amid the fumes, harried by 
vines and torn at by scraggy growths of the dense 
thicket, Carter fought his way outward. But his 
progress did not keep pace with the onrush of the 
flames. He had gone deep into the branch with 
his torch, but to get out was a different matter. 
He was bewildered, and his lungs began to labor 
pitifully. Fallen trees in the jungle obstructed 
his path. He climbed over them. From one, as 
he was getting across it, he fell heavily, and for a 
moment lay half stunned. He was losing his sense 
of direction. Though he fought his way on, he 
was dimly aware that his progress was counting for 
nothing. The world seemed afire. A thousand 
demons roared in his ears. Fierce heat and the 
rushing of flames and smoke encompassed him. 
Where was the road? He could see nothing but 
fire; he could hear nothing, smell nothing, taste 
nothing but fire! It swept about him! 

"I fought to keep this from Fairlawn," he cried 
out in his agony, "but it 's going to get me. I 'm 
lost! lost! lost!" 

Then, gripped in the red jaws of death, Conrad 
Carter suddenly heard some one speaking. 

"Water," said a childish voice, "I done bring 
dat water for you." 



Lying behind a wall of logs, where at last he had 
fallen and which for a moment gave him a little 
shelter, the dazed man opened his eyes to see 
above him little Peter, holding in his hand a small 
tin bucket of water. All round them the fire 
surged madly. 

"Pour the water on my head, Peter," Carter 
said unsteadily. 

The dusky lad did as he was bid. The white 
man struggled to his knees. 

"The way to the road — do you know it?" 

"This way," said Peter, simply, taking Carter's 
great bronzed hand in his tiny black fingers and 
pointing with the other hand through the shroud- 
ing flames. 

Carter gathered his strength together; then, 
still kneeling, he took the small lad in his great 
arms. 

"Hold tight and shut your eyes and mouth," 
he said. 

Then, bowing low, the man made a rush through 
the burning thicket at the point which the boy 
had indicated as the straight way to the road ! 

It was a fierce struggle, but a short one. With- 
in a few minutes Carter was out in the road. 
He beat out the sparks with which he and Peter 
had been showered, and soon they were almost 
clear of the smoke. There on an old pine log by 
the roadside they rested, — these two fire-fighters, — 
the owner of Fairlawn, a bronzed woodsman, now 
haggard and gaunt, and beside him the boy who 
had rescued him. And there they stayed until 
the ravaging flames, baffled by the back-firing in 
the Blacktongue, burned themselves out. Sparks, 
indeed, crossed the road; but no fire caught, and 
the pasture was saved. 

"Peter," said Carter, gravely, as they sat in 
close comradeship on the old log, "how did you 
find me in that place?" 

"I done see where you gone in," the child said 
simply, "but I done been lookin' for you a good 
while," he added, with unconscious pathos. 

"But the water," Carter went on, "the water 
that saved my life. How did you happen to bring 
it?" 

"Ain't you done say," Peter asked quaintly, 
"dat there ain't no water in de branch to put out 
de fire? If you don't hab no water, I must fetch 
vou water. I been tryin' for to help you," he 
added, as if justifying himself. 

Carter looked off across the smoking pine-lands; 
but something more than smoke made his eyes 
behave as they did. 

"?ou '11 never know, Peter, how much you 
helped me." 

Then to his own heart Carter said, "He will 
never know; but 'Greater love hath no man than 
this.'" 



'SNUFFER' 



By J. ALDEN LORING 

Field Naturalist with Smithsonian-Roosevelt Scientific Expedition to Africa 



"Snuffer' 4 always did one of two things when 
I picked him up: he snuffed and made a funny 
little noise in his throat that sounded as though 
his heart was thumping very hard against his 
ribs; or he rolled up like a big brown chestnut-bur. 
He cuddled up and looked like a bur because 
he was a hedgehog. Now don't contradict me 
and say you don't believe it because hedge- 
hogs don't roll up like chestnut-burs, for they do; 
that is to say, mine do. If yours don't, it is 
because you live in a section of the country where 
porcupines are erroneously called hedgehogs. So 
you see, according to our different ways of think- 
ing, we are both right, but I am "righter," be- 
cause there are no hedgehogs in America. 

Snuffer, my hedgehog, lived in Europe, where 
all hedgehogs live; that is, all but those that live 
in Asia or Africa. The particular part of Europe 
where he lived was in Sweden, near Upsala. 

He and I met one evening just as it was getting 
dark, which is the right time to meet hedgehogs. 
I had just finished my supper and would soon go 
to bed, and he had just waked up and was going 
out after his breakfast. So you see that while I 
was sleeping, he was awake; and while he was 
sleeping, I was awake. That 's why we never 
met in the daytime. 

Snuffer probably knew where he could get a 
meal of mice, bugs, and berries — in the grass, in 
the fields, or along some hedgerow. That must 
have been what he was after when we met. We 
were both somewhat surprised, and for a few 
seconds stood looking at each other. Then 
Snuffer turned and ran. But his little legs were 
so much shorter than mine that I overtook and 
picked him up; whereupon he rolled up into a 
ball, his prickers standing out like those on a 
chestnut-bur, as I have said. 

You see, Dame Nature had given him such 
short legs that no matter how fast he tried to 
work them, any animal could catch him. 

"Now see what you 've done!" said Snuffer 
to Dame Nature when he discovered his dilemma. 
"You 've ruined my prospects for a long life. I 've 
no means of protecting myself. The first hungry 
animal that comes along will make a meal of 
me." 

"Well, w-e-1-1!" replied Dame Nature; "so I 
have! How stupid of me! Usually I am very 
careful about that. Don't worry, though; I '11 
fix it all right. It is n't too late yet. I 've made 
so many sharp-toothed and sharp, long-clawed 

640 



animals, and so many swift-footed creatures that 
can either fight or flee from enemies, that this 
time I just think I will make you so you won't 
have to do either." 

"That sounds all right," said Snuffer, "but 
how are you going to do it?" 

Dame Nature did n't say a word. She began 
placing spines all over Snuffer's back, on the 
crown of his head and on his sides. When she 
was through, Snuffer looked like a military hair- 
brush lying on its back. 

"There you are!" she said, as she stepped back 
and looked him over. "Now when any animal 
comes after you, don't run. Just stop right still, 
roll up like a ball, and those spines will stick out 
in all directions and prick so hard that no one 
will dare to touch you." 

Well, sir! I gingerly picked him up, for his 
prickers were not so sharp unless I squeezed him, 
and I took care not to do that; the fact is, I 
handled him just as you would a chestnut-bur. 
I turned him around and he looked the same all 
over. Where had he gone? I could find no hole 
or sign of a hole where he had disappeared, yet 
when I first saw him, I was sure that he had four 
legs and a little head; but where were they now? 

For some time I held him very still in my hand, 
and then his prickers began to move just like the 
hair on a cat's back when she stands on her toes, 
arches her body, and begins to stretch, and you 
think she is going to "boil over." Then I saw a 
little hole begin to open up in the center of the 
bur and a little nose appeared, and then two little 
black eyes peeped out at me. Gradually the hole 
grew larger and larger until his whole face and a 
pair of big ears were exposed and a broad, stubby, 
whitish tail touched the end of his nose. There 
lie lay in my hand, blinking at me and ready to 
close up like a clam should I make a move. 

I took Snuffer to my room and placed him on 
the floor, where he lay for some time before he 
began to unroll again. I went about my busi- 
ness and finally again saw him peeking at me from 
the little opening. He watched me until he was 
thoroughly .satisfied that I meant him no harm, 
and then he uncurled entirely and ran about the 
room. 

I kept Snuffer in my room for about a week, 
and he proved to be a very funny and interesting 
little pel. It was not long before I discovered 
how he managed to coil up so tightly whenever 
he was scared. When he grew so tame that he 



'SNUFFER' 



641 



did not mind being handled, I put a finger under 
him and tickled his little "tummy." When he 
closed upon it, I could feel a broad band of strong 
muscles. It ran over his head and completely 
surrounded his body at a point where the spines 
on his back and side united with the hair on his 
under parts. This acted just like a puckering- 
string at the mouth of a bag. 

Whenever he wanted to become a chestnut- 
bur, he tucked his head under his chest, arched 
his back, pulled the muscles tight, and there he 
was — as snug as a bug in a rug. 

Snuffer grew so tame that I could call him 
from across the room by tapping on the floor with 
my fingers; and when he came up and found that 
I did not have any food for him, he showed his 
displeasure by sniffing and butting sidewise against 
my hand with his spines. I fed him bread, boiled 
potatoes, and mice. He did n't seem to care 
much for bread and potatoes, but he was very 
fond of mice. He ate slowly and kept gritting 
his teeth most of the time. I remember that it 
once took him sixteen and a half minutes to eat 
a half-grown mouse — maybe because he chewed 
his food very fine before swallowing it. 

From time to time he would shake himself, and 
his bristles would rattle against each other. 
Once I put him on the couch. He did n't seem 




Photograph by Elwiu R. Sanborn. Courtesy N. Y. Zoological Society 



SNUFFER AS AN EXAMPLE OF ARMED NEUTRALITY 1 

"Whenever he wanted to become a chestnut- 
bur, he tucked his head under his chest, arched 
his back, pulled his muscles tight, and there he 
was — as snug as a bug in a rug." 

to like that, for every time that he came to the 
side he would flatten out and peep over the edge 
as though he were afraid of falling. 

He was most active at night, and whenever I - 



awoke I could hear the patter, patter, patter of 
his feet on the carpet. He soon got so that he 
would not coil up when I handled him, but he 
always tried, by squatting close to the floor and 




Photograph by Elwiu K. Sanborn. Courtesy N. Y. Zoological Society 



SNUFFER IN AN INQUIRING MOOD 

"There he lay in my hand, blinking at me 
and ready to close up like a clam." 

sniffing, to prevent me from putting my hand 
under him. Sniffing seemed to be his way of 
saying don't. 

One night he in some manner managed to 
climb up on my bed, and awoke me by butting 
against my cheek and sniffing. He slept on his 
side, partly curled up like a dog. Whenever I 
shut the door or made any sudden noise, he would 
jump nervously, and at the first sign of real 
danger he threw up his spines and ducked his 
head, ready to pull the "pucker-string." Several 
times he bit my fingers, but it was never more 
than a hard pinch. 

One evening I knocked from the table and 
broke a glass candlestick, and after I had gone 
to bed I heard Snuffer rolling one of the pieces 
about the floor. At another time he tipped over 
on its side a bowl of drinking-water, and, putting 
his nose against the side, rolled it about the room 
for a few seconds. Then he ran away, but soon 
returned and repeated his play several times with 
evident delight. 

When I left Upsala I wanted to take my little 
pet with* me, but I finally decided to give him his 
liberty; so I carried him back to the spot where 
we first met and placed him on the ground. The 
last I saw of him, he was trudging off down a lane 
toward a dense thicket, carrying with him his load 
of spines. 



THE DRAGON'S SECRET 



By AUGUSTA HUIELL SEAMAN 

Author of "The Sapphire Signet," "The Slipper Point Mystery," etc., etc. 

SYNOPSIS OF PREVIOUS INSTALMENTS 
uns one seems to have none. Phyllis thinks there must be some mistake, but Leslie feels sure she is rieht 

« sss sus^^Mr.M^t^ tL - °» rasas 



CHAPTER XVIII 

RAGS TO THE RESCUE 

Phyllis whirled about. "What is the matter? 
Why do you say that?" she demanded in a fierce 
whisper. 

Eileen shrank back, evidently appalled by what 
she had unconsciously revealed. "I — I — did n't 
mean anything!" she stammered. 

"You certainly did!" Phyllis declared. "You 
said something about 'Ted.' Who is 'Ted,' and 
what is going on outside there?" 

"Oh, I don't know! — I 'm not — sure! I 'm 
dreadfully nervous, that 's all." 

"Look here!" cried Phyllis, with stern deter- 
mination, "I believe you know a great deal more 
than you will acknowledge. You 've said some- 
thing about 'Ted.' Now, I have a brother Ted, 
and I 've reason to think he has been mixed up 
with some of your affairs. I wish you would 
kindly explain it all. I think there 's some 
trouble — out there!" 

"Oh, I can't— I ought n't," Eileen moaned; 
when suddenly Leslie, who had glanced again out 
of the window, uttered a half-suppressed cry: 



"Oh, there is something wrong! They 're — 
they 're struggling together— for something!" 

Both of the other girls rushed to the window 
and peered out over her shoulder. There was 
indeed something decidedly exciting going on. 
The two figures who had been circling about the 
old log, watching each other like a couple of wild 
animals, were now wrestling together in a fierce 
encounter. How it had come about, the girls 
did not know, as none of them had been looking 
out when it began. But it was plainly a struggle 
for the possession of something that one of them 
had clutched tightly in his hand. Vaguely they 
could see it, dangling about, as the contest went 
on. And each, in her secret heart, knew it to 
be the burlap bag — and its contents! 

"Eileen!" cried Phyllis, turning sharply upon 
the other girl, "is one of those two — my brother 
Ted? Answer me — truthfully." 

"Yes — oh, yes!" panted Eileen. 

"And is he in — danger?" persisted Phyllis. 

"Oh — I 'm afraid so!" 

"Then I 'm going out to help him!" declared 
Phyllis, courageously. "Come, Leslie — and brine 
Rags!" 



642 



THE DRAGON'S SECRET 



643 



Leslie never afterward knew how it happened 
— that she, a naturally timid person, should have 
walked out of that house, unhesitatingly and 
unquestioningly, to do battle with some unknown 
enemy in the storm and the dark. If she had 
had any time to think about it, she might have 
faltered. But Phyllis gave her no time. With 
Rags at their heels, they snatched up some wraps 
and all suddenly burst out of the front door onto 
the veranda, Phyllis having stopped only long 
enough to take up her electric torch from the 
living-room table. She switched this on in the 
darkness, and guided by its light, they plunged 
into the storm. 

The force of the wind almost took their breath 
away. And as they plowed along, Leslie was 
horrified to notice that the tide had crept al- 
most up to the level of the old log and was within 
sixty feet of the bungalow. "Oh, what shall we 
do if it comes much higher!" she moaned to her- 
self. But from that moment on, she had little 
time for such considerations. 

Phyllis had plunged ahead with the light, and 
the two other girls followed her in the shadow. 
Leslie was somewhat hampered in her advance, as 
she was holding Rags by his collar and he strongly 
objected to the restraint. But she dared not let 
him loose just then. 

Suddenly they were plunged in utter darkness. 
Phyllis's torch had given out! The two others, 
reaching her side at that instant, heard her gasp, 
"Oh, dreadful! Can anything be the matter 
with this battery?" But after a moment's ma- 
nipulation the light flashed on again. It was in 
this instant that they saw the face of Ted, lying 
on the ground and staring up at them while his 
assailant held him firmly pinned beneath him in 
an iron grip. 

"Help!" shrieked Ted, above the roar of the 
wind. "Let Rags loose!" 

They needed no other signal. Leslie released 
her hold on the impatient animal, and with a 
snarl that was almost unnerving, he darted, 
straight as an arrow, for Ted's assailant. 

The girls never knew the whole history of that 
encounter. They only realized that Ted finally 
emerged from a whirling medley of legs and arms, 
limping, but triumphant, and strove to loosen 
the dog's grip on a man who was begging to be 
released. 

"That '11 do, Rags, old boy! You 've done the 
trick! Good old fellow! Now you can let go!" 
he shouted at the dog, trying to persuade him to 
loosen his hold. But Rags was obdurate. He 
could see no point in giving up the struggle at 
this interesting juncture. 

"Call him off!" Ted shouted to the girls. "I 
can't make him let go!" 



"Is it safe?" cried Phyllis, in answer. 

"We '11 have to take a chance!" he answered. 
"He 's half killing this fellow!" 

With beating heart, Leslie came into the range 
of the light, grasped Rags by the collar and pulled 
at him with all her might. "Come Rags! Let 
go! It 's all right!" 

The dog gave way reluctantly. And when he 
had at length loosed his terrible grip and was 
safely in Leslie's custody, the man scrambled to 
his feet, rose, held on to his arm with his other 
hand, and groaned. 

And, despite his disheveled condition and his 
drenched appearance, in the glare of the electric 
torch the girls recognized him, with a start of 
amazement. It was the fisherman of the after- 
noon — the man with the former limp ! 

He turned immediately on Ted with an angry, 
impatient gesture. "Well, the other fellow got it 
— after all! I don't know what business you 
had in this concern, but you spoiled the trick for 
me — and did n't do yourself any good! And if 
that dog gives me hydrophobia, I '11 sue the whole 
outfit of you ! He beat it off in that direction — 
the other fellow. I saw that much. I can't lose 
any time, though what I need is a doctor." 

And with another angry snort, he disappeared 
into the darkness and the hurricane! 

CHAPTER XIX 

EILEEN EXPLAINS 

It was an amazed, bewildered, and sheepish group 
that faced each other in the light of the electric 
torch after the departure of the unknown man. 
Phyllis was the first to recover self-possession. 

"Well, we might as well go indoors," she re- 
marked, in her decided way. "There 's evidently 
nothing to be gained by staying out here in the 
storm!" 

The others, still too benumbed in mind to 
have any initiative of their own, followed her 
obediently. Only when they were at the door 
did Leslie arouse to the immediate urgencies. 

"Do please be very quiet and not wake Aunt 
Marcia!" she begged. "I 'm afraid the effect 
on her would be very bad if she were to realize 
all that has happened here." 

They entered the bungalow on tiptoe, removed 
their drenched wraps, and sank down in the 
nearest chairs by the dying fire. 

"And now," remarked Phyllis, constituting 
herself spokesman, as she threw on a fresh log 
and some smaller sticks, "we 'd be awfully obliged 
to you, Ted and Eileen, if you '11 kindly explain 
what this mystery is all about!" 

"I don't see why under the sun you had to come 
butting into it!" muttered Ted, resentfully, 



644 



THE DRAGON'S SECRET 



nursing some bruises he had sustained in the 
recent fray. 

"Please remember," retorted Phyllis, "that if 
I had n't 'come butting into it,'— and Leslie and 




"IN THE GLARE OF THE ELECTRIC TORCH THE GIRLS RECOGNIZED HIM 

Rags,— you 'd probably be very much the worse 
for wear at this moment!" 

"That 's so! Forgive me, old girl ! You did do 
a fine piece of work — all of you. I 'm just sore 
because the thing turned out so— badly. But 
what I really meant was that I can't see how you 
got mixed up in it at all — from the very beginning, 
I mean." 



[May 

"That 's precisely what we think about you!" 
laughed Phyllis. "We 've felt all along as if it 
were our affair and that you were interfering. So 
I think we 'd better have explanations all around !" 

"Well, as a matter of 
fact, it 's Eileen's affair, 
most of all, so I think 
she 'd better do her ex- 
plaining first," Ted of- 
fered as a solution of the 
tangle. 

They all looked toward 
Eileen, sitting cowered 
over the fire, and she an- 
swered their look with a 
startled gaze. 

"I — I don't know 
whether I ought!" she 
faltered, turning to Ted. 
"Do you think I ought?" 

"I guess you 'd bet- 
ter!" he decided. "It 's 
got to a point where these 
folks seem to have some 
inside information of 
their own that perhaps 
might be valuable to you. 
At any rate, there '11 
be no harm done by it, 
I can vouch for that. So 
— just fire away!" 

Thus adjured, Eileen 
drew a long breath and 
said, hesitantly: 

"I — I really don't 
know just where to be- 
gin. A lot of it is just as 
much a mystery to me as 
it is to you. I think you 
all have heard that I 
have a grandfather who 
is very ill, in a hospital 
over in Branchville. He 
is the Honorable Arthur 
Ramsay, of Norwich, 
England. He has been 
for many years a traveler 
and explorer in China 
and India and Tibet. 
Early this year he had a 
severe attack of Indian fever and could not seem to 
recuperate, so he started for England, coming by 
way of the Pacific and America. When he got to 
the Atlantic coast, this last summer, some one 
recommended that he should try staying a few 
weeks at this beach; so he took a bungalow and 
spent part of the summer and autumn here, and 



thought he was much benefited." 



1921] 



THE DRAGON'S SECRET 



645 



"Do excuse me for interrupting!" exclaimed 
Phyllis; "but was the bungalow he rented Cur- 
lew's Nest?" 

"Why, yes," hesitated Eileen, with a startled 
glance at her, "it — it was." 

"Then, do you mind telling me how it was that 
the name was so different?" persisted Phyllis. 
"Mrs. Danforth understood that she rented it to 
a Mr. Horatio Gaines." 

"Oh, it was Grandfather's idea not to take 
it in his own name, because, you see, he 's 
a rather well-known person in England and even 
over here, and he needed a complete rest, with no 
danger of having to be interviewed or called upon 
or anything like that. So he had his man, Geof- 
frey Horatio Gaines, hire the place and transact 
all the business here in his name. It saved Grand- 
father a lot of trouble, for Geoffrey simply took 
charge of everything; and as Grandfather never 
went among people here, no one was the wiser. 

"After he left the cottage, he expected to go to 
New York and remain there till he sailed for 
home. And he did go there for a few days, but 
his health at once grew worse, so he returned to 
the beach. Of course, the bungalow was closed 
by that time, so he took rooms at the hotel, far- 
ther along. It was there that I joined him. I 
had come over here with friends of Mother's, 
earlier in the summer, and had been visiting at 
their summer camp in the Adirondacks until I 
should join Grandfather and return to England 
with him. 

"I had n't been with him more than two or 
three days when I realized that something had 
gone awfully wrong, somehow or other. Grand- 
father was worried and upset about something, 
and he began to watch his mail and be anxious 
to avoid meeting any one. He could n't or 
would n't explain things to me, but had long inter- 
views with his man, Geoffrey, who has been with 
him for years and years and whom he trusts 
completely. 

"At last, one awfully stormy night, about two 
weeks ago, Geoffrey disappeared, and has never 
been seen or heard of since. We can't imagine 
what has become of him. And the next day 
Grandfather was so worried about him and the 
other troubles, that a cold he had ran into a severe 
attack of pneumonia. Of course, it was n't 
feasible for him to remain at the hotel, especially 
as it was soon to close, so he had himself taken to 
the nearest good hospital, which happened to be 
this one at Branchville. Since he did n't have 
Geoffrey to wait on him, he wanted to be where 
he could have the best attention and nursing, and 
as I could run his car, which Geoffrey had always 
done, I could easily get there to see him. Then, 
as you probably know, the hotel closed for the 



season, and the manager very kindly found me a 
place to stay — with Aunt Sally Blake — in the 
village. She has been, very good and kind to me, 
but I expect I 've worried her a lot, not because I 
did n't care, but because I could n't help it and I 
could n't tell her about — things! 

"But, oh! I have been so troubled — so fairly 
desperate, at times! You cannot even guess the 
awful burden I 've had to bear — and all alone, — 
at least till I came, quite by accident, to know 
your brother Ted. He has helped me so much — 
but that is another part of the story ! 

"One night Grandfather's fever was very high 
and he was delirious. I be'gged his nurse to let 
me sit with him awhile, and I heard him con- 
stantly muttering about the bungalow, and Geof- 
frey hiding something there, and it being safe at 
Curlew's Nest, and a lot more half-incoherent 
remarks of that kind. Next morning he was a 
little better and in his right mind again, so I 
asked him what he had meant by the things he 
had talked about the night before. And then he 
said: 

"Eileen, I '11 have to trust you with some of the 
secret, I believe, since you 've overheard what 
you have. Perhaps you may even be able to 
help, and of course I can trust you to keep your 
own counsel — absolutely. There 's been a very 
mysterious mix-up here, and it involves far more 
than you may imagine. In fact, it might even 
become an affair of international moment — if 
something is not found, and quickly too. The 
gist of the matter is this: while I was in China 
last year, I had some informal correspondence 
with an official very high in government circles 
there, concerning his attitude in regard to the 
province of Shantung. As he was inclined to be 
very friendly toward me at the time, he was just 
a little expansive and indiscreet (I think those 
were Grandfather's words) in regard to his 
Government's plans. Later, I think, he regretted 
this, and made some half-joking overtures to have 
his letters returned. But I pretended not to 
understand him and the matter was dropped. 
As a matter of fact, I thought them too suggestive 
and important to my own Government to part 
with them ! 

"It is these letters that are the heart of the 
whole trouble," Grandfather says. "He heard 
nothing more about them till he came to stay at 
the hotel here. Then he received a very threaten- 
ing letter, declaring that if this packet was not 
returned to the writer, serious consequences 
would result. It did n't say what consequences, 
but Grandfather suspected they might even go as 
far as an attempt on his life. But he was deter- 
mined not to give up the letters. You see, they 
concerned a matter that might involve his own 



646 



THE DRAGON'S SECRET 



country with China, and he felt they should be 
delivered to his own Government. Besides that, 
he is just stubborn enough not to be bullied into 
anything by threats. 

"His man Geoffrey tried to persuade him to 
put the letters in a safe-deposit vault in New 
York, but Grandfather says he is old-fashioned in 
some things and does n't trust even to safe-de- 
posit boxes — says he prefers to keep things he 
values in his own possession. He had the letters 
in a queer little bronze box that was given him, 
years ago, by the late Empress Dowager of China! 
It had a secret lock that was quite impossible to 
open unless one knew the trick. He carried this 
in his pocket, and slept with it under his pillow 
at night, and felt perfectly safe about it." 

Here Eileen paused a moment for breath, and 
the two other girls glanced at each other guiltily, 
but they said nothing. Then Eileen went on: 

"One night, just after I came, there was an 
attempt to rob him at the hotel. The attempt 
failed because Geoffrey happened to be awake and 
discovered some one prowling about Grandfather's 
sitting-room. Whoever it was escaped through 
the window without even his face being seen, and 
there was no trace of him later. Grandfather 
made Geoffrey keep the thing quiet and not report 
it to the hotel, because he did n't want any 
publicity about the matter. But he decided then 
that it would be safer to have the thing hidden 
somewhere for a time— in some place where no 
one would dream of hunting for it. And it struck 
him that down at the bungalow where he had 
spent those quiet weeks, and which he supposed 
was all shut up and deserted, would be as unlikely 
a spot as any to be suspected of hiding such a 
thing. He supposed that the one next door— 
this one— was closed also, or I do not think he 
would have considered that hiding-place. 

"So the next night, which happened to be one 
when there was a very hard storm, he sent 
Geoffrey down to the bungalow with the little 
box containing the letters. He did not wish him 
to take the car, as it might be too conspicuous, 
but^had him go on foot. Geoffrey had found out, 
during the summer, that one could get into that 
place through a door at the side by working at 
the hook through the crack with a knife-blade, 
and he intended to get into the cottage and con- 
ceal the box in some out-of-the-way hiding-place 
there. 

"But here is where the mystery begins. Geof- 
frey set off that night, but has never been seen or 
heard of since. What has happened to him, we 
cannot imagine, unless he was caught and made 
a prisoner by some one concerned in getting those 
letters. If he had been killed, we would surely 
know it. Yet if he were alive, it seems as if we 



[May 



should have heard from him, somehow. He was 
a most devoted and faithful and trustworthy soul, 
so we are sure that something must have hap- 
pened to him— that he is being detained some- 
where. Grandfather is quite certain that he is 
guarding the secret of that box, somehow, and 
that it would be best to wait till he comes back or 
sends us some word. 

"What Grandfather asked me to do was to run 
out here in the car some day, and, if there was no 
one about, to scout around and see if I could dis- 
cover any clue to the mystery, without attracting 
attention. He supposed, of course, that the beach 
was by that time entirely deserted. I came 'out 
the very next day, but found to my disgust that 
the cottage next door was occupied— by you, as I 
now know! But I felt it would not be wise to 
be seen about here in the daytime, so, without 
saying anything to Grandfather (who would be 
awfully upset if he knew it), I determined to run 
out about ten o'clock that night and scout around 
when you people would probably be in bed. 

"And here is where Ted comes into it! I got 
here that night as I had planned, found no one 
about, and tried the experiment of getting into 
the side door, as Grandfather had explained. 
But I found it very difficult; in fact, quite im- 
possible — for me! And while I was fussing with 
it, I was suddenly startled by a low voice, right 
behind me, inquiring very politely what I was 
trying to do! It was Ted, here, who had been 
out for a stroll, and happening to catch a glimpse 
of me at this very peculiar occupation, and natu- 
rally thinking I was a burglar, had come up un- 
observed to find out about it! 

"You can just imagine what an awful position 
it was for me ! I did not know what to say or 
what to do. I knew that, legally, I had no busi- 
ness there, and if he were inclined to make a fuss 
about it, he could have me arrested. I literally 
almost went out of my mind at that moment. 
But I guess something must have made him feel 
that I was n't really a 'lady burglar' or anything 
of that sort, for he just said, very kindly, 'If you 
are in trouble, perhaps I can help you !' " 

"I did n't see how he could possibly help me 
unless he knew the whole story, and I thought I 
ought not tell any one that! But unless I did, I 
was certainly in a very terrible position. So I 
suddenly made up my mind it would have to be 
done, for something made me feel he was honor- 
able and trustworthy, and that the secret would 
be safe with him. What made me feel all the 
more sure was that he mentioned that he was 
staying up the beach at his father's bungalow, and 
had happened to be out for a walk and had seen 
me there. I know he said it to make me feel 
easier, and that everything was all right. 



THE DRAGON'S SECRET 



647 



"So I told him as much as I could of the story. 
And when he had heard it, he said: 'I happen to 
know all about opening that door, because I 
know the people very well who own the cottage. 
Perhaps you had better let me try.' I said I 'd 
be only too glad to, and he had the door unfas- 
tened in a moment. Then he told me to go in 



secret from every one, and said that he would 
make an even more thorough search over Cur- 
lew's Nest, if I wished, because he had much 
better opportunity to do so. Of course, I agreed 
to that and went on back to Aunt Sally's. 

"Two days later, Ted saw my car going along 
one of the back roads near the village, signaled to 




"EILEEN DREW A LONG BREATH AND SAID, 'I — I REALLY DON'T KNOW JUST WHERE TO BEGIN' 



and examine the place all I wished to and he 
would watch outside. If I needed any help, I 
could call and he would come in and do what he 
could for me. 

"Well, I went in and examined the whole place 
with my electric torch, but I could not discover a 
single thing except that one of the bricks in the 
fireplace had been partly loosened and a broken 
knife-blade was in the corner of the chimney-place. 
It was the only thing I could see to show that 
possibly Geoffrey had been there. I thought the 
knife-blade looked like one I had seen him use. 

"But as I did n't see a sign of the bronze box, 
I knew it was useless to stay any longer, so I 
came out. Ted fastened the door again, went 
with me to the car, which I had left down the 
road, and offered to give me any further help he 
could, at any time. He promised to keep the 



me, and told me that, the day before, he had 
caught you girls coming out of Curlew's Nest and 
that you acted rather guilty and refused to 
explain what you had been in there for. He told 
me that you might possibly suspect something, 
and to steer clear of you if we should happen to 
encounter each other, as it is always likely that 
people will, in this town. He described what you 
both looked like, so that I could n't fail to know 
you. 

"And, sure'enough, I met you both that very 
morning, in Mrs. Selby's little store, and I 
expect you think I acted in a perfectly abominable 
manner. I just hated to do it, for I liked the looks 
of you both, but I felt I must take no chances. 
Ted also told me that he had been in Curlew's 
Nest the night before and had gone over the place 
very carefully once more, but had found nothing 



648 



THE DRAGON'S SECRET 



except a string of beads that had been torn from 
the fringe of my girdle that other' night, and had 
been lying on the floor. I remember that the 
girdle caught when I was looking under one of 
the bureaus. He also gave me the broken pen- 
knife-blade to keep, as he said it was best to 
leave nothing around there that any one else 
could discover and use as a clue. 

"A day or two later I met you, Phyllis, at Aunt 
Sally's and she would insist on introducing us, 
though I could see you were no more anxious to 
make the acquaintance, after the way I 'd acted, 
than I was. But I encountered Ted again that 
afternoon, and he said he had hunted me up to 
tell me he had news and also a plan that he wanted 
to suggest. He said he had noticed, during the 
last two or three days, a strange man who seemed 
to haunt the beach, just a short way off and out 
of sight of the two bungalows. The man seemed 
to be a very ardent fisherman,— and an expert 
one, too,— but Ted had noticed that he kept a 
very sharp lookout toward the bungalows when 
he thought no one was around to see. He sus- 
pected that perhaps this man had something to do 
with the mystery. 

"The plan he suggested was that I get acquain- 
ted with you girls, after all, in some way that 
seemed the most natural, but without letting you 
know that I was also acquainted with him. And 
when I had done so, I had better offer to take you 
all out for a long drive in the car and keep you 
away a pod while, and give him a chance to see 
what this man was up to — if anything. 

"The getting acquainted was easy, and you all 
know how I managed that— and also the ride, a 
day or two later. When I was returning from 
the ride that night, at dusk, Ted signaled me from 
the bushes near Curlew's nest, jumped into the 
car, and told me what had happened in the 
afternoon. He had gone off to the village first, 
then hurried back, slipped up here by way of the 
creek, and hidden himself in a clump of rushes 
across the road. Just as he had suspected, he 
saw his suspicious fisherman sneak up here after 
a while, scout around the outside of the bungalow, 
disappear into it for a time, by the side door, 
come out, apparently empty-handed, stare at the 
outside again for a long time, and then at your 
bungalow, and finally disappear. But that was 
not all. 

"He waited where he was a few minutes, think- 
ing possibly the man might come back, and he 
was just about to come out, when along came an 
automobile with two men in it, which stopped 
directly in front of Curlew's Nest. He could not 



see their faces, for they had slouch hats pulled 
far down on their heads. They got out and walked 
about a bit, evidently to see if any one was 
around. Then, thinking themselves alone, they 
hurried up to the bungalow, worked at the side 
door, and finally got in. Shortly after, they came 
out again and walked down to the beach, where 
he could not see them. Then they came back, 
got into the car, and drove off. 

"By that time it was growing so late that he 
concluded he would stay where he was and wait 
for me to come back, which he did. Before he 
left me, we had a slight breakdown, and in help- 
ing me fix it, he hurt his hand. But that same 
night, long after midnight, he got into Curlew's 
Nest again to see if he could find out what had 
happened, and he found a very strange message 
left on the table— a type-written warning to the 
one who had taken the article (as it was called!) 
from its hiding-place to return it ; and underneath, 
a printed note in pencil saying it would be re- 
turned. He thought probably the first man had 
left the typewritten part, and the other two had 
printed the answer underneath. That was all 
he could make of it. 

( " It: was all very mysterious, but while we could 
n't make much out of it, at least it showed that 
something concerning the affair was going on and 
that the place should be closely watched. Ted 
volunteered to keep this watch. Meanwhile, 
Grandfather had had a very bad turn and I was 
with him constantly. He was terribly depressed 
over the whole affair. Even his doctor, who 
knows nothing about this, said he was evidently 
worrying about something; and if the cause of 
worry were not removed, he doubted the possi- 
bility of recovery. To-night I stayed with him 
later than usual, and, in returning, actually did 
lose my way in the storm. But when I at last 
discovered where I was, I knew that it was not 
far from here and could not resist the temptation 
to come over and see if anything was happening. 
I found Ted also scouting around, and suddenly 
we realized that some one else was on the ground 
too, though we could not tell who, in the darkness 
and rain. But Ted thought it very dangerous 
for me to be out there, so he made me come in 
here, as I did. And I need not tell you what 
happened after that!" 

Eileen ceased speaking, and Phyllis had just 
opened her lips to say something when there was 
a knock at the door. All four jumped nervously, 
but Ted got up and went to open it. 

To their immense alarm, the opened door 
revealed the figure of— "the man with the limp!" 



(To be concluded) 



THE ROGUE'S BARGAINS— A HINDU STORY 



By W. NORMAN BROWN 



There was once a rogue who had somehow or 
other secured a jar full of money and jewels worth 
a hundred thousand rupees. Determined to 
increase his wealth, he made public announcement 
that if any one would tell him something he did 
not already know, he would give that person the 
jar with its contents; but any one who tried to 
win the jar, and failed, would have to pay him a 
penalty of a hundred rupees. 

Many people tried to win the prize, but no 
matter how strange the things they told the rogue, 
he would always say, "Yes, I knew that long ago !" 
And then he would claim the penalty. Thus he 
grew richer every day. 

However, a clever young man once came to 
him, saying that he wished to try his luck for 
the jar. 

"You know my terms?" asked the rogue. 

"I do," answered the young man, "and I 
accept them." 

"Very well, then," said the rogue. "What 
have you to tell me which you think I do not 
know?" 

"Only this," replied the young man, who had 
taken care to bring a number of witnesses with 



him, "that your father borrowed this jar full of 
money and jewels from my father and never 
returned it. Now that my father is dead and I 
am his heir, it rightfully belongs to me." 

"Oh!" began the rogue with his usual answer, 
"I knew — " Then he halted, for he suddenly saw 
that if he said he had known this for a long time, 
he would thus admit the debt and would conse- 
quently be compelled to give up the jar to the 
young man. 

"Why," he started in again, "1 never heard — " 
Then he stopped a second time, for he realized 
that, if he acknowledged he had never before 
heard of this, he would be forced by his agreement 
to surrender the jar. 

By this time the witnesses saw that the rascal 
had at last been caught, and with one accord they 
shouted out: 

"Give up the jar! Give up the jar!" 

He hesitated; whereupon they seized it and 
handed it to the young man. Then they drove 
the rogue out of town. 

But the young man who had won the jar by 
his cleverness lived in great ease and comfort all 
the rest of his life. 




1. "I WISH DIS WUZ N'T SO HARD TER LEARN" 



3. "DADDY DONE TOLE ME EF I WAN' TER LEARN, 
I MUS' USE MA HAID" 




2. "DAR I GO FO' DE FO'FE TIME!" 



4. AN' I JES' RECKON DADDY 'S RIGHT, THES DE 
WAY HE ALLUZ IS!" 



649 




THE WATCH TOWER 

A Review of Current Events 
By EDWARD N. TEALL 



THE INAUGURAL ADDRESS 



It would be foolish to offer you, in May, an ac- 
count of President Harding's inauguration in 
March. But it is not too late for a review of our 
new President's inaugural address. If you think 
it is, submit yourself to this fair test: before you 
read another word of this article, try to write 
down on paper as many of the "points" of the 
address as you can remember. If you cannot 
pass the test to your own satisfaction, it will be 
worth while to read this "piece." If you can 
pass the test, it will be fun to criticize The Watch 
Tower. 

The inaugural address of a new President of 
the United States of America ought to be strong 
and dignified, clear and simple, and packed with 
ideas for the American people to think about 
for quite a while. President Harding's address 
"filled the bill." 

America, he said, had shared the world's sor- 
row; but "we contemplate our Republic un- 
shaken, and hold our civilization secure." Law 
and liberty still rule in America. "In the begin- 
ning the Old World scoffed at our experiment; 
to-day our foundations of political and social 
belief stand unshaken, a precious inheritance to 
ourselves, an inspiring example of freedom and 
civilization to all mankind." 

Now, there are some folks who would scoff at 
this sort of talk; some, even, who would call it 
sloppy. But it is true talk; it can be proved. 
Some things happen in this country that make 
you wonder, but then other things happen that 
make you regret even a moment's wavering of 
your faith. But we must think hard, and work 
hard, to keep our inheritance clean and ourselves 
worthy of it. 

President Harding spoke about our relations 
with other countries. We want to be friendly, he 
said, and helpful; but we can "never subject our 

650 



decisions to any other than our own authority." 
That, of course, refers to our relation to the League 
of Nations. We are ready to associate with other 
nations in trying to keep peace in the world; we 
will be national, not international, in our conduct. 
"We shall give no people just cause to make war 
upon us. We hold no national prejudices, we 
entertain no spirit of revenge, we do not hate, we 
do not covet, we dream of no conquest, nor boast 
of armed prowess." 

We must practise thrift and economy, the 
President said. We must "charge off our losses 
and start afresh." We do not need a new system 
of government, but must get the best out of the 
old one. We must follow the period of destruc- 
tion with one of production. We must have 
industrial peace. To keep up the American 
standard of living, Mr. Harding said, we must 
have protective tariffs. 

And then the new President condensed the 
whole of his eloquent address into one single 
word, a word that every single one of us must 
make his motto: S-E-R-V-I-C-E. 

THE FLURRY ON THE ISTHMUS 

In 1914, Chief-Justice White, of the Supreme Court 
of the United States, arbitrating a boundary- line 
dispute between Panama and Costa Rica, gave a 
decision which is said, through an error, to have 
given Costa Rica more territory than she claimed. 
In March of this year the dispute between the two 
countries was renewed, and furnished the occasion 
for the first international action by our State 
Department under the new Administration. 

By the Treaty of 1903 with Panama, the United 
States undertook to guarantee the independence 
of that country. Relying on that guarantee, 
Panama has not kept up an army. When Mr. 
Hughes took office, Costa Rica had started a raid 
on Panama, and there had been some skirmishing. 



THE WATCH TOWER 



651 



Mr. Hughes sent a note to each of the two Gov- 
ernments involved, warning them that hostilities 
must be suspended until the case could be re- tried. 

The dispute was one in which the League of 
Nations Council would naturally be interested. 
As action by the League would involve our con- 
cern for the Monroe Doctrine, the situation 
seemed fairly well complicated. 

THOSE HYPHENS MUST GO! 

An American must be an American and nothing 
else. People who come here from other countries 
to become American citizens must not wear a 



thoughtful citizens, who are not willing to have 
America misrepresented to the world. 

In mid-March more than seventy organiza- 
tions devoted to the work of Americanization 
formed a National Council in which they will 
work together. Americanization means simply 
education in good citizenship. The American 
Legion is taking the lead in a manner worthy of 
the men who fought in France. 

An excellent practical suggestion was made by 
the new commissioner-general of immigration to 
the effect that land be provided for new-comers, 
to direct them away from crowded industrial cen- 
ters, where so much discontent has its beginning. 




Wide World Photos 



PRESIDENT HARDING AND HIS CABINET, INCLUDING VICE-PRESIDENT COOLIDGE 



hyphen. We do not want German-Americans, 
Irish-Americans, or any other kind of compound- 
Americans. A man who moves from Texas to 
Pennsylvania does not call himself a Texas- 
Pennsylvanian. You don't hear of Baptist- 
Presbyterians, or Yale-Princetonians, or Eighth- 
Grade-Boy Scouts. America welcomes all who 
come to her intending to be loyal citizens; but 
there must be no hyphens in their baggage. 

There was in New York, early in March, a 
great meeting at which the friends of Germany 
and Ireland showed their readiness to put Ger- 
man and Irish interests ahead of American. In 
answer to this, another and still greater meeting 
was held, at which thousands of Americans had 
the pleasure of showing their loyalty. And 
back of these thousands were millions of quiet, 



JAPAN'S FIRST CENSUS 

The first census of the Japanese Empire ever 
taken fixes the population at 77,005,112. Japan 
itself has 55,961,140; Korea, 17,284,207; For- 
mosa, 3,654,000, and Saghalien, 105,765. It is 
interesting to compare these figures, and the area 
of Japan, with the figures for, say, England, New 
York State, Texas or California. Japan's great 
problem is that of finding land for all her people. 

Tokio, the capital, has a population of 2,173,- 
162. Osaka has 1,252,972; Kobe, 608,268; 
Kioto, 591,305; Nagoya, 429,990. All these 
cities are larger than Yokohama, with 422,942. 
There are fourteen Japanese cities with a popu- 
lation of more than 100,000. There are about 
125,000 more men than women in Japan. 



652 



THE WATCH TOWER 



[May 



Japan used to be more comfortable in the old 
days of her isolation than she is now, as a modern 
civilized power. The growth of her industries 
has made great changes in the life of the people, 
and her principal problem is to find room for her 
growing population. The Japanese are hard 
workers, and when they start a colony, some one 
is sure to feel the spur of competition. 

YAP 

South of Japan, east of the Philippines, north of 
New Guinea and Australia, and far to the south- 
west from San Francisco, lies the little Island of 
Yap. If Yap were laid out neatly in an oblong, 
its area would fill only a space eight miles by ten. 




From the New York "Cilolie" 

THE ISLAND OF YAP, SHOWING ITS STRATEGIC 
POSITION 

Its bamboo, cocoa, and palm-groves, the fishing 
in the surrounding waters, and even the pearl- 
oyster beds near by are small matters, except to 
the less than 10,000 Malayans who live on Yap. 
And yet this little island has been a storm-center 
of international politics! 

Yap is a cable station. It is the nerve-center 
of the Western Pacific, communicating by cable 
and radio with Honolulu, San Francisco, Tokio, 
Shanghai, Hong-Kong, Manila, and Port Dar- 
win. This part of the Pacific was formerly under 
Spanish control, but after the United States ac- 
quired Guam, Germany bought the neighboring 
islands. A very important part of the great 
system of international communication passes 
through Guam and Yap. If the two little islands 
were to be sunk by an earthquake to-day, 
the Eastern and Western worlds would lose 



a tremendously valuable means of keeping in 
touch. 

In the World War in Defense of Civilization, 
Japan took Kiao-chau and the Pacific islands 
from the Germans and occupied Yap, taking con- 
trol of its cable station. The Peace Treaty gave 
the island into the control of the Allies. In 
May, 1 919, the Peace Conference gave Japan a 
mandate in the islands, making her responsible 
for control of affairs in them, and in December of 
1920 the Council of the League of Nations con- 
firmed the mandate. 

Secretary of State Colby protested against 
Japanese control of the Island of Yap. The 
United States argued that the control of the cable 
station should be held over for settlement by the 
International Communications Conference, which 
met at Washington in March. But the League 
Council replied that the placing of the mandates 
was done by the Allied Council; that they had 
given Japan the mandate over the ex-German 
islands north of the equator, including Yap, and 
that the Council of the League could only con- 
firm this mandate and see that it was properly 
carried out. 

The United States did not want the island, but 
did want to control the cable station. But — 
Japan would not care about the island, particu- 
larly, except for the cable control that goes with 
it. So there came up the question of "inter- 
nationalizing" the island; and late in March, 
when this instalment of the Watch Tower was 
written, the problem looked as though it still 
might need a whole lot more of solving. 

OUR "UNKNOWN SOLDIER" 

Nothing in all the news that fills the daily papers 
compares in interest, it seems to me, with the 
report, published March 16, that the new Admin- 
istration had fixed next Armistice Day as the 
time for official national honors to The Unknown 
American Soldier, who will be buried at the 
National Cemetery at Arlington. It is said 
that there are nearly 2000 of our soldier dead 
whose bodies could not be identified. The nation 
can do no finer thing than to pay special honor 
to these men, who followed Old Glory to France, 
fought and died for America and Civilization, 
and could not even have their remains cared for 
•by the dear ones whom they left at home. 

America has always been defended by men who 
leave private life to learn soldiering when the 
Republic is in danger. Our good old regulars, 
the best soldiers in the world, are only typical of 
American manhood. Their splendid spirit is 
quickly caught up by their new comrades who 
respond when the call comes, and it means some- 



IQ2I] 



THE WATCH TOWER 



653 



1RST GAR of COP.h 

European relief 
PohiYcomiTmlk 

psftm cs^n't tttttiK jUactHiOH 



:::: S 



International 

THE FIRST CARLOAD OF THE 1.5,000,000 BUSHELS OF CORN GIVEN BY AMERICAN FARMERS FOR THE RELIEF 

OF EUROPE AND CHINA 



thing when we sing "The Yanks are coming." 
America's army in the Great War can never lack 
honor while America endures, a nation of free- 
men; but of all the hundreds of thousands who 
put on Uncle Sam's uniform, none, not even the 
men who were left alive but permanently dis- 
abled, can quite equal the appeal to our emotions 
made by the men who fell in France, unidentified 
- — the Unknown Dead. 

The ceremonies at Arlington next November 
will mark a great renewal, in America, of the 
Spirit of Nineteen-eighteen. 

RUSSIA 

Russian history is written in blood. From the 
days of Ivan the Terrible, Russia has lived through 
one Reign of Terror after another. The Bol- 
shevik chapter has been perhaps the most terrible 
of them all. 

In March, Russian fought Russian. At Petro- 
grad, in Moscow, and in the south the Soviet 
troops battled with rebels; and as usual, the rest 
of the world hardly knew what to make of it all. 
Russia has given the world a terrific object-lesson 
in the power of people to make themselves 
unhappy. 

The Soviet Government and the Government 
of Great Britain made a trade agreement. It is 
hard to see what there could be in such an agree- 



ment for Great Britain. Perhaps the British 
Government was really, as some critics asserted, 
only trying to satisfy discontented labor in Great 
Britain. At any rate, to us in America any kind 
of an agreement with the Government of Lenine 
and Trotzky seems like poor business. As Mr. 
Hoover says, commodities, not gold are the sup- 
port of commerce; and Russia is not producing. 

Russia signed a peace treaty with Poland, and 
a treaty with Turkey. Perhaps a great new 
power is forming about the Black Sea. 

IS THIS AN ENTANGLING ALLIANCE? 

China was hungry. America heard her call. 
The churches raised something like three million 
dollars for Chinese famine relief. Other agencies 
collected large sums. We have had drive after 
drive, but think of a land full of hungry people! 

Our picture shows a freight-car loaded with 
corn — the first of the fifteen million bushels 
promised by American farmers for the relief of 
Europe and China. 

The plea — and the answer! And an alliance 
which can hardly be unpleasantly "entangling." 

THE TURK AND THE GREEK 

On March 12, the London Conference, called to 
settle the claims of Greece and Turkey, came to a 
close. The Supreme Council of the Allies pre- 



654 



THE WATCH TOWER 



sented a plan for a commission to investigate the 
situation in Smyrna and Thrace. 

The Greek delegation, being called in to hear 
the decision, said that their National Assembly 
could not accept the arrangement without feeling 
that Greece had been called upon to surrender the. 
"rights" gained "by endless sacrifices made by 
the Greek nation in common with its great Allies." 
The Assembly would not agree to promise to 
submit to any decision without knowing just how 




Wide World Photos "~ " ' 

MUSTAPHA KEMAL PASHA, HEAD OF THE TURKISH 
NATIONALISTS 



it was to work out. The Greek representatives 
at the Conference, however, were gracious enough 
to say that they would forward to their Govern- 
ment any definite proposals the Conference might 
care to make. 

The Turks expressed their readiness to have 
the commission appointed. As to the other con- 
ditions of the treaty, they hoped that the Allies 
would provide for "the existence of a free and 
independent Turkey." The Allies gently in- 
formed the Greeks and the Turks that it would be 
wise not to insist on details, lest the Supreme 
Council be made to feel that stronger measures 
were required. 

The general opinion was that while the Near 
East still had a few problems left for future 
solution, a step forward had been taken, and the 
air cleared. And then — Greece and Turkey 
began fighting. 



THROUGH THE WATCH TOWER'S 
TELESCOPE 

The Interstate Commerce Commission reports 
that in 1920 it cost the railroads $93.59 out of 
every $100 they earned to keep the traffic moving. 
In 1919 the amount was $85.25. 

Mr. Denby, the new secretary of the navy, 
wants Uncle Sam to have the best navy in the 
world. He does not say "the biggest navy," you 
will notice, but "the best navy." We can be 
"fit to fight and trained to the minute" and still 
not go around looking for a fight. Disarmament 
can hardly come about until all the nations agree 
to undertake it together; and until that happens, 
it will be a good thing for us to keep in training. 

There will be, in J une, a conference of prime 
ministers of the Governments of the countries in 
the British Empire to discuss relations with 
Japan, naval policy, and British foreign policy. 

Andrew W. Mellon, the new secretary of the 
treasury, says: "The country's finances are 
sound, but the situation calls for the utmost 
economy." Nothing to be downhearted about 
in that! 

President Harding's secretary of war, Mr. 
Weeks, of Massachusetts, declared himself in 
favor of a single, central organization of the 
country's military forces, including the regular 
army, the national guard, and the reserves. 
Secretary Weeks made ex-Secretary Baker a 
Colonel in the Officers' Reserve Corps. 

Ex-Vice-President Marshall spoke at Cleve- 
land soon after his retirement from office. He 
said: "America is the hope of the world. Let us 
live our democracy. Let us make America 
really democratic." 

"Washington, March 9.— Secretary Davis 
reached the Labor Department to-day at 7:30 
o'clock, an hour ahead of the office force." 

Postmaster-General Hays promises to "hu- 
manize" his Department . 

As Secretary of Commerce, Mr. Hoover has 
tackled another war job, for the struggle for 
trade in the coming years will be a bitter one. 

The new secretary of agriculture, Henry C. Wal- 
lace, says: "The people must understand that 
our prosperity as a nation depends upon a pros- 
perous and wholesome agriculture." 



NATURE AND SCIENCE FOR YOUNG FOLK 



VENTURI ACCUMULATOR /\ '^"E— -— -J— 




AN AEROPLANE EQUIPPED WITH THE AVELINE STABILIZER. INSET: MECHANISM OF THE STABILIZER 

THAT CONTROLS THE AILERONS 



THE AUTOMATIC PILOT 

Of course, every boy and girl knows that it is far 
more difficult to drive an aeroplane than to drive 
a motor-car, not merely because you have two 
steering-gears or rudders to take care of, one for 
sidewise and the other for up-and-down travel, 
but also because there are rudders in the wings 
of the machine which have to be worked to tip or 
"bank" the machine when rounding a curve or to 
keep it on an even keel when a side gust of wind 
strikes it. 

It is hardly necessary to explain that when an 
aviator uses the word "rudder" he means only the 
vertical plane at the tail of his machine with 
which he steers sideways. The horizontal plane 
at the tail, with which he steers up and down, is 
the "elevator," and the rudders in the planes are 
the "ailerons." 

The driver of an automobile can see clearly the 
road he is traveling and so can avoid bumps. 
Once he is in high gear, with a fairly level road 
ahead, he has nothing to do but to tend the 
steering-wheel and "step on the gas." He does 



not need to bank his machine at curves. In some 
cases the road is already banked for him, so that 
he can take the curve at high speed. The aviator, 
however, has no road built for him; and traveling 
as he does at very high speeds, he must tip his 
machine to a steep angle to make a sharp turn, 
and even a gradual curve calls for some banking. 
He never knows what is ahead of him. He may 
suddenly drop into a "hole," which is really a 
downward current of air, or he may have a bump 
when he strikes a rising air-current. A freaky 
whim of the winds may suddenly take away the 
support from under one of the wings, and he will 
lurch and dip sharply on that side. 

The pilot is blind to all these pitfalls and must 
control his machine largely by the sense of feeling, 
and he also depends to a larger extent than is 
generally realized upon his view of the earth or 
of clouds beneath him. If he is enshrouded in 
fog or tries to sail through a heavy bank of clouds, 
he is quite likely to lose all sense of direction. 
He will not know whether he is banking or travel- 
ing on an even keel. Sometimes aviators have 



655 



656 NATURE AND SCIEN 

come out of a cloud, and found themselves dan- 
gerously close to the earth in an awkward posi- 
tion — a steep bank, a side-slip, or even in a 
nose-dive. In some cases where the clouds were 
very low, they have not had time to right them- 
selves before crashing to earth. 

Before flying can become really safe, some way 
must be found of keeping the machine on an even 
keel without depending upon the eyes and the 
sense of equilibrium of the pilot. There have 
been many efforts to invent a suitable "stabilizer," 
as such a device is called. 

The first stabilizers used a pendulum to show 
when the machine was level. If the airplane 
tipped, the pendulum would make an electric 
contact with the side that was down, and this 
would start electric motors which would set the 
ailerons to bring the machine back to level. 

But the trouble with a pendulum, even when 
it is so arranged that it will not get to swinging 
back and forth, is that centrifugal force will make 
it move out of the true vertical position when the 
machine turns or lurches. A more successful 
stabilizer is one that is operated by a gyroscope, 
in place of a pendulum, but a gyroscope is rather 
heavy for a flying-machine, and it is liable to 
cut up and perform capers of its own when the 
airplane is tossing about in gusty weather. 

A new stabilizer has just been invented by a 
Frenchman, M. Georges Aveline, which is very 
ingeniously worked out. Evidently it must be 
more than a freak invention, because the British 
Air Ministry is fitting twelve of its big bombing- 
machines with the Aveline stabilizer. With this 
automatic pilot installed, the aviator need have 
no worry at all. He can take his hands off the 
controls and let the machine run itself. All he 
has to do is to operate the rudder with his feet. 
The automatic pilot works the elevator and the 
ailerons. It takes care of "bumps" and "holes" 
and sees that the machine banks properly when 
turning. This is even simpler than running a 
motor-car, because one does not need to worrv 
about speed-gears when climbing and does not 
have to slow down for a curve. 

In our drawing, the artist has put the X-rays 
on the machine, so that we can look right through 
the walls of the fuselage and see one of the stabili- 
zers in the cockpit and also the compressed-air 
tank. This stabilizer runs across the cockpit 
and takes care of the ailerons. There is another 
stabilizer, not shown in the drawing, that runs 
lengthwise of the machine and takes care of the 
elevator. The X-ray effect enables us also to see 
one of the pumps for filling the air reservoir. 
This pump is connected to a "windmill" screw or 
propeller, which is driven by the rush of air when 
the airplane is under way. There are two of these 



I FOR YOUNG FOLK [May 

pumps, one at each side, located under the fuse- 
lage where they will get the full sweep of the wind. 

In the cockpit, on the dashboard, there is an 
indicator consisting of three small electric lamps. 
When the airplane is flying on an even keel these 
signal lamps are dark; but a tilt to port will light 
the left-hand one, and a tilt to starboard, the 
right-hand one, while the center lamp shows 
whether the machine is diving. 

The mechanism of the two stabilizers is very 
much the same. The one shown in the inset is 
that used for controlling the ailerons. The 
drawing is not a true picture of the mechanism, 
but a sort of diagram in which only the principal 
parts are shown, so as to make it easier to under- 
stand how it all works. 

To start with, there is a disk which has a circu- 
lar bore in it half filled with mercury. This cor- 
" responds to a pendulum; for as the airplane tilts 
to one side or the other, the mercury will try to 
keep its level, flowing out of the high side. At 
the bottom of the mercury tube, there is an elec- 
tric contact, A; and just above the normal level 
of the mercury, there are two more electric con- 
tacts, B and C. If the machine should tip 
toward the left, contact C would be submerged in 
the mercury and then things would begin to 
happen. 

Those who are sufficiently up on electricity to 
read a wiring diagram can trace out for themselves 
the electrical circuits. First, the port signal- 
lamp lights up, and then, through a relay, two 
electro-magnets on the left-hand side are ener- 
gized. One of these magnets closes an exhaust- 
valve, and the other opens an inlet-valve, letting 
compressed air into the left end of a cylinder at 
the bottom of the stabilizer. In this cylinder, 
there are two pistons connected by a bar or pis- 
ton-rod. On this rod there is a toothed rack 
which meshes with a toothed sector. When 
compressed air enters the left-hand end of the 
cylinder, the pistons are moved toward the right 
and the sector is turned on its axis in the direction 
of the arrow. Connected to this sector are the 
wires that run to the ailerons. This connection 
is at the back of the sector and so is not shown in 
the drawing, but it will be readily understood that 
the ailerons are tipped so as to bring the machine 
back to an even keel. 

As the machine rights itself, the contact, C, is 
carried out of the mercury, breaking the electric 
circuit, and the inlet-valve closes, while the ex- 
haust-valve opens. Then the pressure of the 
wind against the ailerons flattens them back to 
their normal position, carrying the pistons back 
to the position they started from. 

This seems very simple, but there is a complica- 
tion that has to be provided for. If the ailerons 



NATURE AND SCIENCE FOR YOUNG FOLK 



657 



were held in tilted position until the machine was 
on an even keel, they would make the aeroplane 
swing too far ; it would rock over to the other side, 
and the machine would roll back and forth more 
and more violently. To bring the aeroplane 
back without overshooting the mark, the electric 
circuit must be broken before the machine returns 
to the level position. This is provided for by 
securing a small sector on the large one. This 
small sector meshes with a set of gear-teeth on 
the mercury disk so that, as the pistons move 
toward the right, the disk turns in the direction 
of the arrow, carrying the contact, C, out of the 
mercury. 

Of course, if the machine should dip to the 
right, the valves on the right would be operated 
and the parts would all move as they did before, 
but in the opposite direction. 

So far, the mercury has been used just like a 
pendulum, and everything works out all right 
while the machine is traveling straight ahead. 
But now let us see what would happen if the 
machine started to make a turn, say to the right. 
First of all, the mercury would be thrown toward 
the left by centrifugal action — that is, it would 
surge up on the left side, submerging contact C. 
This would operate the ailerons to raise the left 
side of the machine and depress the right side. 
In other words, the airplane would be properly 
banked. But after getting into this position, the 
ailerons must be brought back to neutral position 
or they would keep on tilting the machine until it 
stood on edge. 

Here is where the real genius of the inventor 
shows itself. At the top of the mercury channel 
in the disk there is a dividing wall, and a tube 
runs from the left side of this wall to the right 
wing of the airplane and from the right side of 
this wall to the left wing. At the end of each 
tube, there is what is known as a "Venturi tube." 
This is a kind of suction device operated by the 
wind. The wind that flows through the left 
Venturi tube sucks the air out of the right-hand 
side of the mercury tube, and the right Venturi 
sucks air out of the left-hand side of the mercury 
tube. The stronger the wind, the greater the 
suction. Now, when making a turn to the right, 
the left wing must travel faster than the right 
wing, and so there must be more suction in the 
left Venturi. This produces a greater suction in 
the right-hand side of the mercury tube, which 
draws the mercury up on that side and down on 
the other, until the contact is broken at C and the 
ailerons are returned to neutral position. 

The mechanism is so arranged that the human 
pilot can throw out the automatic pilot instantly 
if anything goes wrong, or if he should wish to 
put his machine through special manceuvers. 



The weight of the automatic pilot is about 150 
pounds. In other words, it weighs as much as a 
human pilot. However, it is being built in 
lighter form for smaller machines. Even though 
it does weigh as much as an extra man, the extra 
load will not be begrudged so long as it insures 
perfect safety in flight. 

A. Russell Bond. 

THE "TALKING THREAD" 

The first phonograph records were wax cylinders 
that had to be handled very carefully and were 
very bulky. Then the disk record was invented, 
and it proved so rugged and handy that the 
cylinder record had to give way to it. But disk 




THE MACHINE THAT MAKES AND REPRODUCES 
THE "THREAD " RECORD 



records are fragile and quite liable to crack if 
dropped. 

As a substitute for the disk record, an inventor 
has recently brought out a "thread" record, which 
is so compact that a five-minute talk may be 
coiled in a watch case. The thread is made of a 
special composition, and on it the point of a 
recording needle cuts the record in the same way 
that the ordinary recording needle cuts its record 
on a disk or cylinder. Then the thread is run 
through the machine under a reproducing needle, 
and the thread gives back the sounds that have 
been recorded upon it. 

One thing that has to be guarded against is 
twist. If the thread turns over on its side, the 
reproducing needle will not bear on the record; 
and so care must be taken to run the thread 
through with the record side always uppermost. 



658 



NATURE AND SCIENCE FOR YOUNG FOLK 



(May 



Any ordinary thread will twist, because it is made 
up of twisted fibers; but the inventor calls this 
thread "structureless"— that is, it has no twisted 
fibers in it, and hence it can be wound up or reeled 
off without showing any tendency to twist. 

The advantages of this kind of a record are 
apparent. Instead of writing a letter to your 
friend, you may put your message on a thread 
and send it to him or her by mail. 

A. Russell Bond. 



THE STARS IN MAY 

The constellations whose acquaintance we will 
make this month are ones that will be found on 
or near the meridian between eight and nine 
o'clock in the evening during the first two weeks 
of May. In the course of the month these star- 
groups will gradually shift westward, their places 
near the meridian being taken at the same hour 
by other groups of stars now in the eastern sky. 

Ursa Major, the Great Bear, and Ursa Minor, 
the Lesser Bear, or, as they are more familiarly 
called, the Big Dipper and the Little Dipper, are 
the best known of all the constellations visible 
in northern latitudes. .They are called circum- 
polar constellations, which means "around-the- 
pole," and above forty degrees north latitude 
they never set, but can be seen at all hours of the 
night and at all times of the year. In winter 
evenings they lie below the pole and near the 
horizon, and so are usually hidden more or less 
from view by trees or buildings. It is during the 
evenings of late spring and summer that these 
two constellations are seen to the best advantage 
high in the sky above the pole. If you look due 
north at the time mentioned, you will find them. 

The two stars in the bowl of the Big Dipper, 
through which an arrow is drawn in the chart, 
are called the Pointers, because an imaginary line 
drawn through these two stars and continued a 
distance about equal to the length of the Big 
Dipper brings us to the star Polaris, or the North 
star, at the end of the handle of the Little Dipper, 
which is very close to the north pole of the heavens, 
the direction in which the earth's axis points. 
The pole lies on the line connecting the star at 
the bend in the handle of the Big Dipper with 
Polaris and is only one degree distant from the 
pole-star. 

The distance between the Pointers is five 
degrees of arc, and the distance from the more 
northerly of these two stars to Polaris is nearly 
thirty degrees. We may find it useful to remem- 
ber this in estimating distances between objects 
in the heavens. 

At the equator the pole-star lies in the horizon ; 
at the north pole of the earth it is in the zenith 



or directly over head. Its altitude or height 
above the horizon is always equal to the latitude 
of the place. As we travel northward from the 
equator toward the pole we see Polaris higher and 
higher in the sky. In New York the distance of 
Polaris from the horizon is forty degrees, which is 
the latitude of this city. 

The Pointers indicate the direction of true 
North, while the height of Polaris above the hori- 
zon gives us our latitude. 

These kindly stars direct us by night when we 
are uncertain of our bearings, whether we travel 
by land or sea or air. They are the friends and 
aids of navigators, explorers, and aviators, who 
often turn to them for guidance by night. 

The star at the bend in the handle of the Big 
Dipper, called Mizar, is of special interest. If you 
have good eyesight, you will see close to it a faint 
star. This is Alcor, which is the Arabic word for 
"The Test." The two stars are often called the 
Horse and the Rider. 

Mizar and Alcor form what is known as a wide 
double star. It is, in fact, the widest of all 
double stars. All stars are really suns, like ours, 
but many stars in the heavens that appear single 
to us are shown by the telescope to be double or 
even triple or multiple. They consist of two or 
more suns revolving about a common center, 
known as their center of gravity. 

Sometimes the suns are so close together that 
even the most powerful telescope will not separate 
them. Then a most wonderful little instrument, 
called the spectroscope, steps in and analyzes the 
light of the stars and shows which are double and 
which are single. A star shown to be double by 
the spectroscope, but not by the telescope, is 
called a spectroscopic double star. 

Mizar is of historic interest as being the first 
double star to be detected with the telescope. A 
' very small telescope will split Mizar up into two 
stars, and these two stars, or suns, are known to 
be only twenty-five million miles apart. The 
brighter of the two is a spectroscopic double 
besides, which means that it is really two suns 
instead of one, but the distance between the two 
is so small that even the telescope cannot separate 
them. About this system of three suns which we 
know as the star Mizar, the faint star Alcor 
revolves at a distance from them equal to sixteen 
thousand times the distance of the earth from the 
sun! 

Polaris also is a double star that can be easily 
' separated into two stars by means of a small 
telescope, and the brighter of the two has been 
shown by the spectroscope to be three suns in- 
stead of one. It is now known that there are 
many stars in the heavens which are made up 
of two or more suns close together. 



IQ2I] 



NATURE AND SCIENCE FOR YOUNG FOLK 



659 



To complete the outline of the Great Bear, it 
is necessary to include faint stars to the east, 
which form the head of the Bear, and other faint 
stars to the south, which form the feet, but these 
are all inconspicuous and of little general interest. 

If we follow the imaginary line drawn through 
the Pointers in a southerly direction about forty- 



The constellations are groups of stars in the 
background, against which we see the compara- 
tively near-by planets projected. The planets 
may appear to be in the constellations, but they 
are not of them. They gradually pass on to 
another part of the heavens as they journey 
around the sun; and if we watch the positions of 



£ s\ -* • 



T^StfS** Star; 



X* 

.•-•'-< .A* 



(£<9 W* r) W 





N 








s 



THE CONSTELLATIONS: LEO; URSA MAJOR AND URSA MINOR; CORVUS AND CRATER. TO USE THESE CHARTS, 
HOLD THEM IN A HORIZONTAL POSITION ABOVE THE EYES OR OVERHEAD, WITH N POINTING TO THE NORTH 



five degrees, we come to Leo, the Lion, one of the 
zodiacal constellations through which pass the 
sun, moon, and planets in their circuit of the 
heavens. 

At present this constellation is particularly 
conspicuous through the presence in it of two 
brilliant planets, Jupiter and Saturn, which we 
do not show on the chart of Leo since they are 
seen within the bounds of this constellation only 
temporarily and will pass out of it within a few 
months. 

Jupiter is the brightest object to be seen in the 
heavens at this time, far surpassing Saturn in 
brilliancy, as well as Regulus, the beautiful white 
star which marks the heart of Leo and the handle 
of the Sickle. This sickle-shaped group also 
outlines the head of the Lion. 

The two planets are at this time only about 
nine degrees apart and a few degrees south of the 
line that connects Regulus with Denebola, the 
star that is in the tail of Leo. 

Planets are dark bodies shining only by reflected 
light from our sun, while the stars are themselves 
suns, shining by their own light. Saturn and 
Jupiter appear brighter than the stars simply 
because they are, comparatively, so near to us. 
So much nearer are the planets than the stars 
that the light from them takes only a few 
minutes to reach us, while the light of the stars 
takes years. The stars are in reality moving 
rapidly through space, but they appear immov- 
able for centuries because their distance from the 
sun and his planets is so tremendously great. 



Jupiter and Saturn from month to month, we 
shall see for ourselves that they are moving past 
the star-groups in which they appear to be tempo- 
rarily located. 

There should be no difficulty in finding the 
constellation Leo, as its peculiar sickle-shaped 
group of bright stars makes it distinctive from all 
others. At the time we have mentioned, it will 
lie a little to the southwest of the zenith. Leo is 
one of the finest of the constellations and is al- 
ways associated with the spring months because 
it is then high in the sky in the evening. 

Due south of Denebola about thirty degrees, 
we shall find the small star-group known as Crater, 
the Cup, which is composed of rather faint and 
inconspicuous stars. Just east of Crater is the 
group known as Corvus, the Crow, which forms 
a very characteristic little four-sided figure of 
stars differing very little from one another in 
brightness. 

These two star-groups lie far to the south in our 
latitudes; but if we lived twenty degrees south 
of the equator, we should find them nearly over- 
head at this time of year. 

Next month we will take up the constellations 
that lie near the meridian during the early even- 
ing hours from the first to the middle of June. 
We must bear in mind, however, that we cannot 
become acquainted with the stars through books 
alone, but with our charts in hand, must go out- 
doors and discover for ourselves the various star- 
groups whose acquaintance we wish to make. 

Isabel M. Lewis. 



THE TIPTOE TWINS' FLOWER FESTIVAL 




1. SOME INDIAN POKE THE TWINS ESPY 



1 f -.:l,W^a~ 




3. SHY LIVERWORTS ARE NOT AFRAID, 



'4j * 




5. SPRING BLOSSOMS IN PROCESSION PASS, 



-T" ' it) 




2. THEN THIS QUEER "CABBAGE" MEETS THEIR EYE. 



| ( y^f 




4. BUT ASK THEM TO THE FLOWER PARADE. 



! I 




0. TRIPPING LIGHT THROUGH THE MEADOW GRASS. 



66o 



FOR VERY LITTLE FOLK 




ST. NICHOLAS LEAGUE 

A STORY OF THE ROAD 

BY ELIZABETH CLEAVELAND (AGE 14) 

(Gold Badge. Silver Badge won November, igig) 
I am the road. Like man, I am born, I live, nourish, 
wither, and die. Like man, I progress with the centu- 
ries. I spring from an Indian trail, a deer path leading 
to a pool; I spring from a brook bed; I am crossed off; 
I grow until I become a thriving thoroughfare — a high- 
way for rich and poor, good and bad, big and little. 
The primeval warrior made me to become a short-cut 
to his cave; the Egyptian put me to good use; the Greek 
made me beautiful; and the Roman gave me perfection. 

I am the Appian Way; I am Fifth Avenue; I am the 
Lincoln Highway — I am everything that gives to man 
a route to progress and a path to experience. Lacking 
me, mountains would not have been crossed, deserts 
would remain barren, forests uncut, and buildings un- 
built. No people on this earth survive without me 
excepting the Venetian. The horse would remain use- 
less, the automobile uninvented, if it were not for me. 
Corduroy, street, trail, path, subway, or avenue, over 
mountains, stretched across measureless prairies, 
plains and deserts, through cities or forests— anywhere 



and everywhere. I am a road and lead mankind— yet I 
am what mankind makes me. 

Yea — great is the romance of the road ! 

A SONG OF SPRING 
A Rondel 

BY ELEANOR SLATER (AGE 1 7) 

(Honor Member) 
Springtime comes with her fair face glowing, — 

Star-eyed Spring, — and she calls to me, 
Flying, fleet, with her bright hair flowing, 

Bearing dew from the shining sea, 
And she sings with the birds and the breezes blowing, 
Nursing the buds on a leafing tree. 

Springtime comes with her fair face glowing, 

Star-eyed Spring, — and she calls to me. 
So away to the fields where the flowers are growing, 

To sip the dew with the droning bee; 
And away to the tree-crowned hills I 'm going, 
To race where the sky-born winds run free. 

Springtime comes with her fair face glowing, 

Star-eyed Spring, — and she calls to me. 

PRIZE COMPETITION No. 254 
DDrto . u (In makin g awards contributors' ages are considered) 

n«V , f' At AnnS Waldron ( a g e I 5). California; Elinor Welch (age 10) Connecticut- Elizabeth 

p7 v -iw Badges Margaret Humphrey (age 13), Oregon; Margaret C. Schnidler (age ia) Wisconsin- 

drawings' c nr E ( T I5 i; Mi r so,a: D ° Jh > j™°£?™u%? ■ Hl " (age ,4) ' 

PHOTOGRAPHS. Gold Badge, Erika Peters (age 14), Texas. Silver Badges Alice McNeal (a,e 
Missouri; Catherine Fox (age 12), Wisconsin; Elizabeth Wrightman (a^e n) New York Helen sJLnH« 

PUZZLE-MAKING Gold Badges, Alice Sherburne (age 15), Massachusetts- Lydia A Cutler faee ,0 

piS a kNl™^ Dw ^^^ b Pentreath (age I4) > Indiana - 

PUZZLE ANSWERS. Silver Badge, Dorothy Donaldson (age 14), New York. 




BY HELEN SYMONDS, AGE I 5 . (SILVER BADGE) 



BY ELIZABETH WRIGHTMAN, AGE 13. (SILVER BADGE) 

"REFLECTIONS" 



662 



ST. NICHOLAS LEAGUE 



663 



SPRING 

BY RALPH SARGENT BAILEY (AGE 1 6) 

(Silver Badge) 

When the sorely tried commuter, in his back-yard 
garden plot, 

Starts to wildly wield the rake and hoe and spade; 
When the ever bashful lover takes the blue forget-me-not 
With youthful ardor to his chosen maid; 

When the portly cotton magnate grumbles at a ninety- 
eight. 

And says his breakfast put him off his game; 
When the rubber-booted angler, with his rod and reel 
and bait. 

Splashes gravely in pursuit of fishy fame; 

When the bone-begoggled student dumps his books 
upon the floor. 
Arid tells the world he 's out to have his fling; 
Just recall that vanquished Winter has indeed gone 
out the door; 
Just remember, gentle reader, that it 's Spring. 

A STORY OF THE ROAD 
(A True Story) 

BY CLAIRE FAITOUTE (AGE 12) 

(Silver Badge) 

Mother, Daddy, and I left Chicago at seven o'clock 
one night in midwinter, on the Overland Limited for 
San Francisco. We were in the observation car, which 
is the last one, and we had a drawing-room in the center 
of the car. 

Two nights later we were awakened at about one- 
thirty by a terrible crash. Every one was startled, and 
as soon as possible we got up to investigate, and found 
that we were at the top of the Rocky Mountains in a 
driving blizzard, and the snow was so deep that the tele- 
graph-wires rested on the snow! And the car was ele- 
vated ten feet with the engine of the snow-plow, which 
had been following us, under it, with the front of the 
snow-plow right through the car up to the writing- 
desk. We all moved into the smoking-car, and our car, 
called Black Beauty, was left with the snow-plow in the 
mountains. 

The train had a powerful light on the end; and when 
questioned why he did not see this light, the engineer 
of the snow-plow said that he had been working for 
forty-eight hours without sleep and had gone to sleep 
in the engine. 

Luckily no one was hurt except one man, who had 
his knee fractured. 

Now Mother always looks to see if the car Black 
Beauty is on our train, because we afterward heard 
that that car had had many accidents, and everybody 
considered it an unlucky car. 

ON THE ROAD 

BY ANNE WALDRON (AGE 1 5) 

(Gold Badge. Silver Badge won May, IQ20) 
"Then the whining school-boy, with his satchel 
And shining morning face, creeping like snail 
Unwillingly to school. 

("As You Like It": Act II, Scene 7) 
There you have the tale entire; for that self-same 
school-boy creeps along another road — The Road to 
Learning. He ascends with more or less facility the 
long upward pull of grammar school. Then he reaches 
a door, and above it is written "Latin Grammar." O 
young pilgrim, the mountains grow very rough! Also 
there is another gate called "Algebra," from which he 



plunges from Latin Ridge into a slough which rivals 
that of the famous Christian. From the algebraic slough 
he struggles (possibly with the help of one who has 
passed that way before and is familiar with its twists 
and turns). Over History and English does he plod- 
looking continually up toward his goal, college credit, 
for to the strongest fall the fruits of battle. Latin Ridge 
is becoming almost level, with only a few steep places 




"REFLECTIONS." BY EMMA DANIELS, AGE 15- (SILVER BADGE) 



here and there. English and History are merging into 
a broad meadow-land. 

In the next period of his pilgrimage is opened unto 
him "Modern Languages." Over the slopes of Chem- 
istry, slaying the dragon Geometry with the sword 
Common Sense, onward and upward he climbs, till at 
length he passes through the portals of college. On- 
ward he struggles and still upward, but climbing now 
the mountains upon which he has determined. Then 
at last he halts, holding in his hand his diploma, and, 
standing at the top, looks back — and laughs! 

A SONG OF SPRING 

BY HELEN R. OHL (AGE 17) 

(Silver Badge) 
Oh, springtime in the South! where at the morn 

The mocking-bird trills forth a carol gay; 
Where through the trees the cardinal is borne 

On flaming wings. And, like a golden ray, 
The wild canary glows 'mid dark-green pines; 

The querulous catbird mews in fragrant haunts; 

The dogwood all its whitened banners flaunts; 
The dainty iris grows — its bright gold shines; 
Its purple vies with neighboring violets' tints; 

The trumpet-flower sends forth blood-red gleams; 
The scented jasmine like the sunshine glints; 

The sweet, white violet dwells by mossy streams; 
The sapphire sky shades into amethyst; 
Oh southern spring! with thee I '11 keep my tryst. 



664 



ST. NICHOLAS LEAGUE 



IN BLOSSOM TIME— AN ACROSTIC 

BY MARGARET HUMPHREY (AGE 13) 

(Gold Badge. Silver Badge won February, 1020) 
Is there other time so dear? 
Never, throughout all the year! 

Bluebells sway on slender stems, 

Lilies glow — pale, pearly gems; 

Orchids' opalescent hues 

Shine in the swamp. Wet with spring dews 

Sweet May-flowers blow in hidden places, 

Or daisies fill all open spaces. 

Many the cowslips 'round the spring; 

The birds thro' flutt'ring petals sing. 
In every land the folk love May. 
Mid blossoms sweet the children play; 
Ever will blossom time be gay! 



IMay 




ON THE ROAD— A TRUE STORY 

BY PAUL WHITE (AGE 1 2) 

(Silver Badge) 

Two days last summer I hauled lumber from a planing- 
miU in east Texas to a farm about seven miles away 
It took a whole day to make a round trip, counting 
waiting for lumber to be planed. I had company be- 
cause four wagons were hauling the same as I. 

Nothing happened the first day; but on the second. 
Mr. Balcom and I took a short cut home. As we came 
down a small sandy hill I noticed my lumber slipping 
forward. I tried to stop the team, but the lumber slid 
1 Tdo?° n R them - ™ ey Started r ™S- What was 

hict wood ° T^ 6 la " en 1 PUll6d my team in to the 

ground Th T, S 3 hard jar - ! was on t'Ke 

ground. The wagon had run into a stump, breaking 

two trace-chains, and the coupling-pole. I was unhurt! 



BY JACOB JANKOWITZ, AGE IS 
(SILVER BADGE) 




BY DOROTHY H. ANDERSON, AGE 17 
(SILVER BADGE) 




A STORY OF THE ROAD 

BY RUTH BUFFINGTON' (AGE 13) 

The road that leads through Concord is a winding one, 
passing by many interesting places 

A little way into the town is Louisa May Alcott's 
home. On each side of the doorway stands a huge e m 

wil U e! l u ? CUSt ° m long ago for the husband and 

wife each to plant a tree by the doorway.) The house is 
an old, brown, weather-beaten one. let back a little 
way, in the woods behind the house, is Mr. Alcott's 
ittle school-house. It is very plain, quaint, and old- 
fashioned. Within the house we see the smah attic 
room where Miss Alcott wrote "Little Women 

We then leave the house and again follow the twisting 
road, past Hawthorne's "Old Manse." It. too, is brown 
and weather-beaten. About a block away is a white 
budding with bright green blinds-a true old New 
Eng and home. It is where Emerson lived 

We ride on for a time, passing all the quaint, queer 
houses and see on his pedestal in the middle of the 

th r e e minnfe bef ° re ^ N ° rth ^ » 

the m mute-man, erected in honor of the soldiers who 

bu tThJ h H 6 h ? d - N ° rth BHdge haS been to ™ down 
it What 1 P j » ' ts P> a « is said to be much like 

I , J f amed ° f thE St ° ry ° f the roads of Concord 
L snail never forget. 



BY DOROTHY VAN GORDER, 
AGE 14. (SILVER BADGE) 



A SONG OF SPRING 

BY MARGARET W. HALL (AGE 1 4) 

(Silver Badge) 

' T iL he h igh ; h0 v/° f r the blossomi ng spring-time 
And heigh-ho for the golden day; 

T is heigh-ho for the greening wild-woods 
And a song for the month o' May. 

Oh there 's joy all 'round about us; 

There 's joy in the babbling brook; 
there s joy in the birds' mad carol- 

Joy dwells in the woodland nook ' 
So heigh-ho for the birds a-mating 

And heigh-ho for the blossoming fields 
And a song for all the pleasure 

Our joyous springtime yields. 

There 's a whisper in the south-wind, 

"Oh, cast your cares away I 
Come, frolic with me in the meadow; 

With me, be glad and gay'" 
So heigh-ho for the blossoming springtime, 

And heigh-ho for the golden day; 
Heigh-ho for the greening wild-woo'ds 

And a song for the month o' May 



tern] 



ST. NICHOLAS LEAGUE 



665 




BY EVA C. STEVENS, AGE II 



BY ERIKA PETERS, AGE 14. (GOLD BADGE. 
SILVER BADGE WON JANUARY, 192 1) 



BY ALICE MCNEAL, AGE 14 
(SILVER BADGE) 



"REFLECTIONS" 



A STORY OF THE ROAD 



BY MARY E. BALLARD (AGE 1 5) 

(Silver Badge) 

We were riding slowly up one of the steepest inclines 
of the Mohawk Trail when the engine suddenly stopped. 
Fortunately, Father was able to find the trouble, and 
while he repaired the break we walked on up the moun- 
tain road to "explore." We came upon a path which, 
from appearances, had not been used for some time, 
and, to our surprise, Louise seemed to grow excited. 
"I 've seen it at last!" she cried. 

"Seen what?" we asked in amazement. 

"Why, don't you know? This is the place where the 
road branches off and meets the trail of the Mohawk 
Indians!" she replied. 

After we had calmed down to some extent, she told 
us the story. 

"Every year, when the Mohawk Indians crossed 
from the Hudson River to the Connecticut River to 
catch the salmon which came up the Connecticut from 
the Sound, they followed this same trail. 

"It happened that this trail crossed Florida Mountain 
and proved the easiest route of travel from one side to 
the other; so when a road was built, the engineers 
naturally followed the old trail. In some places, where 
it was too steep, the trail was left for a short distance; 



and this path is one of the places where it was too steep 
to follow." 

"Oh!" was all that we could say. "To think of seeing 
a. real Indian trail!" 

"And that is n't all, either," said Louise; "for this 
very road passes over the Hoosac Tunnel, the longest 
railroad tunnel in the United States!" 

We were quite startled when Father came up with 
the automobile, for the thought of being on an Indian 
trail had made us alert to all sounds. 

After telling Father the story we turned our atten- 
tion to "the road." 

A SONG OF SPRING 

BY MARGARET C. SCHNIDLER (AGE 14) 

(Cold Badge. Silver Badge won January, IQ21) 
Fairyland is all awake, for I see the grasses shake 
Where the little people go. Lightly dancing to and fro, 
Round about the fairy ring, in the long warm nights of 
spring. 

In the center, on the ground, Queen Titania is found, 
With her consort, Oberon, who a toadstool sits upon. 
Peter Pan his pipes will blow as they circling round 
him go. 

Weirdly high and shrill pipes he for the fairy company. 
When such music he will make, fairyland is all awake. 




BY ALEXANDER GMELIN, AGE 13. 



(HONOR MEMBER) 

"REFLECTIONS" 



BY JESSIE F. SIMPSON, AGE 14 



666 



ST. NICHOLAS LEAGUE 




ETHEL FULPER, AGE I 
(SILVER BADGE) 



' JOYCE PORTER, AGE 1 . 

'REFLECTIONS" 



BY ELIZABETH A. MARSH, AGE 14 



IN BLOSSOM TIME 

BY RAE YERRILI. (AGE 13) 

{Cold Badge. Silver Badge won January, 102 1) 
Across the meadows garbed in green, where the wild 

narcissus grow 
And snowdrops peep from shady nooks, like flakes of 

sparkling snow; 
Where rosy petals from the trees are strewn upon the 

grass, 

Proserpina, Herald of Spring, will, dancing lightly, pass. 
The swallowtails, in yellow coats all trimmed with 

black and blue, 
Will court the golden daffodils— they 're lovers fond 

and true. 

The little brook runs babbling on and ripples down the 
hill, 

Now murmuring in gladsome song and blithesome, 
happy trill. 

The little birds burst out' in song,— for all is wondrous 
gay, — 

While in the pasture just ahead are little lambs at play 
1 he zephyrs sing their song of love and drift among the 
trees ; 

The little white-caps on the sea are dancing in the 
breeze. 

The bell up there in the belfry tall peals out its joyful 
chime; 

It seems to say: " 'T is Spring! 't is Spring!— and this 
is blossom time!" 

A STORY OF THE ROAD 

BY DOROTHY V. A. FULLER (AGE 1 7) 

(Honor Member) 
"Senor," Amelio, the squat little Mexican rider, was 
speaking to his thoroughbred, "Senor, the bandidos are 
after us! Cielost And I have promised you to el Senor 
[the master] safe at Juarez by to-morrow night. Cielos 
again ! They are closer, mi Senor; they are after you O 
mi Caballol" 

A long stretch of desert lay in front of horse and rider- 
a longer stretch behind. A little gully and a stream 



bed were farther on. Amelio seemed to know the place 
He dismounted there and began unsaddling Senor. As 
he did so, he chuckled: 

"Now for the transformation, Novio miol Anda!" He 
led the way to the bottom of the stream bed and pointed 
to the mud. "Lie down!" A Mexican thoroughbred 
never hesitates. Down he went into the mud "Roll'" 
Senor rolled. Then the keen little groom produced 
. some shears and went to work. 

Meanwhile, the ring of horses' hoofs was rapidly ' 
coming nearer. The hoof-beats echoed through the 
cactus aisles of the desert. 

When the bandidos came up to Amelio they saw a 
very ragged fellow cutting wood, and an old, decrepit 
nag standing listlessly by. The leader addressed the 
peon m voluble, disrespectful Spanish. Had he seen a 
horse, a fine horse, pass that way? They had lost one— 
a wonderful animal. He did n't know? He was "un 
bobo" [a stupid fellow] then! And on the fierce-looking 
bandidos rode. 

When they were out of sight, Amelio turned to the 
muddy, unkempt beast. "Senor," he said, in high good 
humor, "we are actors as good as those at El Teatro de 
Mejico, no es verdad? [Is it not true?] No, Senor, we 
shall not stop to wash. Ahora!" 

And they took the road, at the pace of a thorough- 
bred only, toward Juarez across the desert. 




REFLECTIONS. ' 



BY MEDORA THOMSON, AGE -13 



ST. NICHOLAS LEAGUE 



A SONG OF SPRING 

BY BILLY CARMAN (AGE 15) 

(Silver Badge) 
When the sky has lost its grayness 

And the sun shines bright again; 
When the smell of green things growing 

Seems to follow close the rain. 
Then I hear the soft winds whisper, 

Light as birds upon the wing, 
And they murmur sweetly to me 

Just the one word. "Spring!" 

When the trees have gained the grandeur 

That they lost with winter's show, 
And the plum-trees with their blossoms 

Heavy laden, bend more low, 
Then the brooklet, rushing onward, 

Pausing in his course to sing, 
While I listen, softly whispers 

Just the one word. "Spring!" 

When the robins in the orchard 

Sing with joy of mating-time, 
With the help of Mother Nature 

Heaven and Earth are sure to rhyme. 
As I sit there, musing, dreaming, 

Happier than any king, 
Comes a child who whispers softly 

Just the one word, "Spring!" 

IN BLOSSOM TIME 

BY DOROTHY JAYNE (AGE 1 5) 

(Silver Badge) 
A breeze that was sailing through tree-tops one day 
Saw an orchard asleep — 'T was the middle of May. 
He said with a wink, "I see 't is my duty 
To awake with a kiss this old sleeping beauty" 
So softly he whispered, "Wake up, my old dear; 
It 's the spring of the year. Time for the blossoms is 
near. 

I invite all the blossoms and bid them be gay." 
And he gave her a kiss ere he sped on his way. 

The blossoms came forth as soft as caresses, 
Gaily decked out in their dear little dresses; 
And the lazy brown orchard that zephyr had kissed 
Was hidden as tho' by a lacy white mist. 
When the breeze saw the blossoms, he made them a 
bow. 

And they all dropped him curtsies, as blossoms- know 
how. 

Then he whistled a gay little tune, if you please. 
And the blossoms all nodded and danced with the 
breeze. 

ON THE ROAD 

BY MARY J. FOLSOM (AGE 15) 

(Silver Badge) 

It was early Christmas morning in nineteen-seventeen, 
and over bumps and holes. Sergeant DeNyse was 
driving his big truck. How gloomy and wet it was! 
And what a beast of a place for a fellow to be, anyway! 
But it was war, so, trying to keep in mind the box 
from home which was, no doubt, awaiting him, the 
sergeant drove on. 

"What 's this?" asked Private Ted Conroy, who 
was with him, straining his neck for a better view of 
some trucks coming toward them. 

In a few minutes Sergeant DeNyse drew up alongside 
of the first truck, that had just been stopped by its driver. 

"Fifty-first Pioneer!" announced one of the nevv- 




"ready." by otho b. 
blake, age 16 
(honor member) 



'READY. BY EDWARD G. MURPHY, 
AGE 13. (HONOR MEMBER) 



comers, and the blue-eyed ser- 
geant's face fairly beamed. 
"Oh, boy!" he breathed. "Could it be possible?" 
Then, aloud, he called out: 

"Private Will DeNyse happen to be in the bunch. 
Buddy?" and he scanned the other trucks expectantly. 

"Sure thing, Art!" came a new voice. 

It was n't long before the two brothers were grasping 
each other's hands, and Private Conroy gazed upon 
them with a lump in his throat. 

"For the love of Mike," the sergeant was blurting 
out, "I 've been looking for you since spring!" 

Private Will did not trust himself to answer at once, 
but when he did, it was rather chokily. 

"On Christmas day at that, old chap," he answered. 
"Glory! But Mother will be glad!" 

IN BLOSSOM TIME; or, DA LANDA SPREENG 

HELEN GRACE DAVIE (AGE l6) 

(Gold Badge. Silver Badge won May, 1020) 
Da lady from da "Settlament" ees com' 

An' ask eef she can tak' us out wan day — 
Ma leetla brudder Angelo an' me — 

For see da pretta field', an' run an' play 
Off from da dirta, smala street' 
Were birda, flower', an' tree' wan no can meet, 
To nice-a land w'ere eet ees bright an' clean. 
An' evra theeng ees sweet an' fresh an' green. 

Da lady say: "Da Spreeng ees here — enjoy!" 

We chasa den da butterfly an' bee; 
We runna. laugha — ah! so free an' gay, 

We ees so happy — Angelo an' me. 
A birda sudden from da grass ees spreeng, 
Eet fly up vera high, an' seeng an' seeng, 
So warma ees da sun, so blue da sky, 
So pretta all — I mos' baygeen to cry. 



Da kinda lady call at las' an' say: 

"Night ees com' soon — an' chil'ren home mus' 
But firs' we peeck da pretta buncha flower' 

For our poor Mama — Angelo an' me. 

Back here ees Mama seeck — da baby too; 
Da room so dark, so small no sun com' thro. 
Steel een my heart I hear da birda seeng — 
Eet seem' to say, "Not far da Landa Spreeng!" 



be! 



668 



ST. NICHOLAS LEAGUE 



[May 




A STORY OF THE ROAD 

BY ELINOR WELCH (AGE 10) 

(Gold Badge. Silver Badge won February, 1021) 
One morning, Edith Long was out in a sleigh with her 
grandfather on one of the country roads near Boston. 
She was not in a very good humor, and as the road was 
both long and muddy, she began to get tired of just 
sitting and not getting anywhere and cried impatiently, 
What a stupid road this is!" 
Her grandfather smiled and said, "Well, perhaps it 
is. But if you knew what this road knows, you would 
think better of it." 

"What this road knows?" Edith repeated. "What 
does this road know, Grandfather?" she added eagerly. 

Mr. Long, glad to see Edith's good humor return, 
replied, "Some hundred odd years ago, Paul Revere 
made his famous ride over this road; many small skirm- 
ishes were fought here, and last, but not least, this road 
was included in one of the most important secrets of 
this town, for not far from here is a tremendous rock in 
which is a tunnel where many kegs of powder were hid- 
den during the Revolutionary War." 

"But, Grandfather," interposed Edith. "How do 
you know where the powder was kept? You were n't 
alive in the Revolution." 

"Because my grandfather, who was a colonel then 
told my father, and he told me," answered Mr. Long' 
"And now," he concluded, "would you like to go over 
and see the rock where the powder was kept?" 

"I should think so!" replied Edith; "and I take back 
all I said about this being a stupid road." 




A STORY OF A ROAD 

BY VIRGINIA MCVAY (AGE 1 5) 

(The Road of the Loving Heart) 
Far away on a little island, unimportant and remote 
from civilization, runs such a road as is not to be seen 
in the most powerful countries of the world. 

Once, a Scotchman came to this island, near to death 
and wishing, because of the favorable climate, to spend 
his last days there. He bought a plantation and settled 
down quietly, but soon he became interested in the 
affairs of the natives. The two sides could not agree 
and there was continual strife. It was this exile from 
his own land who helped them, advised them, and gave 
them his love, until, when warfare had ceased, both 
sides called him their friend. 

But even when war had ceased, many chieftains were 
still m prison because of their political views. This 
Scotchman made it his work to feed them, and he worked 
long and patiently at his task. He saved the prisoners 
from death, visited them, comforted them, and pleaded 
for them, until at last they were released. 
,„^. ow this man ' whom the natives called Tusitala 
(Teller of Tales), had long wanted a certain road built 
And the gratitude of these chieftains for what he had 
done for them was such that in spite of age, sickness 
heat, and hundreds of other obstacles, they set them- 
selves to building this road. In time it was finished 
and they called it 'The Road of The Loving Heart,' as a 
present, that might endure forever. 

Soon after, the Scotchman died, to be mourned sin- 
cerely by many people, but no one mourned him more 
sincerely than did these humble natives. 

The world knows this man, whom the natives called 
Tusitala, as Robert Louis Stevenson, and it is because 
"the day was no longer than his kindness" that the 
story of the Road of the Loving Heart can be told. 



A list of those vs 
permitted: 

David D. Lloyd 
Oliver Gale 
Miriam Grosvenor 
Bert Shapiro 
Minnie Pfeferberg 
Silvia A . 

Wunderlich 
Caroline Everett 
Marion 

Reissemveber 
Constance M. 

Palmer 



SPECIAL MENTION 



hose work would have been used had space 



'READY." (PAUL REVERE.) BY PENELOPE LEWIS, AGE 12 
(GOLD BADGE. SILVER BADGE WON MARCH, 1921) 



Barbara Irish 
Helen E. Waile 
Birkbeck Wilson 
Margaret J. 

Mcjennetl 
Chiyo Hirose 
Catharine Stone 
Francis S. 

Tuckerman 
Elizabeth E. Clarke 
Elizabeth Kingsbury 
Catherine Parmentcr 

Frances Oler 
Worlhen Bradley 
Dorothy C. Miller 
M url Daniels 
Isabelle Haskell 
Kathleen Murray 
Dorothy M iner 



Katharine McAfee 
Edna Bahr 
Alan V. McGee 
Jane Ashcrafl 
Edith O'D. Hunter 



PROSE 
Richard Barrow 
Florence Finch 
Peggy Cook 
Mary Hulse 
Mary Vernia 
Josephine Rolhchild 
Geraldine Goodwin 
Eleanor Schlytler 
Alice L. Sterling 
Olive Mulford 
Willard Laning, Jr. 
Dorothy R. Burnett 

VERSE 
Margaret 

Mackprang 
Mollie L. Craig 
John I. Daniel 
Rudolph Cook 
Fanita Laurie 
Malvina Holcombc 
Mary L. Mayo 
Ernest 0. Knock 
Charlotte Reynolds 
Mignon Rittenhouse 

DRAWINGS 
Karla Henrich 
Hester Laning 
Alan Atkins 
Edith Burr 
Gladys Lull 
Dorothy 
McGonigal 

PHOTOGRAPHS 
Wm. C. Hanna 
Helen F. Bloomer 
Helen Bowman 
Eleanor M. Rugh 
Editha Wright 



Constance M. 

O'Hara 
Jeanne L. Jaquith 
Dorothy I. Dixon 
May Wright 
Evelyn L. Everitt 
Margaret P. 

Coleman 
William M. Hiester 
Ruth Wilkinson 
Barbara Simison 
Walter Hurley 



Belly Fulton 
Eleanor F. Scott 
Margaret McCulloh 
Carol Kaufman 
Edith Har grave 
Ruth Clevenger 
Ruth Dennis 
Helen Simonson 
H elen L. MacLeod 
Virginia H. 
Chapman 



Veronica Irwin 
Elizabeth Boyle 
Theodore Hall, Jr. 
Cornelia Jones 
Helen S. Johnson 
Lucille Duff 
Helen Coyne 



Benjamin V. 

White, Jr. 
Ruth H. Dimick 
Betty Hobarl 
Winifred Blackwell 



1921] 



ST. NICHOLAS LEAGUE 



669 



ROLL OF HONOR 

A list of those whose contributions were deserving of high 
praise: 

Florence Frear Theron W. 

Alice L. McCaul Butterworth 
Merrill Jones Stanley Saxton 

Josephine Burras Eunice Cooke 



WHAT THE LEAGUE IS 



PROSE 
Louise Hullihen 
Martha E. Smith 
Nelson B. Pendleton 
Frances S. Holliday 
Eleanor Jones 
Mildred Ridley 
Frances Pierson 
Alyse V. Evans 
Emily Hall 
Mary Elmer 



MarianH.Stanwood Sallie McKenzie 
Emma M. McCully Barbara F. Smith 



~1 




"READY." BY FRANCES 
CLARKE, AGE 13 

Frank L. Heaton 
Elizabeth Barton 
Meyer Lisbanoff 
S. E. Briggs 
Mary R. Eaton 
Julia F. Doughty 
Josephine Rankin 
Gwynne M. Dresser 
Edward D. Cushing 
Willard Anderson 
Marian 

Frankenfield 
Margaret Durick 

VERSE 
Allen S. Weller 
Elizabeth Wilcox 
Madeleine Girvan 
Edward B. Black 
Charline Raub 
Catharine M. 

Dawson 
Jessica L. Megaw 
Elizabeth Brainerd 
Janet B. McAfee 
Carolina McCall 
Anne L. New 
Laura D. Petersen 
Mary E. Eaves 
Hope Sterling 
Frederick S. Pearson 
Ellen A. Frank 
William Aydelotte 
Emily Kingsbury 
Julia Van der Veer 
Barbara Maniere 
Winifred Rollins 
Jane E. Clover 



DRAWINGS 
Frances-Lee Purnell 
Victoria Potter 
Julia Polk 

Beatrice Vogt 
Katharine 

Wolfe 
Shirley Behr 
Francis H. 

Szecskay 
Kate Reynolds 
Shirley Strouse 
Dorothy 

Schwendener 
Kathleen Von 

Goutard 
Albert Reader 
Nancy Benoist 
Katharine 
Eastman 
Beatrice Parvin 
Grace Griffin 
Florence Fowler 
Maureen 

Harrington 
Amy Tatro 
Richard G. 

Hill. Jr. 
Patricia E. 

Smith 
Marjorie I. 
Miller 

PHOTO- 
GRAPHS 
MaryB.Claxton 
Gladys Morton 



E. K. Graves 
Jonathan H. Niles 
John Curtis 
Caroline M. Ashton 
Katherine C. 

Rubens 
Kathleen Haste 
Nancy S. Morgan 
Rhea Levy 
Meryl Stateler 
Rose C. 

Merryweather 
Helen Steele 
Helen MacGregor 
Mary H. Bush 
Virginia Mitchell 
Katharine Hubbard 
Robert B. Bell 
Seymour Offutt 
Katherine Burton 
James C. Perkins, 
Jr. 

Muriel M. Craig 
Dorothy Gray 
Helen C. Furer 
Louise Hudson 
Sylvia Cook 
Frances E. Duncan 
Evelyn Paxton 
Hugh W. Watson 
Margery E. 

Benedict 
Endicott Hanson 
Susan McBryde 
Gwendolyn Randall 
Frances G. Crossley 
Margaret Maugis 
Rachel Hammond 




BY MARY LUNDBERG, AGE 13 
(SILVER BADGE) 



Cecily B. Fox 
Anne Wyman 
Virginia H. Miley 
Caroline E. 
Heminway 




BY EVELYN WYSE, AGE 15 



PUZZLES 
R. Thulin 
Marion Kilbourn 
Philip Reynolds 
Eugencia Leigh 
Dorothy M. Jones 
Alexander B. 

Griswold 
Jocelyn Crane 
Alice R. Loyall 
Robert C. Osborne, 

Jr. 

Sarah H. Murray 
Adele S. Weiler 
Berenice L. Lasher 



The St. Nicholas League is an organization of 
the readers of the St. Nicholas Magazine. 

The League motto is " Live to learn and learn to 
live." 

The League emblem is the "Stars and Stripes." 

The League membership button bears the 
League name and emblem. 

The St. Nicholas League organized in Novem- 
ber, 1899, became immediately popular with earnest 
and enlightened young folks, and is now widely rec- 
ognized as one of the great artistic educational 
factors in the life of American boys and girls. 

The St. Nicholas League awards gold and silver 
badges each month for the best original poems, 
stories, drawings, photographs, puzzles, and puzzle 
answers. 

PRIZE COMPETITION No. 258 

Competition No. 258 will close June 3. All con- 
tributions intended for it must be mailed on or 
before that date. Prize announcements will be 
made and the selected contributions published in 
St. Nicholas for September. Badges sent one 
month later. 

Verse. To contain not more than twenty-four 
lines. Subject, "The Harvest" or "Harvest lime." 

Prose. Essay or story of not more than three 
hundred words. Subject, "A Proud Moment." 

Photograph. Any size, mounted or unmounted; 
no blue prints or negatives. Young photographers 
need not print and develop their pictures them- 
selves. Subject, "At the Corner." 

Drawing. India ink, very black writing-ink, or 
wash. Subject, "A Familiar Object" or "A Head- 
ing for September." 

Puzzle. Must be accompanied by answer in full. 

Puzzle Answers. Best and neatest complete set 
of answers to puzzles in this issue of St. Nicholas. 
Must be addressed to The Riddle-box. 

No unused contribution can be returned unless it 
is accompanied by a self-addressed and stamped en- 
velop of proper size to hold the manuscript or picture. 

RULES 

Any reader of St. Nicholas, whether a subscriber 
or not, is entitled to League membership, and upon 
application a League badge and leaflet will be sent 
free. No League member who has reached the age 
of eighteen years may compete. 

Every contribution, of whatever kind, must bear 
the name, age, and address of the sender and 
be indorsed as "original" by parent, teacher, or 
guardian, who must be convinced beyond 
doubt — and must state in writing — that the 
contribution is not copied, but wholly the work 
and idea of the sender. 

If prose, the number of words should also be added. 
These notes must not be on a separate sheet, but on 
the contribution itself — if manuscript, on the upper 
margin; if a picture, on the margin or back. Write 
in ink on one side of the paper only. A contributor 
may send but one contribution a month — not one of 
each kind, but one only; this, however, does not in- 
clude "competitions" in the advertising pages or 
"Answers to Puzzles." 

Address: The St. Nicholas League, 
The Century Co. 
353 Fourth Avenue, New York. 



THE LETTER-BOX 



r-, _ „, Bayonne, N. T. 

Dear St. Nicholas: When I was reading your Jan- 
uary number the thing that interested me most was the 
play I 11 Try. I showed it to my teacher who liked 
it as much as I did. We decided to give it at promotion 
time in honor of the graduating class. 

It was hard work for us to get it up, for we only have 
one session of school, and the school building has no 
auditorium. Almost everybody in our class was in it 
from the largest girl, who was Mrs. Benedict, to the 
smallest, who was The Article. I was Caroline 

Nobody was satisfied to have her part written out- 
each one must have St. Nicholas. Now, a number are 
your readers. 

We could not have elaborate costumes, but we did the 
best we could. The Fairy Patience wore a white dress 
which she had, a crown, and a wand. Queen Grammar 
borrowed a costume, while King English just wore a 
crown. The parts of speech just had placards. 

The day it was given we had a chorus first, then the 
play. It seemed as if everybody was suited to her part 
The mothers were invited, and a number were there 
It was a great success and everybody wanted us to 
repeat it. There was another chorus afterward, and 
that ended the program. 

Our new teacher wants us to give another St. Nich- 
olas play. 

Thanking you for the happy hours you have given me. 
Yours affectionately, 

Mary C. Pope (ace ii). 

,, „ _ _ San Francisco, Cal. 

Dear St. Nicholas: I have seen the butterfly-tree at 
Facinc Grove which was described in the November 
number of St. Nicholas. 

Last summer I was in Truckee. One day, thousands 
and thousands of orange-brown butterflies, with dark 
markings, flew over the town. They flew from the 
other side of the mountain, through the woods, over 
the river, and toward Lake Tahoe. Sometimes some 
rested on trees and houses for a few minutes and then 
went on. They spread out for over a mile and were 
still flying when the sun went down. 

Your devoted reader, 

Martha Mottram (age 8). 

Northampton, Mass. 
Dear St. Nicholas: Every month I wait impatiently 
lor my welcome friend, St. Nicholas! The stories I 
enjoy and have enjoyed most are "The Crimson Patch," 

The Luck of Denewood." "The Dragon's Secret," and 
all the short stones and poems. My little sister, who is 
five years old, likes to hear the things for very little folk 
Whenever St. Nicholas arrives, Constance (for that is 
her name) runs up and says, "Gladys! the Nicky 's here' 
The Nicky s here!" just as if she understood all the 
stones and all that the wonderful magazine contains. 

I have taken you for one year and this is the second. 
I can hardly wait for the next number to come. Even 
my grandmother and mother enjoy it with me. 
Yours lovingly, 

Gladys Polowetski (age 12). 

t— . „ _ T Evanston, III. 

Dear St. Nicholas: I have taken you for only a little 
over a year, but it seems to have been always. I don't 
know how I got along without you before I got you 
I love your St. Nicholas League and sometimes I 



670 



f ° r wu 1 th ' nk the peopIe that draw for ^ are won- 
ders When I try to draw with ink, it splotches and 
blotches so that I have to give it up. 

I have a darling little brown dog and a parrot The 
parrot says such funny things sometimes! He makes 
us all laugh very hard and joins in as heartily as any of 
us. He has a yellow head, that cocks and ruffles, and 
red tips on the wings and a tail of all kinds of colors. 
He talks just like a human being and not in that crazy 
way m which most parrots screech. 

Once I found myself in a picture in St. Nicholas 
It was with my sister and cousins at Uncle Charlie's' 
when General Pershing was there. General Pershing 
is about the finest, bravest, kindest man I ever saw 

1 have had ever so many pleasant times reading St 
Nicholas and I like it better than any magazine I 
have ever had. 

Your loving reader, 

Margaret Dawes. 

r>«rA„ o nt Tokio, Japan. 

Dear St. Nicholas: I have taken you for two years. 
You are a dandy! I always hurry to see you when you 
come from far-off America to me here in Japan. 

We spend our summers in Karuizawa, Japan. It is a 
fine place for summer sports. We play tennis, basket- 
ball and baseball, and take walks. Karuizawa is sur- 
rounded on all sides by mountains, and it used to be a 
crater hundreds of thousands of years ago. It is a 
town of about 1500 inhabitants, mostly Japanese 

Asama, one of the greatest active volcanoes in Ja- 
pan, has recently erupted. This volcano is about fif- 
teen miles away from Karuizawa. 

Sincerely yours, 
Charles Reifsnider, Jr. (age 14). 

j „ _ T Paris, France. 

Dear St. Nicholas: Although you receive letters from 
many distant parts of the world, I have lately seen few 
lrom Pans. You have been a member of the family 
before any ot the children could read, and Father used 
to read 'For Very Little Folk" to us. 

Paris is a wonderful city, but old-fashioned in many 
aspects They even have gas-lamps in the main 
thoroughfares! 

The other day I climbed to the top of the Arc de 
Tnomphe. By the time we were half-way up, our ardor 
started to cool. It seemed as if that dark, winding stair- 
way would never end. At last we reached the top, and 
expected to see light. But we had to cross a space, and 
climb another flight! But the view from the top was 
well worth the climb. Spread out below us was the 
Etoile, that is, the Star, with about sixteen roads and 
avenues branching out from the arch like the snokes 
of a wheel. 

Your loving friend. 

Alfred Tree (age 13 j. 

IN BLOSSOM TIME 
There is a time when the birds sing gaily 
When flowers bloom and blossom daily, 
When children laugh, and sing, and shout. 
Who can find the secret out? 
When is this time, when all things are merry? 

When children are glad and gay? 
Young women go 'round with cheeks like a cherry 
For this is the month of May. 

Marguerite Boies (age 10). 



ANSWERS TO PUZZLES 

Umbrella. 

Where the Bible forms public opin- 



O-pal. 3- N-eat. 4- 
Eggs. 2. 



Cross- Word Enigma. 

Numerical Enigma. 
ion, a nation must be free 

Additions. Monroe. I. M-ice. 
R-ill. 5. O-pen. 6. E-den. 

Primal Acrostic. Easter. Cross-words: 
Arts. 3. Soap. 4. Time. 5- Echo. 6. Rent. 

Pictured Poems. Longfellow, r. The Old Clock on the 
Stairs. 2. The Arrow and the Song. 3. The Lighthouse 4. 
The Phantom Ship. 5. The Two Angels 6 The Fiftieth 
Birthday of Agassiz. 7. Giotto's Tower. 8. The Harvest Moon, 
o. The Broken Oar. 

Charade. Rob-inn-hood. Robin Hood. 

Some Curious Pens. i. Pension. 2. Penitentiary 3. 
Pennant or pennon. 4- Penalty. 5. Pennsylvania. 6. Peni- 
tent 7 Pentecost. 8. Penguin. 9. Pendulum. 10. Penury. 



13 



Pentateuch. 14. Pennyroyal. 
Mole. 2. Opal. 3- Lamb. 4. 
Initials. 



IN THE APRIL NUMBER 

11. Penny. 12. Pensive. 
15. Penetrate. 

Rhymed Word-Squares. 

^A^'Literary Acrostic. Initials, Romeo and Juliet. From 
1 to 10 The Merchant of Venice; 20 to 29, Conolanus; 30 
to 39, The Tempest; 40 to 47, King Lear; 48 to 56, Cymbeline. 
Cross-words: 1. Right. 2. Ocean. 3. Mulch. 4. Epics 5. 
Ovate. 6. After. 7. Noisy. 8. Drake. 9 Joint. 10. Uncle. 
11. Lemon. 12. Inlet. 13. Ember. 14. Theme 

King's Move Puzzle. Robin, 73-65-64-74-66. Oriole, 75-07- 
57-48-40-30. Sparrow, 39-38-46-56-55-47-37. Crow 28-19-11-1. 
Canary 10-2-12-20-29-21. Finch, 22-32-24-14-4- Grosbeak, 3- 
IV5-6-7-15-25-17. Pheasant, 8-9-18-27-35-34-42-33. Eagle, 
23-31-41-51-50. Hawk, 49-59-58-68. Vulture 70-77-69-60-70- 
78-79 Pigeon, 80-71-81-72-63-62. Woodpecker, 61-53-43-52- 
44-54-45-36-26-16. 



To Our Puzzlers- Answers, to be acknowledged in the magazine, must be mailed not later than June 3, and should be addressed 

Cabell— H. Spencer and Henry Dormitzer— Allen T. Gifford— Helen A Moulton 7 _R ut h M. Willis, 7— Elizabeth 

Answers to Puzzles in the February Number were duly received *«*Jgg™* ^ 7 6-Frances DuBarry, 6-Jean 
Jacobus, 7— Hope Robertson, 7— Gwenfread E. Allen, ,— Bernard Konn. J •Marfm 00™ . 4 _Eleanor Thomas, 4— 

and John Foster, s-Edith H. Benjamin, S-R- and E Thulm, J-^^H A R Do vie 2— H M. Bennett, 2-U. Burden, 2-R. 
Isabel Scheuber, 3— Serena Davidson, 3— Hazel Barbour, 3— H. Steele, 2 n. a., uoyie, t 

Williams, 2— E. Tollefson, 2 r? u u mam H R — F H A — R M — K. McE.— R. S.— E. W— H. De S. L — 

O- Answer: W-M. S.-B. B.-E. A. B.-M. W. C.-C. C. 

-C O.-P S.-C V. jT-L E. H.-A. S. M.-A. R. M. Jr.-F. W. 



DOUBLE ZIGZAG 

(Gold Badge, St. Nicholas League Competition) 

3 Cross-words: i. A kind of soil. 2. A 
* r> noisy brawl. 3. Small insects. 4. The sur- 
name of an ex-President. 5. To "make 
eyes" at. 6. A Spanish-American laborer. 7. 
Twenty quires. 8. An author of metrical 
compositions. 9. Parts of circles. 10. Part 
of an egg. 

When these words have been rightly 
guessed and placed as shown in the diagram, 
the zigzags from 1 to 2 and from 3 to 4 will 
each name a fine city of the United States. 

LYDIA A. CUTLER (age IS). 

ARITHMETICAL PUZZLE 

When Mary was asked how old her dog was, she 
replied, "Tippy is one third of my age. Three years 
ago he was one sixth of my age, and five years hence 
he will be one half of my age." How old was Mary 
and how old was Tippy? 

kingsley kahler (age n), League Member. 

DOUBLE ACROSTIC 

My primals and my finals each name a flower. 
Cross-words (of equal length): 1. Injury. 2. A 
feminine name. 3- A fruit. 4- A common prefix. 5- 



A small branch. 6. Within. 7- A useful mineral. 8. 
Among. dorothy wood (age 12), League Member. 

A RIDDLE 

One half of a word is "ps" 
One third of a word is "es" 
One sixth of a word is "r" 
Now what is the word, if you please? 
Virginia koeppen (age 13), League Member. 

AN OBELISK 

(Gold Badge, St. Nicholas League Competition) 

Cross-words: i. In Riddle-box. 2. A 
pronoun. 3. A defile between mountains. 
4. Indigent. 5. A great country. 6. To 
. . . . . waste time in idleness. 7- Harshness. 8. 
. . . . . An Indian weapon. 9. To push or jostle, 
as with the elbow. 10. A simpleton. 11. 
' . . Weird. 12. To take away by violence or 
by stealth. 13. To collect and come to 
. . . . . order, as troops dispersed. 14- A sacred 
structure. 15. One who practices the black 

art, or magic. 

When these words have been rightly 
' guessed, and placed as shown in the dia- 

i . . . . gram, two of the rows of letters, reading 
upward, will spell two popular names. 

ALICE SHERBURNE (age 15). 



671 




ILLUSTRATED NUMERICAL ENIGMA 

In this enigma the words are pictured instead of 
described. The answer, consisting of thirty-five let- 
ters, is a quotation from Robert Browning. 

CHARADE 

My first gives orders which all must heed; 
My last is a weight which is used for feed; 
My whole is a wonderful city indeed. 

Elizabeth moller (age n), League Member. 

METAMORPHOSES 

The problem is to change one given word to an- 
other by altering one letter at a time, each alteration 
making a new word, the number of letters being always 
the same and the letters always in the same order. 
Example: Change wood to coal in three moves. 
Answer: wood, wool, cool, coal. 

1. Change rake to dirt in five moves. 

2. Change dirt to cart in two moves. 

3. Change cart to dump in four moves. 
jewette may scott (age n), League Member. 

PI 

Yam halls keam het drowl neaw, 
Gledon nus dan verils wed, 
Noyme, dentim ni het kys, 
Halls het sharte wen grentsam yub. 
adele goodman (age io), League Member. 

TRIPLE BEHEADINGS AND TRIPLE CURTAILINGS 

(Silver Badge, St. Nicholas League Competition) 
Example: Triply behead and triply curtail adver- 
saries, and leave a number. Answer: opp-one-nts. 

r. Triply behead and triply curtail easily affected, and 
leave to perch. 

2. Triply behead and triply curtail fading, and leave 
a pronoun. 

3. Triply behead and triply curtail unprejudiced, and 
leave acquired dexterity. 

4. Triply behead and triply curtail derisively and 
leave relatives. 

5. Triply behead and triply curtail threatening, and 
leave termination. 

6. Triply behead and triply curtail arrogant, and 
leave the full amount. 

7. Triply behead and triply curtail a comrade, and 
leave a kitchen utensil. 

8. Triply behead and triply curtail to break into, and 
leave to be mistaken. 



9. Triply behead and triply curtail benefit, and leave 
an emmet. 

10. Triply behead and triply curtail to make known 
by formal announcement, and leave a measure of length. 

11. Triply behead and triply curtail grudgingly per- 
mitted, and leave epoch. 

When these words have been correctly guessed, be- 
headed and curtailed, the initials of the eleven three- 
letter words remaining will spell the surname of a famous 
person. 

DEREXA WHITCOME PENTREATH (age 14). 



KING'S MOVE PUZZLE 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


• 6 


7 


8 


9 


T 


N 


E 


O 


1 


M 


Y 


s 


Y 


10 


1 1 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


H 


E 


S 


1 


P 


N 


T 


T 


R 


,9 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


E 


E 


R 


R 


D 


A 


R 


A 


E 


28 


29 


30 


31 


32 


33 


34 


35 


36 


1 


c 


G 


P 


E 


E 


S 


F 


P 


37 


38 


39 


40 


41 


42 


43 


.44 


45 


M 


R 


1 


P 


E 


E 


O 


1 


D 


46 


47 


48 


49 


50 


51 


52 


53 


54 


N 


S 


L 


R 


1 


u 


L 


S 


E 


55 


56 


57 


58 


59 


60 


61 


62 


63 


O 


P 


S 


E 


H 


L 


H 


G 


u 


64 


65 


66 


67 


68 


69 


70 


71 


72 


T 


A 


H 


T 


M 


s 


A 


u 


s 


73 


74 


75 


76 


77 


78 


79 


80 


81 


C 


H 


T 


N 


A 


A 


E 


T 


A 



Begin at a certain square and move to an adjoining 
square (as in the king's move in chess) until each square 
has been entered once. When the moves have been 
correctly made, the name of a writer and three stories 
by this writer may be spelled out. The path from one 
letter to another is continuous. 

susan e. lyman (age 14), League Member. 



THE lil iMI'OUI) 1 
CONOOED 





BEECH-NUT PEANUT 
BUTTER makes fine sand- 
wiches. Carry some along with 
you on your next hike. Smooth 
and fine. All good scouts like 
Beech-Nut. 



©1920 B-N.P.Co. 



WHEN a feller wants real 
jam or jelly, he wants 
Beech-Nut. For Beech-Nut has 
all the flavor and satisfaction that 
can possibly be packed into every 
jar. Each one has a home-made 
taste, with real flavor of the fruit. 
Try a jar of your favorite — 
spread it thick on a slice of bread. 
The first bite tells the tale. 

Your grocer probably carries 
Beech - Nut Jams and Jellies. 
Order a trial jar. 



BEECH-NUT PACKING COMPANY 
Canajoharie, N. Y. 

"Foods of Finest Flavor 



Plants at Canajoharie 
and Rochester, N. Y. 



Beech-Nut 

Jams and Jellie 



Jams 

Blackberry 
Loganberry 
Red Raspberry 
Damson Plum 
Peach 
Strawberry 



Jellies 

Apple ( Spitzenburg) 

Crabapple 

Quince 

Black Currant 

Grape 

Red Currant 



Marmalades 

Orange 
Grapefruit 

Preserves 

Cherry 
Pineapple 




#MoyirsTo NE 




A Free Book Descriptive of 
Yellowstone National Park 

Write for your copy now 



AN easy-chair route through 
XV the Wonderland of America 
— description of Yellowstone Park, 
richly illustrated. Contains maps, 
minute details regarding mud vol- 
canoes, tinted pools, painted ter- 
races, 20-mile-long Yellowstone 
Lake, canyons, cataracts, bears, 
bisons, deer, beavers and other 
animals. Accurate information as 
to hotels, camps, transportation, 
what to wear — everything you 
want to know about Geyserland. 

Tells how, for price of round 
trip ticket to Yellowstone Park, 
you can make a "circle tour" to 
Yellowstone, returning by way of 
Denver. (Rocky Mountain Na- 
tional-Estes Park is conveniently 
reached by inexpensive side trip.) 
See map below. All on a Burling- 
ton-Northern Pacific Planned 
Vacation. 

A real vacation — planned to 
take you into Yellowstone Park 
through the famous Gardiner 



Gateway, past Paradise Valley, 
Emigrant Peak, the Devil's Slide 
and Sepulcher Mountain; then 
out via motor over the Cody 
Road, named for Col. Wm F 
Cody ("Buffalo Bill"), over the 
mountains, around charming Syl- 
van Lake, past the tremendous 
Government irrigation dam, 
higher than the New York Flat- 
iron Building, through bold and 
rugged Shoshone Canyon— "The 
most wonderful 90 miles in Amer- 
ica." Then through Cheyenne 
to Loveland, Colorado (stop-over 
point for the side trip to Rocky 
Mountain-Estes Park). Continue 
on to Denver by motor or rail, 
where side trips to Denver's 
Mountain Parks, Colorado Gla- 
ciers, Grand Lake, the Pike's 
Peak region, Mesa Verde Na- 
tional Park, and other scenically 
famous places await the taking. 

All — in connection with your 
trip to Yellowstone. 




Old Faithful Geyser 

P. S. EUSTIS 
Passenger Traffic Manager 
C. B. & Q- R.R., Chicago 

A. M. CLELAND 
Passenger Traffic Manager 
Northern Pacific Railway 
St. Paul, Minn. 



Burlington -Northern Pacific Planned Vacations 



Three grcal wonder s pots— Yellowstone Park, Rocky Mountain— Estes— Park, and Denver all 

IT ~" 



on one circle trip 




■ 




The(onverse 



*6 



Big Nine 



"It was the last half of the ninth 
— score 4-3 — two men out — 
Jimmy was on second and Herb 
on third. Then, with two strikes 
on him Perky singles over the 
short-stop's head. It was up to 
Jimmy ! He shoots around third 
like he had wings on his feet — 
beats the left fielder's throw 
home and lands safe in a cloud 
of dust. Pretty slick!" 



It was up to Jimmy— 

Big Nines gave Jimmy speed. The rugged soles of these sturdy shoes 
are packed with life ! 

Big Nines are light because they are perfectly balanced. The thick soles 
are made of rubber tough as hickory and with a non-skid design that 
gives you the sure-footedness of a cat. Real horse-hide ankle patches 
and trimmings add to their life and good looks, and every seam is double- 
stitched. Cork innersoles keep your feet cool and comfortable. 

Comfort, wear and looks are built right into Big Nines. For sports, 
hiking or school wear they are just the shoes that a live boy needs. 
They don't cost any more than just ordinary sport shoes and far less 
than leather shoes. Tell that to your parents. 

When you buy your Big Nines look for the Big "C" on the sole. It's 
important. If they don't have the Big "C" they are not Big Nines. 
If your dealer doesn't carry them, write direct, sending your size. 

Converse Rubber Shoe 
Company 

Factory: MALDEN, MASS. 

Service Branches : 
New York — 142 Duane Street 
Chicago — 618-626 W. Jackson Boulevard 





After a long hike — 

muscles lame, feet tired and 
aching, rub in a few drops of 
Absorbine, Jr. It's great— takes 
out the kinks in jig time. 



Absorb ineJ? 

THE ANTISEPTIC LINIMENT 



always makes a hit with real 
boys — they don't want to be 
laid up if it can be avoided. 

Prominent athletes and train- 
ers everywhere use this remark- 
able liniment to keep fit and to 
help them win. It puts "pep" 
into jaded muscles — stops pain 

— heals cuts and wounds. 

And you will like the way 

Absorbine, Jr., acts — quickly and 

pleasantly. It isn't greasy, and 

has an agreeable odor. 

Get acquainted with 

Absorbine, Jr., today. ■ 



$1.25 a bottle at most 
druggists. Liberal 
trial bottle mailed for 
10 cents in stamps. 



W. F. YOUNG, Inc. 

360 Temple Street 

Springfield, Mass. 





They Look So Nice 
And Wear So Well 

I "'HAT'S the important thing, for mothers of 
1 romping, playing boys and girls, to know 
about Holeproof Hosiery. 

It fits well, looks well, and saves darning. Special- 
ized knitting methods and selected strong yarns 
are the reason. 

You can get them in any weight and all styles. 
And for men and women, too, in pure silk, silk- 
faced and lusterized lisle. 

Ask for them by name and identify them by the 
label. On sale at leading stores everywhere. 

HOLEPROOF HOSIERY CO. 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

Holeproof Hosiery Co. of Canada, Limited, London, Ont. 
Holeproof Hosiery Co., 50 York Street, Sydney, Australia 



HOLEPRePF 
He/IER/ - 



From Negative 
made with a 

No. 3d Special 
KODAK 

Kxart Size 




THE KODAK ALBUM is more than just a record; 
it's a joy book, an intimate story of the home, a book 
of humor and human interest. To-day it is full of 
charm; to-morrow, when the children have outgrown 
childhood, it will be priceless. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY, Rochester, N. Y., The Kodak City. 



The 
Most 



Interesting 
Event 



of 



America's 
Magazine 
World 



in the 
Last 



Twenty 



ears 



The May 

CENTURY 

TTAVE YOU SEEN IT ? Be sure that this issue is 
A not exhausted before you secure a copy It has 
a special interest, one might almost say, historical. 

For one of America's oldest and finest magazines about 
which associations with the best in American letters 
are richly gathered, has— next in succession in that line 
which included G. J. Holland, Richard Watson Gilder 
Robert Underwood Johnson — a new editor, Glenn 
r rank. 

This new editor is as significant of our times as were 
his predecessors of their time. His interest is primarily 
in the affairs, the opinions, the achievements, of his own 
day. He is a brilliant lecturer, the author of books on 
social and political problems. 

He has been for two years an associate editor of The 
Century, writing the "Tide of Affairs" department, 
which he will continue. He intends to make each issue 
of The Century of the freshest, most vital interest to 
people who wish to know what their world today is 
thinking, and to read the best fiction that is written 
today. 

The May issue will contain other important changes 
1 he magazine is permanently enlarged by sixteen pages 
of reading matter; printed in a larger type, more openly 
set. The cover is to be henceforth of a new and hand- 
some material like fine leather and extremely durable. 

If ever you Could afford not to see The 

Century every month, you Cannot now! T 



THE CENTURY CO. 



{ Concord, N. H.; or 

(353 Fourth Avenue, New York City: 



S.N. 5-21 



Enclosed please find 555.00, for which send The Century for one year, beginni 



ng with the 



.issue, to 



YOUR TEETH were not made for this kind of use; but luckily 
Nature makes them strong enough to bear your weight. 
To keep strong, sound teeth, you must give them daily care, 
always guarding them faithfully. 

Colgate's Ribbon Dental Cream keeps teeth clean, and it is 
safe. There are no harmful acids in Colgate's; it has no harsh 
grit, no druggy taste, but a delicious flavor which makes it a 
pleasure to use Colgate's night and morning. 

For sale everywhere— or generous trial tube sent for 2c in stamps. 

COLGATE & CO. 
Dept. 60 
199 Fulton Street, New York 





More dentists recommend 
Colgate's than any other dentifrice 




Unless stamped 
like this it is not 
an Educator. 

Listen to 

Mr. X-Ray's Story: 

HE says he's been looking at the foot 
bones of a lot of people lately. 
And he has found many twisted and bent 
as in the first picture — and some straight 
and healthy — as in the other picture. 

Shoes make all that difference. Narrow, 
pointed shoes make twisted feet. Educa- 
tor Shoes — that "let the feet grow as they 
should" — make straight, healthy ones. 

You don't want sick feet — with corns, 
bunions, ingrowing nails, and fallen 
arches — do you? Then ask mother to 
get you Educators. 

Send for a free book— "Bent Bones Make Frantic 
Feet —that tells Mr. X-Ray's story. 

Rice&Hutchins,Inc.,17HighSt.,Boston,Mass. 

El RICE & HUTCHINS 

DUCATOR 




FOR MEN, WOMEN, and CHILDREN 




Children's Clothes in a Jiffy 



These smart romper suits were made very quieklv 
with Wright's E-Z Trim, which is your old favor- 
ite Wright s Bias Fold Tape stitched in parallel 
rows on fast colored percale, all readv tolsew on, 
tor middy blouses, sailor suits, etc. 



SIGHT S BIAS 



m the usual form or as E-Z Trim is a great help in 
children s clothes. S«nd for our large booklet willi new 
for dresses, boys' suits, rompers, aprons, etc 
Also for blouses, lingerie and fancy work. 
Send for our free 3-yard sample of tape in fast 
colored percale in any one of the following 
colors: Gray, Pink, Light Blue, Brown, Reseda 
£avy, Lavender, Linen Color, Old Rose, Alice 
Blue. Red, Black. 

WM. E. WRIGHT & SONS CO., Mfrs 
Dept. S-2, 315 Church St.,'|New York 




Live 
Outdoors! 

"Y\/" E believe so thoroughly in the great 
tonic of sunshine and fresh air, that 
we take this opportunity to urge upon 
parents the use of St. Nicholas Camp 
Department — the Gateway to a summer 
in the open for boys and girls. <I Years of 
experience with summer camps qualify our 
Camp Service Department to give intelli- 
gent information. <I Inquiries receive our 
most careful attention. We try to fit camps 
to your individual requirements. It will be 
a privilege for us to assist you in your 
selection of a camp. 

Address 

St. Nicholas Camp Service Department 

St. Nicholas Magazine 
353 Fourth Avenue New York City 




Always 
in time 
for a game 



A fellow doesn't know 

what real fun is — until 

he gets a good bicycle, 
i 

Then he can go anywhere, 
anytime — get to the ball 
field in time for a game, go on long 
trips through the country, visit 
friends in other towns, do errands 
and earn spare-time money — there's 
always something doing. 

No trouble or expense. Iver John- 
son Bicycles are built to give long, 
steady service under the roughest 
conditions. 

Iver Johnson Juvenile Bicycles em- 
body Iver Johnson adult construc- 
tion throughout. Seamless steel 
tubing; drop forged parts; two-piece 
crank set; perfect two-point bearings, 
both cones on one axle, always in 
alignment ; superb enamel and nickel 
finish ; and the best equipment make 
Iver Johnson the King of Bicycles. 
Unbeatable for good looks, easy rid- 
ing, speed, strength, and durability. 



Iver Johnson Juvenile Bicycles 
$47.50 to $52.50 

(No extra charge for Coaster Brake) 
Other models $60 up. Write today for 
free bicycle catalog "B" 



IVER JOHNSON'S ARMS & CYCLE WORKS 
358 River Street, Fitchburg, Mass. 

99 Chambers St., New York 717 Market St., San Francisco 

IVER JOHNSON 
BICYCLES 





Welch's -t 

_ rapela 

the pureMTgrape spread 



j 




WELCH'S Grapelade is a 
lesson in real goodness — 
the goodness of the flavor of 
grapes. Grapelade is all grapes 
— all their juice and richness, 
and color. It is smooth and 
pure. Seeds and skins are re- 
moved and acid crystals taken 
out by our patented process. 
Grapelade spread on bread or 
toast is a joy to the eye and a de- 
light to the taste. 

And Mother is glad to make 
Grapelade sandwiches. She 
knows nothing could be more 
wholesome and nourishing. 

Grapelade comes in 15 oz. 
glass jars and 7 oz. tumblers. 
Leading grocers also have 
other Welch Lades. Peach- 
lade, Plumlade, Cherrilade, 
Straivberilade, Fruitlade 
(Grape-Raspberry) , Cur- 
rantlade ,andBlackberilade. 
All in 15 oz. glass jars. 

Trie Welch Grape Juice Company, 
Westfield.ATlT 




ST. NICHOLAS STAMP PAGE 

Conducted by Samuel R. Simmons 



NEW JAPANESE STAMPS 

Some time ago one of our readers from California sent 
us the first copy we had seen of the new Japanese stamp 
used to commemorate the taking of the census. At that 
time, space did not permit us to illustrate the stamp. 
We do this now. The design is simple and pleasing. 
We know of no other stamp which at all resembles it. 
There are only two stamps in the issue. In the center 
is a figure seated in a chair, his left foot resting upon his 
right knee. In the upper left corner of the central de- 
sign is the Imperial Chrysanthemum, with the regula- 
tion sixteen petals. (A genuine Japanese stamp always 
has sixteen petals in the chrysanthemum; a stamp show- 
ing more than sixteen, or less, is a counterfeit.) We do 




japan's "census" stamp and "the emperor's shrine" 



not know the translation of the inscription at the sides 
of the design. In very fine type at the bottom of the 
right column is the figure of value, 15 sen on the purple, 
3 sen on the carmine stamps. We also illustrate what 
we think is one of the dearest little stamps ever issued. 
It is called "The Emperor's Shrine," and pictures a 
small Japanese temple in a grove of pine-trees. There 
are two values in this issue also, carmine and purple. 
The design is so dainty and delicate that no illustration 
can do justice to it. It needs the clearness and coloring 
of the original to bring out the beauty of it all. But 
we know every reader of Stamp Page will be indeed 
pleased when he becomes the owner of one of these 
stamps. And we think the girls will admire it even 
more than the boys. 

ANSWERS TO QUERIES 

We have been surprised at the number of letters 
which have come'to us asking for information of one 
kind or another about the Pilgrim Stamps. Not a few 
have written to call our attention to the fact that the 
words "United States Postage" do not appear upon the 
stamps. One and all they seem to think that this is an 
"error" — that ever-fascinating thing to the stamp- 
collector. In this we do not agree with them. So far 
as we know, there is nothing in the laws of our country 
which makes the insertion of these words upon its 
postage-stamps obligatory. Certainly there is nothing 
in international law. No name has ever appeared 
upon any of the stamps of Great Britain. While the 
present agitation in Ireland may suggest to us a good 
reason for the omission, the stamps are legal without it. 
And so is this Pilgrim issue of ours. We do not think 
there is any idea of a change to remedy the omission. 
A change would certainly mean entirely new designs, 



lor the present ones are already severely criticized for 
"overcrowding." With varieties of minor importance, 
come three other questions regarding this issue: How- 
many are there in the set? Where may they be obtained ? 
Why are they not used exclusively instead of stamps of 
the old designs? There are three stamps in the set — 
one cent, green; two cent, carmine; and five cent, blue. 
These stamps may be purchased at any of the larger 
post-offices throughout the United States, and doubtless 
also at many of the smaller ones. But those who desire 
the Pilgrim stamps must ask specifically for them. ' If 
one goes to any post-office and asks for stamps, he will 
be given those of the regular issue, not the commemora- 
tive Pilgrim issue. One reason, perhaps the main rea- 
son, is that the Pilgrim stamps are printed in sheets of 
seventy, instead of one hundred as are the regular 
stamps. It is therefore much easier for the postal 
clerk to keep account with the old kind; so unless he is 
asked for the other, he passes out the regular issue. 
This is probably one of the reasons why more of the 
"Pilgrims" are not seen upon letters. It saves time for 
both the postal clerks and the senders of letters to use 
the old kind of stamps. If any of our readers are not 
able to get the Pilgrim stamps from their own post- 
offices, they can easily obtain a well-centered, carefully- 
selected set from their favorite stamp-dealer, who will 
gladly help them out at a small premium over the face 
value. Next time you write to your dealer, why not 
ask him what he will charge you for a set in perfect 
condition. In some ways this is the wisest course, 
because not all the postal clerks, even if they have the 
stamps, will take the time to pick out a good set — a set 
good enough to please the critical stamp-collector. 
Iflf our readers will look in any large atlas, they will 
find, snuggled down in the Pyrenees Mountains between 
France and Spain, one of the smallest of the many 
nations of the world. It is the tiny Republic of Andorra. 
Every now and then one of our stamp-collecting readers 
writes us asking what kind of stamps are used in Andorra; 
there is no place for such stamps in his album, no men- 
tion of them in his catalogue. Why not? he asks. 
Andorra has no stamps of its own. It is really too 
small for such important things as stamps. It does not 
send out very many letters at best. What it does send 
out are divided into two piles, those going south into 
Spain, those going north into France or beyond. One 
portion is taken by carriers into some Spanish post-office 
and there franked with Spanish stamps to its destina- 
tion; the other is taken to a French post-office and 
receives French stamps. Ifln another article on this 
page we describe two stamps of Japan. There will be 
many of our readers who will wish to own these stamps, 
but we wish to say again that St. Nicholas does not 
have these nor any other stamps for sale. Nor do we 
know which of our advertisers in the Stamp Directory 
may happen to have them, nor the price which is asked 
for them. For such information we must refer each of 
our readers to the St. Nicholas Stamp Directory. 
Look over the lists of advertisements that appear there. 
Pick out two or three of those which appeal to you most 
and write to the dealers for the information you desire 
about price. Do not forget to enclose a self-addressed 
stamped envelop for reply. After a little while, each 
reader will find some one whom he will install as his 
favorite dealer, and from whom he will be able to pro- 
cure most of the stamps he may wish to purchase. 



THE ST. NICHOLAS STAMP DIRECTORY 

is really a Ust of reliable Stamp Dealers. These people have studied stamps for years, perhaps they helped 
your father and mother when they first started their stamp collections. Sr. Nicholas knows that these dealers 
are trustworthy. When writing to them be sure to give your full name and address, and as reference the name 
of your parent, or teacher, or employer, whose permission must be obtained first. It is well also to mention 
St. Nicholas Magazine. Remember, we are always glad to assist you, so write to us for any information that 
will help you solve your stamp problems. 



WORI H\ I ARrPST Wholesale and Ketail Catalogue of 
TtvALU O LftlVULOl Postage Stamps now reaiy. 128 pages. 
Whether you are a dealer or collector you need it. Single stamps, 
sets, packets, albums, supplies, etc. Price 10c. Worth $$ to you. 
MonlMv firrillar ° f new arrivale - Price changes, etc. One 
lUUIIUUjr VlltUlal year for 35c and your choice of any one of 
the following premiums: *17 Belgium Parcel Post Cat. 55c; 30 
diff . French Colonies; 30 diff. Portugal and Colonies or 40 diff. 
new Europe. Premiums worth 35c alone. Remit in stamps. 

MARKS STAMP CO., Dep't. N, TORONTO, CANADA 

BARGAINS FOR APPROVAL APPLICANTS 

35 Var. Pictorial Postage Stamps, price 15c. 15 Var. War 
Stamps, price 10c. 10 Var. Bulgarian, price 25c. 100 Var. 
U. S. and For., price 15c, or send me 50c. and I will send all 
four packets. W. J. ZINK, 4607 Dtnison Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. 


Scott's Standard Postage Stamp Catalogue 

1920 Edition 

Every Collector should possess one of these catalogues as it contains 
complete information and value of every stamp issued by any gov- 
ernment in the world. 

Prices 

CLOTH COVER $1.50 

CLOTH COVER WITH THUMB INDEX, 2.00 
Forwarding Charges Extra Shipping Weight, 2 lbs. 

SCOTT STAMP & COIN COMPANY 

33 West 44th Street NEW YORK CITY 
xSS^Jv 1 CO Genuine Foreign Stamps — Mexico War issues, 


BONANZA BARGAIN OFFER 

51 diff. stamps, also packet 5 unused, China ship set, 2 scarce 
animal stamps, large $1.00 U. S. revenue, perforation gauge, 
millimetre scale, r\iler and price lists. All for 9c ! Finest 
approvals; British Colonies, etc., large discounts. Fennell 
Stamp Co., Dept. S, Fullerton Bldg., St. Louis, Mo. 

TOAIX APPLICANTS FOR APPROVAL SHEETS WE OFFER 1 16 VARIETIES — 
All Foreign Postage Stamps. Including at least 25 varieties War Stamps. 

4«h Note the following countries represented — Austria, Argen- 
§ ■ ■ 1. tine, AustralianCnm., Bavaria surcharge, Belgium. Brazil, 
mm my Chile, Canada, China, Cuba, Czecho-Slovakia, Cameroons, 

#11 Eatnonia . Egypt, France, Jugo-Slavia, Latvija, Hungary. 
# II Schleswig, TJkrainia — Commemoratives, Peace, War Tax, 
mm \r Plebiscite, Surcharges, etc. A pocket album, packet 
hinges, perforation gauge and millimeter scale, listB of sets, packets 
and supplies free. LAKEVIEW STAMPCO., 2503 E. 86lh St., Cleveland. 0. 

55 ALL DIFFERENT STAMPS 

including China, Japan, French Colonies, etc., given to 
applicants for our high grade approval selections. Send 
references and 2c stamp to the EDGEWOOD STAMP 
CO., Dept. S, Milford, Connecticut. 

CM A DC 150 different foreign, 18c. 60 different U. S. in- 
iJllririJ eluding $1 and $2 revenues, for 12c. With each 
order we give free our pamphlet which tells " How to Make a Col- 
lection Properly." QUEEN CITY STAMP AND COIN CO., 
Room 32, 604 Race St., Cincinnati, 0. 

TO ALL APPLICANTS FOR APPROVAL SHEETS WE OFFER 

SPECIAL HOLIDAY OFFER 

All For 1 Pack. "Cleveland" hinges, 1 Pocket Album, 1 Perf. 
^ g± Gauge, 4 Spanish War Revs., 6 TJ. 8. Envelopes cut sq. 

inc. Columbian issue, 5 Civil War Revs. , 5 Scenery Stamps 
lUi, CROWELL STAMP CO., Cleveland, Ohio 

Why my approvals are the best: (1) No trash. (2) Lowest 
price: 50 per cent, with extra discounts for quick returns. (3) Attrac- 
tive Sheets arranged by countries. (4) War stamps and Late issues 
at Moderate Net Prices. (5) Prompt Service. Hundreds 
of St. Nicholas boys have tried them. Why not YOU ? 

I>. M. Ward. 608 Buchanan St., Gary, Ihd. 


Venezuela, Salvador and IndiaService, 1 A_ 

HS jA] Guatemala, China, eic. Only IWC 

WBt 9Ml Finest Approval Sheets 50 to 60%. Agents Wanted. Big 
VXgSK' 72-page Lists Free. We buy Stamps. Estab. 25yrs 
— Hussman Stamp Co., Dept . 52, St. Louis, Mo. 


CDCC s t anl P s an< ' f° ur issues of our weekly 
w* W\F,F, paper STAMPLETS to approval applicants. 
* Rt'NKE STAMP CO., 1858 E. 90lh St., Cleveland, Ohln 


All For TO ALL APPLICANTS FOR APPROVAL SHEETS WE OFFER 
1 £ 1 Blank Stamp Album; Packet Faultless Hinges; 1 set 
III/* - Honduras, 2 var., nnused ; 1 set Nicaragua, 2 var., unused ; 
* ( 1 6et French Colonies, 2 var., large; 1 perforation gauge. 

OHIO STAMP CO., Cleveland, Ohio 


STAMPS— 20 VARIETIES, UNUSED, FREE to all send- 
ing for our approval sheets at 50% discount. Postage 2 cents. 
Mention St. Nicholas. Quaker Stamp Co., Toledo, Ohio. 


f^T^ 4 14 /IT'lC* 1 ^OnHHiff RritUh fliiinnii Cnha China TnHia 
1 a \J I - ' ' ' 'iiii. 1 > 1 1 1 1> n 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 , t . ' uii.i, » iijn.t. inula, 

^ * AlVlr w S Jamaica, Japan, Portugal, Venezuela, etc., onlv 

10c! 100 all diff. 15c! 1000 all diff., fine collection in itself, $5.00; 

100 diff. U. S., 30c; 1000 hinges, 10c. Agents wtd. 50% com. 

List free. I buy stamps. L. B. Dover, Longmont, Colo. 


Stamps 50 all diff., Transvaal, Brazil, Peru, Cuba, Jflfllk. 
Mexico, Ceylon, Java, etc., and Album, 10c. 1000 ErS^HBl 
Finely Mixed, 40c. 50 din. U. Z5c. 1000 hinges, Ejft^flB 
10c. Agts. wtd., 50%. List Free. I buy stamps. BBJbI 
C. Stegman, 5940 Cote Brilliante Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 


Mekeels' 64-page illustrated Stamp Journal is uow 

THE ALBEMARLE STAMP COLLECTOR 

15c a copy. $1.25 per year. Approval selection of War Stamps of 
Europe and others to those who are entitled to credit. 

ALBEMARLE STAMP CO., Bethlehem, Pa. 


). n ..,.,| QU/w»fo. 50% Discount. Sent anywhere 

Approval Sheets: St . n k -„olas goes. 

Frederick B. Driver, Doylestown, Pa. 


TO ALL APPLICANTS FOR APPROVAL SHEETS WE OFFER All For 

SPECIAL SEASON OPENER— ) 1A 

8 Animal Stamps; 5 N. Y. State Revs.; 20 varieties IT, S. f 1 XjQ. 
Postage, old andnew;Album; Packet "ClevelancT'hinges. J 

THE CLEVELAND STAMP CO. 
324 Caxton Building Cleveland, Ohio 


All fnr 8 />antc 20 different stamps from 20 different 
rtll lOr O CCIIUJ Countries. 10 unused, 2 Malay (Tigers) , 
all different. FOYE STAMP COMPANY, Detroit, Mich. 


CDLT H| AWATHA PACKET NO. 1 for name, address, 2 

H IXaLilj c °U ec ' ors , 2c postage, asking for quality apprs. Ref. 
* *»* J *^ please. Hiawatha Stamp Shop, Syracuse, N. Y. 


BARGAINS EA,H set 5 i:ENTS 

U.rtIXV_»./"H lio 4 Malay: 8 Finland: 20 Sweden; 8 Hondu- 
ras; SCosta Rica; 10 Porto Rico; 8 Dutch Indies ; 6 Hayti. Lists 
of 7000 low-priced stamps free. 

Chambers Stamp Co., ill G Nassau Street, New York City 

CDFC 5 unused French Colonies to Approval Appli- 
T IALiEi ran,s - ROESSLER'S Stamp NEWS, 6 mos. 15c. 

Edwin H. Bailey, Box 25, Farmingdale, N. Y. 

All DifFer^nt 200 ' 300 , 50c: 500, $1.25; looo, S3. 50. 
rtli l/uicicut F. L. Onken. 6ao 79th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 


nAWTYY PACKET STAMPS free for name, address 3 col- 
Ut\\.\U 1 lectors, 2c postage, with 50% apprs. 125 dif. 
U. S. inc. high values. 50c. U. T. K. Stamp Co., Utica, N. Y. 


MEKEEL'S STAMP WEEKLY, Beverly, Mass., the 
only U. S. Stamp Weekly. 12 large pps. 3 mos. only 25c. 
§3?" A nice stamp packet Free to every new subscriber. 


r" r* 7 beautiful French Colonials, to approval appli- 
r IxEjUi cants. Frank Hadley, Box 73, Plainfield, N. J. 


Newfoundland Dncr 12c blacl[ . f ree with every application 
liemuuuuidllU l/Og, for trial selection of mv One, Two and 
Five cent approvals. H. E. Codwise. Melrose Highlands, Mass. 

1000 DIFFERENT STAMPS $3.00; 500. $1.25; 200,25c; 100. 12c. 
Approvals. MICHAELS, 5002 Prairie, Chicago, 111. 


DA RC 4IN Collectors duplicates. Catalog, lc to 75c each ; 100 dif - 
DttnunUl ferent. price 50r. Barker. 1 Wldmor St., Toronto. Canada 


Genuine Postage Stamps on approval. Reference please. 
Hub Postage Stamp Co., 345 Washington St., Boston 9, Mass. 
(Continued on next page) 




First Aid for Guts 

Apply "Vaseline" Carbolated Petroleum 
Jelly. It relieves pain, prevents infection and 
hastens healing-. A mild antiseptic dressing 
for cuts, scratches and other household emer- 
gencies. Sold at all druggists, and general 
stores. In sanitary tin tubes or glass bottles. 

CHESEBROUCH MANUFACTURING COMPANY 
17 State Street (Consolidated) New ^ 

^seline 

Reg-US. Pat. Off 

CARBOLATED 

PETROLEUM JELLY 

For Cuts and Burns 



How to Wigwag 

YOU can talk to your chum or your brother two or three blocks 
away in plain view of everybody and only those who know 
how to wigwag will know what you are saying. The Honor 
Bright Boys' Handbook will tell you just how to do it — how our 
brave soldiers and sailors in the United States Army and Navy do 
it. And that isn't all. For the Honor Bright Boys' Handbook 
will teach you almost everything boys want to know. Khaki 
covered. It tells you how to make a box kite, how to trap rabbits 
without injuring them, how to make a tent, how to build a boat, 
how to blaze a trail, how to build a cabin — and many other things. 

This Handy Boys' Handbook — Free 

Just send us six tags from Honor Bright Boys' Blouses or Shirts 
and you get this book without its costing you one penny. Talk 
it over with your chum and then start collecting Honor Bright 
Tags. Fill out the coupon below, mail to us, and we will send 
you one tag to begin the collection. Then show this advertise- 
ment to your parents and ask them to please see what really fine 
shirts and waists these are the next time they are in the store 
where they buy your clothes. 

Honor Bright Boys' Blouses, Shirts and Playsuits 

They are good looking, not expensive, fit well and are strongly 
made, will stand lots of hard wear and washing. And you get a 
tag on every one. 

RELIANCE MANUFACTURING COMPANY 
212 WEST MONROE STREET 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



Dept. 5. Reliance Manufacturing Company 
212 West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois 

Please send me the free tag you promised in your advertisement 
as I wish to save tags and get a free copy of the Honor Bright 
Boys' Handbook. 

Mother buys my clothes at 

Do they sell Honor Bright blouses and shirts?-- - -- 

Name 

Town - State 




Dodson Wren y 

if^'jL Beautify Your Grounds with 
\ Dodson Bird Houses-, 

h They never fail to attract the song birds (in- 
sectivorous birds) who in tarn destroy nox- 
ious insects. The valuable purple martin 

' will catch and consume on an average of 2,000 
mosqultos a day. besides other annoying in- 
sects: the song birds will protect your trees, 
shrubs and gardens from insects and their 
beauty and son? will bring joy udbapplneas. 
Mr. Dodson has spent thirty years of loving study 
of the song birds, their habits, and how to attract 
"iem to beautiful "Bird Lodge", his home on the 
Kankakee River. Dodson Bird Houses are aper- 
manent investment; they will last a lifetime; 
built of thoroughly seasoned Oak. Cypress, 
Selected White Pine and Red Cedar: coated nails 
and the best lead and oil are used for their pro- 
tection against the elements. Built under Mr. 
Dodson ' a personal supervision. 
ORDER NOW-Frae Book "Your Bird Friends and How 
to Win Them", sent on request illustrating Dodson line 
and giving prices; free also a beautiful colored bird 
picture worthy of framing. 

Josenh H DnfliAn President American Audubon Auociation 
rfowpn n, UOOSOn 707 Harrison Ave. Kankak««, III. 

Dodson Sparrow Trav guaranteed to rid your community 

of theee Quarrelsome peets, price tS.OO. 



[ 



QADays'FreeTrial 

Select from 44 Styles, colors and 
sizes, famous Ranger bicycles. De- 
livered free on approval, from maker-direct-to- 
rider, at Facto ry Prices. Save $10 to $25 on you r bicycle. 

12 Months to Pay E3Sl% ■SS 

liberal Easy Payment plan. Parents of ten 
advance first deposit. Energetic boys earn the 
small monthly payments thereafter. 

Horns, wheels, lamps, parts and 
AlllH~ik7 equipment at half usual 
SEND NO MONEY — Ask for big free 
Catalog, marvelous prices and terms. 



rices, 
ger 



TVfFlA FI CYCLE COMPANY 

<n»\mu£%.m\r Dept. MI5, Chicago. III. 




Special 
offer to 
Rider 
Agents 



ROCHE'S/ EMBROCATION 

RELIEVES SAFELY and PROMPTLY 




Also wonderfully effective 
in Bronchitis, Lumbago 
and Rheumatism. 

All druggists or 

SonZ*Bnlltnd N E. FOUGERA ACO. 

London. England g0 _ 92 Beekman st N y. 



AIREDALES— THE PERFECT DOG 

Wonderful pets and affectionate companions. The best pal a 
boy or girl can have. A trustworthy and loyal friend. 
SHERB^AIN KENNELS 



E. LeRoy Brainerd, Owner. 



Box 644, Portland, Conn. 



STAMPS 

(Continued from preceding page) 

FRFF PRFMII IlVm 10 Approval Applicants. One-half 
1 1\LL r 1\L.1V11U1V10 cen , up A | S0 higher p r i r . e d, 

.VJ Stegman Street, Jersey City, New Jersey. 



CHARLES L. BIRDSALL. 



H I N GE S — Best — 1000 for 15 ccnts - Be sure to s ct 

"them. Packet, 100 diff. stamps, 20 cents. 
C. F. Richards, Box 77. Grand Central P.O. New York 



FREE 



FREE 



• r ) unused Ukrainia to Approval Applicants. 
Reference. Mortimer Fowler, Jr., 

368 Washington Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

12 DIFFERENT unused LIBERIA, BULGARIA pictures, etc., 18c 
R. H. A. Green, 636 Hinman Ave., Evanston, 111. 
__ 2 GERMAN AEROPLANE STAMPS 

to approval applicants. Reference required. 
J. R. Nichols, 2322 Loring PI., New York City. 



STAMPS 105 China, etc.. stamp dictionary, list 3000 bargains, 
2c. Album (500 pictures), 3c. Bullard& Co., Sta. A, Boston 



COLOR 

Everyone likes to draw in colors 

"Crayola" Crayons are the best for 
coloring maps, outline pictures, etc. 



Eight in box for ioc. 

Red, Orange, Green, Yellow, 
Blue, Violet, Brown 
and Black 



"CRAYOLA" 

Colored 
Drawing 
Crayons 
for School 
and Home 




Sold by all dealers 

BINNEY & SMITH CO. 

81 Fulton Street, New York City 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



-IN- 



ST. NICHOLAS 



ALWAYS INDICATE 



Quality 



"TV TO man is going to place his 
^ name or his trademark on 
the product he manufactures 
unless he has reason to know 
that his goods are just a little 
better than unidentified prod- 
ucts. You can depend on the 
quality of the goods advertised 
in these pages. 



SPALDING 
for Sport 

Spalding Quality 

is conceded superior by 
those who have had ex- 
perience, and the boy 
who is taking up base ball 
or tennis— or any other 
athletic sport— should 
start right. His enjoy- 
ment — his best efforts, 
will be multiplied when 
he uses Spalding equip- 
ment. Spalding Quality 
insures Satisfaction. 

Spalding's "Base Ball for Beginners." . Price 10 Cents. 

How to Bat 25 Cents. 

How to Pitch, 25 Cents. How to Catch, 25 Cents. 
How to Play the Infield and Outfield. ... 25 Cents. 
Spalding's Base Ball Guide 25 Cents. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

NEW YORK CHICAGO SAN FRANCISCO 
BOSTON PHILADEPHIA 

Stores in all principal cities of the United States 





BOYS 

PLAY GOLF! 



Learn to play a man's game 
now. No other game has the 
same fascination. Learn to play it 
while young — and play better and 
enjoy it more all your life. 

EASY TO LEARN WHILE YOUNG 

Just use the coupon below and we will send you 
our FREE new book for boys. It tells you how 
boys elsewhere are having a lot of fun playing 
the grand old "Ancient Game." 



Golf Clubs have been the standard 
of quality with Golfers for over 
twenty years. 

"Make Records with MACGREGORS" 
THE 



, CANBY CO. 



The 
Crawford, 
McGregor & 
Canby Co., 

Dept. 3* Dayton, Ohio 

Please send free information 
and booklet 
"How Boys Can Enjoy Golf" 



City. 



State. 



To Make a House a Home 



LIGHTING THE HOME 

By M. LUCKIESH 

AN extraordinary book opening up an entirely new field in interior decorat- 
•r mg " i author sa y s in hi s preface: "Complete control over the dis- 
tribution and quality of light is possible. The former provides the 'values' 
and the latter the drapery of color. 'Painting with light' is not merely a 
metaphorical phrase; it is accomplished by the lighting artist. If the house- 
holder will consider lighting as seriously as he does decoration and furnishing 
he will find artificial light a controllable, convenient, inexpensive, mobile 
medium— a powerful ally in making a house a home." Illustrated $2 00 



THE HOUSE 
IN GOOD TASTE 

By Elsie DeWolfe 

A beautifully made and 
profusely illustrated book 
that has become a classic 
on the subject of interior 
decorating and arrange- 
ment. The author, a rec- 
ognized authority in her 
field, is as conservative as 
she is entertaining. 

Illustrated. $4.00 



EARLY AMERICAN 
CRAFTSMANSHIP 

By Walter A. Dyer 

A highly interesting 
survey of the lives and 
work of our American Old 
Masters in architecture, 
carving, cabinet-making, 
glassware, pewter, pottery, 
etc. — artists of surprising 
distinction whose careers 
have been too little 
appreciated in their own 
country. 

Over 100 Illustrations. $4.00 



THE PLEASURES 
OF COLLECTING 

By Gardner Teall 

This book is packed 
with expert information 
which should be extreme- 
ly valuable to that con- 
stantly increasing circle 
interested in the realm 
of antiques American, 
European and Oriental. 
Written with spontaneous 
enthusiasm, richness of al- 
lusion, and intimate charm. 

Many illustrations. $4.00 



BY-PATHS 
IN COLLECTING 

By Virginia Robie 

This beautifully made 
book contains a wealth of 
reliable information about 
rare and unusual things 
which have passed the 
century mark — old china, 
pewter, copper, brass, 
samplers, band-boxes, sun- 
dials, and kindred fasci- 
nating objects. 

Profusely illustrated. $4.00 



THE LURE OF THE 
ANTIQUE 

By Walter A. Dyer 

An authoritative and 
fascinating guide for the 
intelligent buying and 
appreciation of old furni- 
ture and household 
appointments. The author 
knows "how heart-warm- 
ing it is to associate with 
the household belongings 
of a past generation." 

Fully illustrated. $4.00 



THE 
NEW INTERIOR 

By Hazel H. Adler 

A book of recent Amer- 
ican achievements in 
interior decorating, des- 
cribing and picturing the 
latest developments in the 
art. It is a sumptuous 
volume, with eight full- 
page illustrations in color 
as well as many in black 
and white. 

Illustrated. $4.50 



viSSSir THE CENTURY CO. *TE3tf3T 




FH.EE 

Send 
fov this 
Storjj^Boo^ 




BILLY DOLL and Jane 
Doll snuggle most 
comfortably in Reddick 
Folding Brass Doll Beds and 
Cradles. Little mothers of 
the nursery and playroom 
find in these practical toys 
a constant joy. 

Reddick Beds and Cradles, 
according to the story of 
"Little Miss Grown-Up, " 
were planned in Toyland 
under the expert eye of old 
Saint Nicholas himself. 

Let us send you this story 
free. Ask your Toy Store 
Man to show you a Reddick 
Folding Brass Doll Bed or 
Cradle. They are built for 
the largest and the tiniest 
doll folk, and beautifully 
trimmed. 



Michigan Wire Goods Co. 
605 Second St., Niles, Mich. 



[HISI3 



II FREE CATALOG etui mswfrmSm is-suss 

Either pin illustrated made with any equal 
amount of lettering, one or two colors enamel. 
' Silver plate, 250 ea., $2.50 doz. Sterling silver, 
i 60c ea., $5.00 doz. Write to-day for newcatalog. 
BAST IAN BROS. CO. 
'iXS Bastian Bldg., Rochester, N.Y, 



BOATS 

STANDARD DESIGN, ECONOMICAL 

ROW BOATS 

SAIL BOATS 

MOTOR BOATS 
$45 to $550 

Delivery now, or bill of sale for spring delivery. 

CAPE COD SHIP BUILDING CORP. 

400 Main Street WAREHAM, MASS. 



<I This is a rab- 
bit's story written 
on the snow, in 
his own tracks — 
a thrilling wood- 
land tale of chase 
and capture. It 
is one of the many 
tragedies and 
comedies of the 
forest that fill 
the woodcraft 
master' s latest 
book. 




' A WOODCRAFT TRAGEDY 
At »hown by/the Tracks and Sim, in the Snow 



Good news for all — 

Ernest Thompson 
Seton's 

long-awaited companion volume to "Wild 
Animals I Have Known," and other outdoor 
books, is ready, with its thrilling messages from 
the outdoors to children and elders, and with 
ioo of the author's fascinating drawings — 

Woodland Tales 

IT is meant for children of six years 
and upward. But in the belief 
that mother or father will be active 
as a leader those chapters which are 
devoted to Woodcraft, are addressed 
to parents and teachers who through- 
out are called "the Guide." 
The greater part of the book, however, 
consists of delightful true stories like 
the one above, and others of fable and 
fairy tale flavor. They have the wild 
things of the woodland for their heroes, 
and at the heart of each there is re- 
vealed some nature secret, some truth, 
which will be an inspiration to whole- 
some outdoor life, 
ioo drawings by 
the author. 

Price $2.00 

wherever books are sold 

DOUBLEDAY 
PAGE & CO., 

Publishers 




By the Author of 

White Shadows 
in the 

South Seas 

MYSTIC ISLLS 

OF THE 

SOUTH SEAS 

'FREDERICK O'BRIEN 

/^\NCE more this author has captured between book 
^ covers the colorful witchery of the far South Seas. 
In this new book he makes the delighted reader see 
and feel the best-known of the French Pacific Islands 
—beautiful, perfumed Tahiti. But like his amazingly 
successful "White Shadows in the South Seas," the 
new volume is more than a marvelous travel book; 
it is also humor and romance with the narrative drive, 
the lyrical phrase and the dramatic suspense of a 
masterpiece of fiction. 

Not to have read "Mystic Isles of the South Seas" 
is to have missed one of the most refreshing experiences 

Of the year. Profusely illustrated. Price $5.00 

Published by 

THE CENTURY CO. j 

New York City * 





' 7 Mar£ fAe Sunny Hours, 
says the old sundial by 
the garden path: 

ST. NICHOLAS 

Makes sunnu hours of rainy .ones, marks 
sunless days red-letter days, full of fun and 
profitable interest. Whether you are to 
spend your rainy days this summer dully 
watching the downpours and the darkened skies, bored to death, 
shut in with "nothing to do," may depend upon whether you 
have some sure resource provided beforehand. 

ST. NICHOLAS, coming fresh every month and full of many, many differ- 
ent kinds of entertainment, will save the days the sundial cannot mark. 
It will give you something just right, fresh every month, and your very 
own, to read. It will suggest many good ideas for occupation — such as 
solving the puzzles or writing to a ST. NICHOLAS correspondent, writing a 
story of your own, following a recipe, trying a suggested trick or experi- 
ment, etc., etc. It will administer a general tonic of happiness and cheery 
interest to the "vacation blues" that will make you more ingenious and 
resourceful yourself. 

Better get ready for an all-round good time, and be sure you have your 
own magazine to help you through spring rains and follow you to the 
country. 



„ ( Concord, N. H.; or 
ST. NICHOLAS | 353 Fourth Avenue> New York City: 

Enclosed find $4.00, for which please send ST. NICHOLAS for one year, beginning with the 
issue, to 



S.N. 5-21 



Name 



Address. 



Riding on Pennsylvania Vacuum Cup Autobilt Bicycle 
Tires in the great health-building outdoor-land ! 

That means safety when you hit a wet stretch of pike — 
never a thought of punctures or stone-bruises — wear, 
wear, wear — toughness, speed, comfort — and beauty 
that marks your bicycle outfit as the very top- 
notcher. 

Built just like the big Vacuum Cup Automobile Tires, 
only scaled down to bicycle size. 

Quality right through the 1921 line — your choice of 
tread design and color combination — all at attractive 
prices. One universal size to fit either a 28"xlf", 
28"xl|", or 28"xl|" rim. Also Juvenile sizes. Your 
dealer will be glad to have you look them over. 

PENNSYLVANIA RUBBER COMPANY 

of AMERICA, Inc., Jeannette, Pa. 

Direct Factory Branches and Service Agencies Throughout 
the United States and Canada 
Export Department, Woolworth Building, New York City 



VACUUM CUP 



1 



STURDY STUD 





Bring Me A City! 



Heeding no barrier of river, 
mountain, forest or desert; unmind- 
ful of distance; the telephone has 
spread its network of communica- 
tion to the farthest outposts of our 
country. 

The ranchman, a score of miles 
from his nearest neighbor, a hun- 
dred miles from the nearest town, 
may sit in the solitude of his prairie 
home and, at will, order the far- 
distant city brought to him. And 
the telephone obeys his command. 

Time and space become of small 
account when, through desire or 
necessity, you would call across a 
continent. 



This is what the "Long Distance" 
service of the Bell telephone has 
accomplished for you; what sci- 
ence in construction has created; 
and what efficiency of workers has 
maintained. 

You take the telephone as much 
for granted as you do the wonder 
of the changing seasons. You ac- 
cept as a matter of course the com- 
pany's ability to keep all the parts 
of this great nation in constant 
contact. 

By so doing you offer a fine 
tribute to the Bell organization 
which has created this "Long Dis- 
tance" service — a service no other 
country has attempted to equal. 





American Telephone and Telegraph Company 
And Associated Companies 

One Policy One System Universal Service 

And all directed toward Better Service 




VENTURES^ 



IVORY >«» 





.UR tale now shifts, as 
stories must, off to the 
robber's cave, for we 
must tell how robber 
men of certain kinds 
behave. These special 
robbers were the worst 
that mortal man had 
seen; not only were 
they robbers, but out- 
ragre-ously unclean. 
Their whiskers were as 
black as ink,their faces 
dark with crime, their 
hands and coat tails 
and their hats were 
caked with mud and grime. And further- 
more, these wretched men made naughty 



3%e 

32ocLVl.U^ 

CBartl) 
Ckaptei-S:. 




plans on Sunday to dirty up the drying 
clothes that mothers washed on Monday. 

It was one Tuesday, bright and clear, on 
which our story falls. Those robbers had 
been out all night to make some cruel calls. 
They'd stripped a score of clotheslines and 
had made a snowy pile of dainty gowns and 
aprons white, and frocks of every style. 
Those roaring robbers danced and pranced 
about that pile with glee, their horrid yells 



were bad to hear, their grins were bad to 
see. But what was worse, they took those 
clothes, all clean and spotless white, and 
threw them into pools of mud, then poked 
them out of sight. The last and daintiest 
petticoat had just gone in the mire, and those 
bad robbers stood about with chortless grim 




and dire ; when suddenly they heard a sound, 
a buzzing in the sky, a whirling and a snort- 
ing that might surely terrify most anybody, 
and those rogues just trembled in their boots, 
and half a dozen ran away with terror 
stricken hoots. Down swooped a DRAGON, 
snorting fire, and, tucked from wing to wing, 
were thirty-seven tots whose shouts just 
made the welkin ring. Behind them, with a 
graceful curve, came IVORY aeroplane 
which through the mists of morning left a 
shining IVORY train. 

"Unload," cried Gnif, "there's work to do. 
We're not a bit too soon. We must com- 
pletely conquer all these robber men by noon. 
Jump to the earth, ye heroes brave, no rob- 
ber men can cope with heroes such as you, 
my dears, well armed with IVORY SOAP." 

Thus spake brave Gnif, that dauntless 
Gnome — but little Readers, wait until next 
month, I have indeed strange doings to relate. 
{To be continued.} 




Those naughty robbers will soon get 
A thoroughgoing drubbing, 

For IVORY SOAP can master them 
As well as Mother's scrubbing. 



IVORY 

IT FLOATS 




SOAP 

99^/o PURE 



Reprinted 

By Permission 
of 

I JOHN MARTIN'S 1 
BOOK 
THE CHILD'S 
MAGAZINE 

O 



CORBIE" -tX 
, . cK BRAKE 



Don't fail to tell your dealer that you want 
that new bicycle equipped with a Cor bin 
Coaster Brake! 

That's the dead-sure way of guaranteeing 
yourself positive brake control as long 
as the bicycle itself remains in use. 

No jolting or jarring the , wheel to pieces 
when you slow down or stop suddenly — 
slight pressure gradually lessens the 
speed; pressing just a trifle harder 
brings an easy, smooth, complete stand- 
still — vitally important in traffic. 

Made by Corbin — -pioneers in the business — 
twenty years of faithful service behind 
it. Don't merely ask for Corbin — make 
sure you get it. 

Fred St. Onge's famous booklet, 
"The Art of Bicycle Riding," sent 
free if you write for it. 

CORBIN SCREW CORPORATION 

American Hardware Corporation, Successor 
214 High Street New Britain, Conn. 

Branches: Sew York Chicago Philadelphia 



Hide a &icyc£e 




The Corbin Brake is standard or optional 
equipment on the following makesof bicycles. 
Insist that it be equipped on yours: 

Dayton 
Snell 
National 
Yale 
World 
Excelsior 
Admiral 
Henderson 
Crown 
America 
Adlake 
Iver Johnson 
Emblem 
Pierce 
Pope 

Cleveland 
Indian 
— and others 



A Big Help 



e cleaning 




At house-cleaning time, 
there's nothing equal to 
Old Dutch. It makes 
everything spick-and- 
span and sanitary — 
doors, windows, floors, 
walls, fixtures, utensils. 

The quality insures econ- 
omy and efficiency. 




fVFRTTHitiC"SP'CK 




^He uses his head- 
and saves his money 

(A conversation that really happened) 

SEE this Vitalic, Jim! Looks almost 
new, doesn't it? Look at that cheap 
tire on the back — it's shot — ready for the 
rag man ! And I put em both on new at 
the same time!" 

'No! Really?" 

'Yep — Honest Injun! And Dad says I'm a real 
business man because the Vitalics cost me only a 
little more than the cheap tires, but I save a nice 
$1 .50 or more on each Vitalic I buy, for the reason 
that a Vitalic lasts more than twice as long as 
two ordinary tires." 



You can tell Vitalic tires by their famous V-shaped, 
non-skid treads. They give thousands of miles 
of the hardest kind of use — they are made and 
guaranteed to do just that! 

And how they reel off the miles with never a leak 
or any kind of trouble! The rubber is extra 
strong, wear-resisting, pure rubber. The inside 
fabric is closely woven 1 4 J^-ounce motorcycle 
fabric. The fabric used in most other bicycle 
tires is only 1 2-ounce — or lighter. 

Write now for your free booklet, 
''The Truth from Tube to Tread" 

1 1 tells you why experienced 
bicyclists like postmen, 
policemen and messenger 
boys prefer Vitalics, why 
they are the best tires 
money can buy and why 
the makers of such good 
bicycles as Columbia, Day- 
ton, Emblem, Excelsior, 
Harley- Davidson, Indian, 
Iver- Johnson, Pierce and 
Yale use Vitalic tires as 
equipment on their better 
grade wheels. There is a 
copy reserved for you — free 
for the asking. Address 
Department S-6. 

CONTINENTAL RUBBER WORKS 
Erie, Pa. 





VITALIC m 

Bicycle Tires 



Tougher than 
elephant hide" 






Old Dutch Cleanser makes scrubbing easy. 
Does more and better work; saves time 
and labor. Cannot roughen or redden the 
hands. The quality insures economy. 



(The entire contents c, this Marine a re covered by the general copyright, and articles must not be reprinted without special permission., 

CONTENTS OF ST. NICHOLAS FOR JUNE, 1921 

Frontispiece: Putting the Stars on the First Flag. Painted by I L G Ferris 

Sportsmanship in Tennis. Sketch. Illustrations from photographs .... William T. Tilden, 2nd 675 

Faery Magic. Verse. Illustrated by the author Henry C Pitz Hi 

Mary Lou's Medal. Story. Illustrated by Victor Perard " Margaret E Curtis 1V> 

Aesop's Fables. Retold in Verse. Illustrated by the author ' ow HeLd S? 

The MacDonald Grit; or, The Borrowers. Story r™ H ,f 

Illustrated by Edward C. Caswell Y A. May Holaday 690 

Roses. A Quadruple Acrostic. Verse. . . . Ta „, M „ 

-Isn'ta June Wedding Just Lovely?" Drawn by R-B.^by James R °™ 695 

^ D ffiSd S b e y C c e M. R Sa ClUSi0n - • Augusta Huiell Seaman .' .' . 696 

The Merry Rain. Verse. Illustrated by Decie Merwin JosieEnnert 

WhoWillGoA-Gipsying? Verse. Illustrated by Henry C. Pitz . . . . . . . . Edith ^. Osborne 7*5 

A Summer Gown. Verse. . D1 " ' 00 

Boy Hunters in Demerara. Serial Story .' BWhe Ebzabeth Wade . ... 705 

Illustrated by J. Clinton Shepherd George Inness Hartley 706 

Everything Failed. Story. With photograph Edward Rochie Hardv 71* 

Fancy Free-The Aviator's Tribute. Verse Edward RoeMe Hardy 713 

u T . „ D , rj . ,, „ vcisc Bernard Clarke 713 

Jt pf l A F Story. Illustrated by Douglas Ryan David q H ammond 714 

*£' S d < BOyS ' Senal St ° ry - IUustrate d by C M. Relyea Beth B Gilchrist 718 

The Making of the Flag. A Patriotic Masque. H r ai T ZJ* 

Illustrations from Paintings by Henry Mosler and J. L G Ferris Alexander 72b 

How to Make a Five-Pointed Star. With diagrams 7 ,, 

Clothes. Verse. Illustrated by Decie Merwin ",,„„'„„„, „\\ 

Hints for Campers. Sketch, with diagrams . .. I.' \ . . . ] . . . . ^ZltU, 733 

The Luck of Denewood. Serial Story \ Alden Arthur Knipe ) 7 *a 

Illustrated by Emihe Benson Knipe Emilie Bemon Rn * 

Vtl R'tirt ?^ X ^ xt Illu t rate , d , by the author Edith Ballinger Price . . 743 

'taSS^' EXeCUtiVe ManSi -' Sketch. Harold G. McCoy 744 

The Watch Tower. A Review of Current Events. Illustrated. Edward N Teall 745 

Nature and Science for Young Folk. Illustrated... ' 

Rolling Over a Capsized Battle-ship (A. Russell Bond)— The Constel'la- 
tions for June (Isabel M. Lewis) - Propelling a Boat with Pumps 
(A. Russell Bond)-The Bohemian Waxwings (R Bruce Horsfall Jr ) P 

For Very Little Folk: 

T h u i T jt? t0e T ™ ins ' Prize- Winners. Pictures drawn by 
Isabel Morton Fish ' 

St. Nicholas League. With Awards' of ' Prizes for' Stories! Poem's 

Drawings, Photographs, and Puzzles. Illustrated 7 cs 

The Letter-Box. Illustrated. . . '?? 

The Riddle-Box ?JJ 

St. Nicholas Stamp Page. Conducted by Samuel R.' Simmons.' .' .' .' .' '. \ '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. Advertising' Pages 

G53ir That C thTZll°no?bVr%lf^bl^^^^ submitted for publication, only on the understanding 

should be retained by the authors f therel ° WMe » thelr P "'™™ or in transit. Copies of manuscripts 

of a yearly Yutscriptfofto^ Canadian" add^f^^ a ? VanCe - ° r 35 cents a si ^ le ™™> ^ *** 

regular price of $4.00 plus the forelgrf postogf 60 centsf Fore^fs.Th '°" ^ el % w ^ Ie throughout the world is S4.60 (the 
4 shillings; in French money ' 7^ francs co^Hn^ nn a ^„» w g su ^ n P tlons . W1 " be received in English money at 1 pound 
or registered letter. The Centu y Co ' Zerv^ th. ltX; t „ ' reqU 5 St that r emi . ttanc es be by money-order, bank check, draft, 
to refund the unexpired [credit PUBLISHED MONTHLY ? SubsCrlptlon taken contrar y t0 its selIil >g terms, and 

bind and furnish covers for s" 00 pe? Dart or l/on fnr ^ i P ? Pa,<1 i ; the tw ° cov . ers for the complete volume, S2.00. We 
us, they should be ^Unc^^&^^^^^^ nfeWfo^ njmblrf" 2 nUmberS t0 
All subscriptions for, and all business matters in connection with, St. Nicholas Magazine should be addressed to 

THE CENTURY CO. 
Publication and Circulation Office, Concord, N. H. 
Editorial and Advertising Offices, 353 Fourth Ave., New York N Y 
W. MORGAN SHUSTER, President CFrtRPF 1 uVic-c-t" nr^ -r 

DON M. PARKER, Secretary JAM^ AB^OTTM^^™^ 

• Board of Trustees 

VOL. XLVIII. GEORGE H. HAZEN, Chairman No . 8 

,n \. t J W - MORGAN SHUSTER 

(Copyright, 1921, by The Century Co.) 



(Entered a^s ^^{^j I^^TW at the United S^P^^^i 
Act of March 3, 1879. Entered at the Post Office Department, Ottawa, Canada.) 



under the 



ABINGDON 



THE child-mind 
is like the sculp- 
tor's clay — ready to 
be moulded into a 
thing of beauty. 
Parents are the 
artists of their chil- 
dren's lives ; and 
those who love 
wisely will mould 
with only the finest 
tools. 

To these parents 
the "Little Folks' 
Series" will be most 
welcome. Full of 
understanding, full 
of sympathy — the 
books recount and 
illustrate the beau- 
tiful stories of the 
Bible, of the classics, 
and of heroes and 
heroines whose lives 
form glorious pages 
in history. 

No finer tools have 
been wrought; no 
finer tools can be 
employed by the 
parent than Abing- 
don books for little 
folks. 



BOOKS for Little Folks 

LITTLE FOLKS OF THE BIBLE 

(IN FOUR BOOKS) 
BOOK I 

BOYS IN PATRIARCHAL HOMES 

Isaac. Ishmael. Joseph. Benjamin. 
BOOK II 

BOYS IN THE DAYS OF THE PROPHETS 
David. Samuel. Daniel. The Shunammite's Son. 
BOOK III 
GIRLS OF THE BIBLE 

The Story of Miriam. Jephthah's Daughter. 

The Captive Maid. Jairus's Daughter. 

BOOK IV 

BOYS OF THE NEW TESTAMENT 

The Boyhood of Jesus. The Lad with the Loaves. 

John the Baptist. Paul's Nephew. 

LITTLE FOLKS FROM LITERATURE 

(IN FOUR BOOKS) 
Four books, each containing classic stories for children. The 
stories are not random selections from the classics, interspersed 
with weaker material. They are the child parts of famous novels, 
essays and collections of verse. In these books Dickens, Steven- 
son, Lowell, Tennyson, and Victor Hugo speak direct to your child. 

LITTLE FOLKS IN ART 

(IN FOUR BOOKS) 

BOOK I 
Stories about portraits of 
historical little folks, each pic- 
ture — except the "Princes in 
the Tower" — painted from life 
by the great artists of their 
day. 

BOOK II 
Stories about pictures which 
illustrate famous incidents in 
the lives of historical people, 
or an incident from history it- 
self, as in the case of the little 
Christian martyr) in the arena 
of lions. 



BOOK III 

Stories of pictures by six 
great artists, which show the 
children of several foreign 
countries at their work and 
play. Each picture is a work 
of art. 



BOOK IV 

Stories about pictures chosen 
because of their story-telling 
qualities. As they are pictures 
of young people, they will have 
a double appeal to children. 

LITTLE FOLKS IN HISTORY 

(IN FOUR BOOKS) 
Little Heroes. Little Folks on Thrones. 

Little Heroines. Little Folks Who Did Great Things. 

Charmingly written stories of Mozart, Florence Nightingale, 
Audubon, James Watt, Helen Keller, Richard II, Louis XIV, 
Queen Isabella, Edward VI, Mary Stuart, Lady Jane Grey, 
Jacqueline of Holland, Prascbvia of Siberia, Pocahontas, etc. 
Illustrated. Cloth. Per book, Net, 50 cents, Postpaid. 
{Prices are subject to change without notice) 



THE ABINGDON 

NEW YORK 



PRESS 

CINCINNATI 



I 



ST. NICHOLAS 

| NEXT MONTH AND TO COME 



The Black Sheep's Coat CORNELIA MEIGS 

A black sheep, sign of ill luck, and a stowaway, who becomes a scape- 
goat for the Mayflower passengers, prove that black wool makes a 
good coat, and that a man's courage can be found in a boy's heart. 

John O' Birds MABEL ANSLEY MURPHY 

A beautifully-written tribute to John Burroughs, lover of, and be- 
loved by, the wild-folk, and friend as well to boys and girls. 

H Nerve in the Pinch WILLIAM T. TILDEN, 2nd 

Tells of the tense moments in big tennis matches where skill and 
sportsmanship are backed up by a flash of spirit and nerve, suffi- 
cient to clinch victory. The second of a splendid series (the first 
of which is in this number) by the world's champion. 

The Mightiest Eagle J. HORACE LYTLE 

For ages past great birds have winged their way out of the North 
in autumn and back again in spring, but this story tells of the 
flight of a bird that knows no seasons, which first spread its mighty 
wings in our own century, and here pushes its way into hitherto 
unexplored spaces of the sky. 

Knights of the Wild-Fire MARY C. DU BOIS 

Did you know that as long ago as the days of Queen Elizabeth, 
fire-works were used in celebrations? And that they did just as 
much damage as they do on our own "Fourth"? Two boys prove 
themselves enthusiastic "warriors" and energetic fire-fighters, and 
are rewarded by "Good Queen Bess." 

A Glimpse of Our Country's Heirlooms 

WILBUR GASS 

In our State Department at Washington, there are some priceless 
papers and relics, which are exhibited on rare occasions. Some 
high-school boys and girls who live in the capital city had the privi- 
lege recently of seeing them, and one of the students — a boy of 16 
— has described the visit in a very interesting short article. 



£<I>X<I>X<»"iiiE^«^»>^ 




I 



9 



A young George Sisler 

It takes good stout clothes to stand the 
workouts that they are given by you young 
first basemen 

The old clothes would be better for the 
occasion, of course, but boys dont seem to get time 
to change 

Our clothes are made so well that a stiff ball game 
in the back lot doesn't hurt them any 

They We stylish; guaranteed to satisfy 

Hart SchafFner & Marx 

Boys' clothes as good as father's CaM „ sh ,,„, s,^,* 




Summer 




WITH June days here, and school days over, we 're on our 
way to a summer of outdoors, of health and happiness. 
\ acation— two full months of It in the open— where early to bed 
and early to rise means doing the very thing we ourselves want to do. 

We 're going to swim, 
fish, play and learn things 
weneverdreamedof before; 
we're going to eat good 
food and plenty; we 're go- 
ing to ride horses and climb 
mountains; canoe on quiet, 
clear water, and sleep un- 
der twinkling stars. 

There are friends to be 
made in woods and fields, and with rod and line there 's to be the 
thrill of a "big fella" that pulls to match your own strength. 

There 's a sunrise over the mountains or out of the sea. There 's 
a full moon making a rippling path of silver on the lake. There 's 
pine and salt in the air and the exhilaration of physical joy. 

( And friends we shall make that we are happy to have. We 're 
going to forget self-consciousness and timidity, and learn self- 
reliance and initiative. The word " fear" we '11 discard forever. 

Wait until some day on a hike we learn how to make a fire and 
cook our own food, or follow a trail, or know the trees! Then 

troublesome algebra and Cae- 
sar's Wars in Gaul will be left 
behind, while we fill our lungs 
with sweet-smelling, life-giv- 
ing breezes. And as we go off 
to sleep, perhaps on fragrant 
balsam, there '11 come the 
singing wind in the trees. 

The winter past has been 
a hard one for father's busi- 




the watch-word of the home. 



ness, and economy has been 
But the worst of bad times seems 
clearing, and better conditions are just ahead. Two months of 
camps, or even less, are not expense — they are investments in 
health for son and daughter. 

In St. Nicholas are to be found every kind of good camps 
where complete satisfaction is to be had for both, parents and son 
or daughter. Let us help you make the choice. 



|Mnni 




THE TALL PINES 



A Summer Camp for Girls 

Juniors 7-13. Seniors 13-18. Club over 18. 
On Lake George at Bennington, N. H., the camp nestles 
among the pines — as healthy a spot as can be found anywhere. 
Athletics, swimming, boating, canoeing, tennis, basket-ball. 
Camping trips, mountain climbing. Folk dancing. Special oppor- 
tunity for horseback riding. Arts and crafts for rainy days. Good 
food, well cooked, home care and attention. The Club accepts 
Campers for a week or longer. Catalog. Address 
MISS EVELINA REAVELEY, 12A Beacon St., Gloucester, Mass. 




WINNEMONT 



A Camp for Girls 



Uu Lake Ossipee, in the foothills of the White Mountains. Special 
attention to happiness, health, and safety. Automobile tcips to our 
White Mountain Camp. Canoeing, swimming, sailing, horseback 
riding, archery, and all sports. For illustrated booklet address 
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Benlley, Elinor C. Barta. 
Room 305, 14 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 




mr^+*f\ 1 The Island 

I 3 ITI p J Camp for Girls 

CHINA. MAINE 

Regular camp activities including land and 
water sports, over night trips, and horse- 
back riding. For booklet address 

Mr. and Mrs. C. F. TOWNE, Lasell Seminary 
122 Woodland Park, Auburndale, Mass. 



Summer Camps for (girls— Contfiratb 




ROMANY CAttP 

At Woodstock, Conn. 

The Place for a Girl — 7 to 18 



Planned for the wisest development of girls. Healthy 
nappy growth in the open-air, woodsy country. Swim- 
ming, hiking, horseback riding and all outdoor sports 
under expert supervision. Roomy, comfortable sleeping 
and hying lodges. Good, plentiful food. Ideal location, 
easy of access. Catalogue. 



STANLEY KELLEY 



Pomfret, Conn. 




CAMP MYSTIC 



MYSTIC 
CONNECTICUT 
"MISS JOBE'S CAMP FOR GIRLS" 

The salt water camp for girls. Half way between New York and Boston 
Life in the New England hills, woods, and by the sea. Unusual build- 
ings, tent bungalows. Shower and tub baths. Modern sanitation Salt 
water sports motorboating, swimming, safe canoeing, horseback riding 
dancing field athletics, arts and crafts, dramatics. Camp life and tript 
under the personal direction of Miss Jobe who has had nine seasons of 
the rVifi " per ' L ' ,1 . ce (summer and winter) in camping and exploration in 
the Canadian Rockies. Care for the safety and health of each cam. 
Juniors and Seniors. Age 8-18. Booklet 

MARY L. JOBE, A.M., F. R.G.S. 
Room 63, 50 Morningside Drive, New York 



Maine, Monmouth. 

CAMP MINNETONKA For G\t\s. A thousand feet 
, , _ -of lake frontage in one of 

nature s beauty spots. Bungalows and tents. No fogs. Canoeing swim 
ming tennis, etc. Every camp comfort and pleasure. Personal attention 
booklet. Geo. W. Rieger, Jr., Principal. Northeast School. 

5th and Race Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 



New HAMPSHmE, Stinson Lake. 

EAGLE POINT 

Mountain camp in heart of White Mountains. Fully equipped for all 
camp activities. Trained leaders. A beautiful and profitable place for 
your daughter. Virginia E. Spencer, Ph.D., Secretary 120 West 42nd 
Street, New York City. 




ONEKA 

The Pennsylvania 
Camps for Girls 

Junior and Senior Camps on crystal 
clear Lake Arthur in the heart of 
the Poconos. Elevation 2.200 feet. 

Outdoor life. Lasting friendships. 

Rustic bungalows and tents on 
lake shore. SPLENDID EQUIP- 
MENT for every land and water 
sport. Athletic Field; Horseback 
Riding; Gypsy Trips; Handicrafts; 
Dramatics; Pageantry; Music. 

Outdoor Woodcraft Council. 

Cultivation of personality and self- 
reliance. 14 seasons and not an ac- 
cident. Mr. and Mrs. Sipple give 
their close personal care to each 
girl. Send for illustrated booklet. 
MR. and MRS. E. W. SIPPLE 
Directors 
350 W. Duval St., ueriiiantunn 
Phila.. Pa. 




A-T Lake Winnipesaukee. 
C-amp Acadia for Girls, 
a-ll land and water sports, 
d-o you want to join us ? 
i — llustrated booklet, 
a-ge limit 8 to 16 years. 




DR. and MRS. J. GRANT QUIMBY, Laftftaprt, N. H. 



Pennsylvania, Pocono Mountains. 

PINE TREE CAMP FOR GIRLS 

On beautiful Naomi Lake, 2000 feet above the sea, in pine-laden air of 
Pocono Mountains. Four hours from New York and Philadelphia 
Bungalows and tents on sunny hill. Experienced councilors. Horseback 
riding, tennis, baseball, canoeing, '■hikes"— all outdoor sports. Handi- 
crafts, gardening. 10th season. 

Miss Blanche D. Pric e, 404 W. School Lane, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Maine, Lin-e-kin Bay. 

LIN-E-KIN BAV CATV/TP Ideal cam P for g' rls cn 

t d , . WUVlf coast f Maine. Limited 

number. Personal care. Arts and crafts. Land and water sports; boat- 
ing; dramatics. Dancing; hikes and trips. For booklet, 

Mr. and Mrs. G. R. Branch, 65 Fruit Street, Worcester, Mass. 



The Hanoum Camps 

FOR GIRLS 

THETFORD, VERMONT 

Hill Camp for girls under 15— Lake Camps for those 
over 15. Swimming, canoeing, and all water sports on our 
own lake. Riding. Gypsy trips. 
Our girls go home strong in body, 
mentally alert, and inspired with 
the highest ideals. 13th year. 
Illustrated booklet. 

PROFESSOR and MRS. C. H. 

FARNSWORTH 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 
New York City, N. Y. 

All counsellor positions filled. 




Summer Camps! for dltrte— Continueb 




Senior and junior Camps for Girls (under 20), Roxbury, Vt. 

The Mountains' Call 



Dear Girls: 

A voice has gone out to East, West and 
South, over all the land, crying, "Come, girls of 
the far cities ! Come, now, to Teela-Wooket, 
your summer home among the Green Moun- 
tains. Here wait many friends to bring you 
joy and laughter. Here are woodsy trails, 
the sweet music of happy birds, the song of 
tumbling water. Here are flowers and luscious 
fruits awaiting your hands. Here are blue 
sky and fleecy clouds of summer days; here 
the star-decked spaces of night, the call of 
whip-poor-wills where moonlight steals along 
the forest edges." 

This is the call of the mountains. It speaks 
of widefflistances, the open country. It brings 
memories of glorious days on horseback along 
the forest trails. It hints of camping trips, 
out where wind and sun and the clean sweet 
air of fields and mountain-sides bring for- 
getfulness of months spent in school-rooms and 
crowded city streets. It calls to life, to hours 
of glorious comradeship, to the jolliest days of 
the year. 

So, in a few short weeks many of us shall 
meet at Teela-Wooket. Spotty, Major, Smug- 
gler and all the other horses 
in the famous Teela-Wooket 
stables will be waiting for 
old pals and new friends. 
The swimming pond will 



Seventh Letter 
be alive with girls. The hills will echo with 
the shouts and laughter of care-free hikers. 
The smoke of camp-fires will go up from 
Kowshicum and Chop-and-Saw. In all the 
land there will be no happier place than there 
at our summer home, Teela-Wooket. 

This is the last time we shall talk to all 
our friends before we see you at Teela-Wooket. 
If you want to be among the merry girls there 
this summer you must let us know at once. 
If you haven't received one of our booklets 
showing many pictures of this fairyland and 
the joyful girls who live here during the sum- 
mer, we will send you one. Do not delay in 
writing us. 

We wish you could all join our happy family 
this year. There are so many good times com- 
ing to us this summer that we want every one 
of our St. Nicholas friends to enjoy them with 
us. We wish for your brothers, too, a splendid 
time at Camp Idlewild. We do not say good- 
bye but "au revoir" since we will meet you 
in a few weeks at Teela-Wooket. 



Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Roys 

10 Bowdoin St. 
Cambridge Mass. 




THE WONDERLAND CAMPS IN THE GREEN MOUNTAINS 



Summer Camps for (girls— Ctmhnueb 



Xquanset 

On Pleasant Bay, South Orleans, Mass. 




The Cape Cod Camp 
For Girls 

The Pioneer Salt Water Camp 
Established 1905 



C'XTENSIVE additions to acreage, buildings, 
•Li and equipment. (Special opportunities for 
salt water swimming, canoeing, sailing, tennis, 
dancing, team games. Horseback riding. Expert 
instruction and leadership. Red Cross Life Sav- 
ing Corps and board of examiners. Unusual 
results in health and vigor. The same personal 
care and supervision by the directors. 
Separate camp for Quanset kiddies. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. A. W. HAMMATT 
Box 1 

South Orleans, Mass. 



f A,, 




ft* 



For 
Girls 

m 



Camp Twa-ne-ko-tah 

On Beautiful Lake Chautauqua, N. Y. 

Ideal location, 1500 ft. elevation. Fifth season of 8 weeks. 
(Formerly on Lake Erie.) All land and water sports, 
horseback riding, hiking, dramatics, interpretative danc- 
ing, handicraft. Home care. Complete equipment. Senior 
and Junior Camps. Write for Illustrated Booklet. 
REV. and MRS. R. S. STOLL 
College Hill Snyder, N. Y. 



New Hampshire, Dorchester, 

VAGABONDIA 

A call to the mystery and delight of woods. A place for wholesome 
ramaraderie. A stimulus to simple and joyous living. A mountain camp 
lor girls, limited in number. Booklet. Address Florence M. Eis 938 
Delaware Ave., Detroit, or Emily McClure, 7 Glenada PI, Brooklyn 




Camp Cowasset 

North Falmouth, Mass., on Buzzards Bay, Cape 
Cod. The. Seashore Camp for Girls. Senior and Junior 
camps. 

Seniors: Canoe and boat trips, use of fine saddle 
horsesand best instruction without extra charge. Pageant, 
Water Carnival, tennis and games, gypsy trips, handi- 
crafts. First Aid and Camp Paper. 

Juniors: Salt watersports, careful oversight, free riding 
and instruction, overnight hikes, nature study, tennis, 
basketball, baseball, volley ball, dramatized stories, good 
food, good fun and good care. 

Address MISS BEATRICE A. HUNT, Plymouth St. 
Holbrook, Mass. 




Connecticut. 

CAMP NEHANTIC FOR GIRLS 

An exclusive sea-shore camp. Salt water bathing, fishing, crabbing; 
land and water trips, athletic games and water sports. Experienced 
physical training director in charge at all times. Two months, $180. 
Booklet. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Davison. 

5333 Rising Sun Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Vermont, Lake Fairlee. 

WYODA Lake Fairlee > Vermont. The Ideal Home Camp for 
Young Girls. Parental care. Camp Mother. All sports. 
Swimming, canoeing, handicraft, woodcraft, riding, dancing, dramatics, 
nature study, mountain trips, French conversation. Booklet. Mr. and 
Mrs. Harvey Newcomer, Lowerre Summit Park, Yonkers. N.Y. 



NESHOBE 

™ " (Clear Water) 



A Camp ^ 
For Girls 



On Fairlee Lake, So. Fairlee, Vt. 

100 Acres. Wonderful view. 80 rods water- 
front, sandy beach. Large and attractive main 
bungalow and sleeping bungalows. Tennis and 
basket-ball courts, athletic field, horseback rid- 
ing, hiking. Athletics, arts and crafts, water 
color sketching, taught by competent instructors. 
Careful personal supervision. 

Write for descriptive booklet 

MR. and MRS. EDWARD G. OSGOOD 
300 Chestnut St., Clinton, Mass. 



SARGENT CAMPS 



PETERBORO, N. H. 
The Athletic Camps 
for Girls 

Every activity, every hour of 
play has its purpose in helping 
the girl toward healthy, happy 
life. Skilled leaders train the 
Sargent Camps girls to excel in 
all sports. Woodcraft, water 
sports, hiking, horseback rid- 
ing, field games, pantomime, 
music und dancing. 

Junior Camp. Homecraft for 
little folks. A happy combina- 
tion of home-making and play 
in large play houses. 

For illustrated catalogue 
address Camp Secrelarv, 8 Ever- 
nit SI.. Cambridge, Mass. 




Summer Camps! for #trte— Conttnueb 




THE ANCHORAGE 

Finest Appointed Summer Camp for Girls in the United States 

On Beautiful Lake Winnipesaukee, N. H. — Foothills White Mountains 



Modern Bungalows. 
Electric Lights. 
Fine Saddle Horses. 
Free Riding and Instruc- 
tion. 
Motor Boating. 
Canoeing. 
Swimming, Diving. 




Tennis, Basket-ball, 

Baseball, Archery. 

Arts and Crafts, Basketry. 

Music, Dancing. 

Volley Ball, Hiking. 

Motion Pictures. 

Water Carnival. 



Highest Grade Counselors and Instructors from Foremost American Colleges. 
Modern Dairy and Farm connected. 

Send for booklet to 

ESTHER B. SUTCLIFFE, Secretary, care of State Normal School, FRAMINGHAM, MASS. 




Summer Camps; for (girls;— Continueb 




T^stmore 

The Quality Camps for Girls 

FAIRLEE AND BARTON, VT. 

Horseback riding is the most popular sport at Wynona- 
Westmore. Large stable of fine saddle horses. Expert 
instructors. The Annual Horse Show is the most im- 
portant social event of the summer around Wynona- 
Westmore Camps. 

Also hiking, swimming, canoeing, tennis, golf and arch- 
ery. Ideal location among the Green Mountains. Splen- 
did, modern camp equipment. Junior and Senior camps. 
Send for booklet. Address: 

WYNONA CAMPS 

276 Summer Street Fitchburg, Mass. 

Lake Morey Club — a modern hotel under same management 




The Kentucky 
Camp for Girls 




Trail's End 

Write for Booklet. 
MISS SNYDER, 364 S. Broadway, Lexington, Ky. 

Maine, Oxford. 
Naunifl on Lake Thompson, July 1st— Sept. L Terms 
na,a J u *^00( 110 extras). The cumpof high standards. 
Girls 7-16 yeni s. All land and water sports. Handicrafts. 
Hikes. Two-day "White lit. trip. Every care of director and 
experienced councillors. Physician. Nurse. All councillor 
positions rilled. Catalog. Clara Henderson, Director. 



For Girls 
LUNENBURG, VERMONT 

In White Mountain region. Mile of lake" 
shore. Free horseback riding, water and 
field sports, handicrafts, music and dancing 
under expert instructors. Sponson and war 
canoes. Screened bungalows. Spring and 
artesian well water. Perfect sanitation. Best 
of everything for the best girls. Booklet on 
request. 

Herbert F. Balch Dept. S St. Johnsbury, Vt. 




New York, Cooperstown. 

THE PATHFINDERS' LODGE 

A Woodland Camp for Girls 
On Otsego Lake. All sports and unusual opportunities for studv of art 
and music. Mrs. Douglas Basnett, 237 W. 74th St. New York City 
Telephone: Columbus, 8049 



New Jersey, Essex Fells. 

THE PARSONS SCHOOL- Summer Sess , on 

Girls under fourteen years. Pupils may enter at any time. Enrollment 
imited. Outdoor sports, pets, gardens, nature study, excursions, special 
tutoring. Emphasis placed on health and happiness. 

Address: Miss H. Grace Parsons 



if' 



For Every Girl 
SUMMER IN the GIRLS' CAMP 

By Anna Worthington Coale 

EVERYTHING you need to enable you to fit in comfortably at 
once, understand everything, and be ready for all the activities 
and customs of camps. The author has made it as interesting to 
read as a good story. 

THE CENTURY CO., 353 Fourth Ave, New York City 

Who Goes to Her First Camp 

This summer 



Price $1.75 

Profusely illustrated 
with photographs of 
actual camp activi- 
ties. At all book- 
stores. 



Summer Camp* for <girte— Continueb 




CAMP TEGAWITHA 

FOR GIRLS 
MT. POCONO, PA. 

An ideal camp in an ideal location in the famous Pocono 
Mountains — 2000 feet above sea level. Electric light, 
hot tub and shower baths. All land and water sports, horse- 
back riding, tramping, nature study, arts and crafts, Eng- 
lish reading. Resident physician. Experienced counselors. 
Wholesome, well prepared food and pure water. Health 
and safety given first consideration. For booklet address 
MISS MARY ANGELA LYNCH Mt. Pocono, Pa. 



Massachusetts, Orleans, Cape Cod. 

Mrs. Norman White's Camp for Girls 

A Seaside Camp in the pines. All pleasures of life by the sea. Outdoor 
sleeping in well-protected cabins. Limited membership. 

Mrs. Norman White, 
Tel. Morningside 3350. 424 West 119th Street, New York City. 




(amp(otuit 



For girls of 9 to 20. Beauti- 
ful location on Cape Cod with 
fresh and salt water bathing. 
Horseback riding, tennis, canoe- 
ing, all field sports and games. 
Swimming taught by experts on 
delightful beach. Girls swim not 
only for pleasure but for strength 
and health building. Tutoring 
if desired. Catalog. Address 

Miss Emma L. Schumacher 
Care Miss Beard's School 
Orange, N. J. 




Altitude 
1400' 

above S. L. 



HELDERBERG MOUNTAINS 
ALBANY CO., N. Y. 



Does your girl enjoy Water Sports? Does she like Athletics? 
Is she interested in Handicraft Work? Would you choose 
Experienced College Graduates to supervise her Daily 
Routine? Do you want her to enjoy an Ideal Summer Out 
of Doors? Then Enroll her at 

Orinsekwa "The Camp in the Pines" 
Non-Sectarian — For further information apply to 
JEANNETTE FRANK, A. B., A. M., 529 West 179th Street, New York 



THE WINNETASKA 
CANOEING CAMPS 




WE'RE OFF FOR A PADDLE ON THE LAKE, 

IN OUR GRAY CANOES SO TRIM; 
WE'LL CRUISE AMONG THE ISLANDS THERE, 

AND THEN WE'LL TAKE A SWIM; 
WE'LL COOK OUR LUNCH ON A SANDY BEACH, 

WE'LL COOK OUR SUPPER TOO; 
WE'LL PITCH OUR TENTS IN A SHADY GROVE — 

WE'RE A WINNETASKA CREW! 

WINNETASKA 

THE CANOEING CAMP FOh GIRLS 

SQUAM LAKE, ASHLAND, NEW HAMPSHIRE 
DR. and MRS. JOHN B. MAY 

BOX 1321 COHASSET, MASSACHUSETTS 




New York, Adirondack Mountains. 
/-»AT\/TD /"TTTk A TP A select camp for girls on beau- 
V^rUVllr \^H,LJr\JS. tifu ) Schroon Lake. Land and 
water sports. Excellent bathing beach; safe canoeing; ex- 
perienced councilors ; home atmosphere. First class table. 
Illustrated book. 

Miss A. Fox, Director, 324 Preston St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
or Miss A. Beknkopf, 503 W. 121st St., N. Y. City. 



CACAPON SPRINGS CAMP 

For Girls of All Ages 

Beautifully located at historic Capon Springs, 
W. Va., on the western rim of the Shenandoah Valley. 
One hundred miles due west of Washington; twenty- 
seven miles west of Winchester, Va. 

Comfortable quarters in Hygeia cottage, facing the 
campus of the famous summer resort. Swimming 
pool, bowling alley, all outdoor sports. Bathing 
arcade built by the State of Virginia. Trained coun- 
selors. Personal supervision. Health, recreation and 
culture. 

Opens July 5, under the protection of the Capon 
Springs Company. 

For particulars, address 
KATHERINE R. GLASS 
Fort Loudoun Seminary Winchester, Va. 



Wetomachek Camps for Girls 

Powers Lake, Wisconsin 




Under the management of The Chicago 
Normal School of Physical Education 

Junior and Senior Camps. July and August. 
For girls, ages 9 to 22. A strong force of 
trained counselors. References required. 

Write for Booklet 
Registrar, Box 18, 5026 Greenwood Ave., Chicago, HI. 



Summer Camps; for <gtrte— Conttnueti 




Kineowatha Camps for Girls 

Elisabeth Bass, B.A., Director 
Wilton, Maine 



CAMP KINEOWATHA 
Recreation, Girls 8 to 18 

An unusual camp for 
girls who seek quality 
and refinements in 
living conditions as well 
as "real camping" ex- 
perience. All sports 
and crafts. 

All possible safeguards. 
Experienced staff. 
Beautiful envi- 
ronment. 



Mention which camp 
is desired 



KINEOWATHA SCHOOL CAMP 
Tutoring, Older Girls 

Meets needs of girls pre- 
paring for college entrance 
examinations. Endorsed 
by leading women's col- 
leges. 

Ideal living conditions. 
Occupies most complete 
equipment of Abbott 
school at Farmington, Me. 
Week-end camping trips 
to Rangeley Moun- 
tains, etc. All sports. 



Mention tutoring 
needed 



Address IRVING U. McCOLL, Hotel McAIpin, New York 



CAMP OWAISSA 23£S£^ k " 

With all the delights of water, mountain and woodland — 
the place for a girl who wishes to be a real camper. Post 
office, Sabael, Iff. Y. For Booklet, address 
MISS SALLIE E. WILSON, Box S 
National Cathedral School, Washington, D.C. 




Are You Going Camping 
This Summer? 




OU will go to a camp if you can, 
because such a vacation as this 
gives you a wonderful store of 
health. But where will you 
go ? St. Nicholas is well acquainted 
with the summer camps of America. 
If you wish help in selecting your 
camp, write a letter giving as much 
information as possible about the kind 
of a camp you would like to attend. 




PINE KNOLL CAMP 



FOR GIRLS CONWAY N H 

vrSt a K of .^' h , ite . Mountains, on lovely secluded Lake ion a' 
Most beautiful girls' camp in New England. Noted lor its 
fine equipment and splendid class of girls. Full camp program 
of nding, athletics, water sports, etc. Number limited ti fort? 
One councilor to every three girls. Constant personal sup"?: 
vision by the Director. Eighth season. Booklet 
_ \ _. . MRS - FRANCES H. WHITE 
Rock Ridge Hall Wellesley Hills, Mass. 



Silver Lake Camps 

In the Adirondacks 

Separate Camps for Juniors and Seniors 

All sports including swimming, canoeing, baseball, 
basket-ball, tennis, and horseback riding taught by 
experts. Jewelry work. Graduate nurse. Sleeping 
porches. Open-air dining room. For illustrated 
booklet address: 

Director, Silver Lake Camps, 
Bradford Academy, Bradford, Mass., or 

Secretary, Silver Lake Camps, 

Apt. 6 F, 59 Livingston St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Tel. 8688 Main 




ST. NICHOLAS CAMP EDITOR 
353 Fourth Avenue, New York City 

Please have information about camps sent to me. 



My age is Location desired. 

Large or small camp 

Name of camp I have attended . . . 

Name 

Address 



Parent's Signature . 



Summer Camps for (girls— Conttnuea 




EGGEMOGGIN CAMP FOR GIRLS 

New Meadows Bay, East Harpswell, Maine 

Ages 8-20. Limited to 40. Seventh season. Early enrollment 
necessary. All land and water sports under trained supervisors. 

Horseback riding free 
Tuition $300. No extras except laundry. Write for illustrated booklet. 

MR. AND MRS. EDWARD L. MONTGOMERY, Directors 
Mount Ida School for Girls Newton, Mass. 




6tk CAMP 



For 
Girls 



On Mallett's Bay 

Year V^^-VAVH Girls Lake Champlain 

WJ I M 1M A l-l \C F" F" In the tonic air of the pines of 
W ll^l^l/\nXVE<Ei Vermont. An ideal camp for an 
outdoor summer brimming with fun. All land and water sports — 
horseback riding, motor-boating, dancing, dramatics, handicraft. 
Experienced councilors. Trained nurse. Send for Booklet. 

Mrs. Wm. H. Brown, 307 W. 83d St., New York City 



New Hampshire, Portsmouth. 

CAMP BEAU RIVAGE 

French camp for girls. All sports. Address Secretary, 



57 E. 74th St., New York City. 



Wisconsin, Green Lake. 

SANDSTONE CAMPS 

Three camps, 150 girls, ages 8 to 22. Season eight weeks. $325. Tenth 
season. Miss Esther G. Cochrane, 

3722 Pine Grove Ave., Chicago. 

Vermont, Lake Champlain. 

THE ARROWHEAD CAMP FOR GIRLS 

Lake Champlain. 
Illustrated booklet "E" on request. Address 

Maegabet Dudley, 39 Remsen St., Brooklyn, New York. 



CHINQUEKA CAMP ck 

Among the Litchfield Hills 



On 
Bantam 
Lake 
Conn. 



A healthy, happy, helpful vacation place for 
thirty girls, 8 to 14. under home influences. 
Woods, fields and lake at 1000 ft. elevation. 
Land and water sports. Careful training; 
sympathetic comradeship. Tents, lodge, cot- 
tage with modern plumbing. Abundant table 
with farm and dairy products. Moderate 
rates. Booklet. 



David Layton, Direclor. 669 Dawson St., New York City 




Camp Wuttaunoh 

On Crystal Lake, Canaan, N. H. 

Eighth Season 

All the usual land and 
water sports. Nature 
Study and Handi- 
crafts. Elevation 
1300 ft. Healthful. 
Sanitary. Bungalows. 
Trained Nurse. 
Terms , including 
horseback riding $300 

Address until June 20 

and Mrs. Ethan Allen Shaw 
Northfield, Vermont 



Virginia, Bristol. 

CAMP JUNALUSKA 

One of the finest "all around" camps for girls in the south. Lake Juna- 
luska, N. C, the "Land of the Sky." Swimming, canoeing, mountain 
climbing, horseback riding, dancing, handcraft, music and dramatics, all 
under careful supervision. Write for booklet. 

Miss Ethel J. McCoy, Director, Virginia Intermont College, Bristol, Va. 



Long Island, Bellport. 

CAMP GRANGE 

Under the direction of experienced Directress and Counselors. Limited 
to fifty girls, 5-14 years. Fifty acres. All sports, ocean and still water 
bathing. For catalogue address Miss C. B. Hagedorn, 606 West 
137th Street, New York City. 



New Hampshire, New London, on Lake Pleasant. 

CAMP WEETAMOO for Girls |ff, s c e a a r p 

Life. Tents, Sleeping Shacks, Main Bungalow, Trained Leaders. 
Music, Crafts, Sports, Nature Study. For booklet, address. 
Miss Florence E. Griswolb, 313 Hope St., Providence, R. I. 




CAMP 
A R E Y 

Lake Keuka 
NEW YORK 

On the loveliest lake 
in New York. Wonder- 
ful swimming, hikes, 
camping trips, war 
canoes, small canoes. 
Competitive athletics, 
baseball, basket-ball , 
field hockey, outdoor 
dancing, weekly shows 
and parties, camp 
paper. Limited enroll- 
ment. Thecampwhere 
abound spirit, health 
and happiness. 

MRS. A. FONTAINE 
713 Eastern Parkway 
Brooklyn - • N. Y. 




CAMP WAMPANOAG 

ISth Season Cape Cod, Buzzards Bay 

^/T a ^ Wat f er i rara , P t0 I h "F from8 to18 ' Scouting over 
old Indian trails. Land and water sports, prizes Athletics 

m^rfTo™ C0 " 8g " meD - MiHtary dri11 - °«»P 
MRS. BERTRAND E. TAYLOR, Director 
Mr. Aldrich TAYLOR, Advisory Director 

240 Grant Avenue Newton Centre, Mass. 



28th 
\Year 



For 
Boys 



CAMP 
CHAMPLAIN 



On Mallett's Bay 
Lake Champlain 
Where Boys Say 
"It is Great!" 

They return home bright-eyed and nimble-limbed after a 
great vacation of canoeing, swimming, hiking, baseball, 
basket-ball, horseback riding — under careful supervision 
Boys 7 to 1G. Write for booklet. W. H. Brown President 
Berkeley-Irving School, 307 West 83rd St., New York City 



Michigan, Manistee. 

CAMP TOSEBO Under the management of Todd Semi- 
„. ... ... . ... nary for B °ys, Woodstock, 111. 

1'isnmg, hiking, boating, swimming. Wonderland of woods and water 
Unusual equipment. Reasonable rates. Overnight boat ride (direct) 
from Cbicago. Address Noble Hill, Woodstock Illinois 



0^ixi^> Eastfora 

The Place for a Boy Eastford, Conn. 

For wide-awake, clean, manly boys from seven to seventeen For 
boys who hke scout life, the open country, the Ion? wood trails For 
boys who want to swim, fish, hike, ride a horse o? paddle a canoe 

College and University men who were just such boys direct all ramn 
CaX'ue. C ° mfortable buildi ^. «H '°ca«ed. lK of too " fooT 
STANLEY KELLEY, Director Pomfret, Conn. 



PEQUAWKET CAMPS n^SSS**. 

In the White Mountains. Private pond; wooded shores; sandy 
beach. Canoeing, boating, motor boating. All water 
sports. Scoutcraft, Woodcraft. Mountain climbing Field 
Athletics. Horses. White Mountain Mineral Spring 
Water. Tutoring. $200, eight weeks. Illustrated booklet. 
MR. and MRS. EUGENE I. SMITH, Conway, N. H. 



Maine, Little Sebago Lake 

AIMHI 

You will never regret it 

Camp Aimhi is a small camp for boys 
Let us tell you about it 
Maurice L. Hodgson, 96 Shornecliffe Road, Newton Mass 




Robert M. McOnllor 
Princeton 1911 



CAMP* VEGA 

CHARLESTON LAKE 

ONTARIO, CANADA 

(Only 12 hours from New York City ) 
Our aim is to provide a growing boy with a wonderful 
summer vacation, coupled with the inspiring leadership 
of the highest type of American college men. 
, °%S e adcouncilor is Mr. Robert M. McCullorh, Prince- 
ton ly^l an Honor man and a leader in every sense of 
the word. He is Captain of the Princeton Track Team 
Member of the Senior Council, Member of the Nassau 
Herald Board. President of the Princeton Terrace Cluh 
and Chairman of the Press Club. Yale, Harvard and 
Johns Hopkins give us other splendid men on our Staff of 
Councilors. 

Such is the inspiring leadership and association for 
your boy at CAMP VEGA. Address 

WILLIAM S. HAZEL, 16 W. 47th St., N. Y. C. 




Summer Campg for Jlops- Conrtnueo 



CAMP PASSUMPSIC 

The Ideal Camp for Young Boys where the Aim is Health and Happiness. 



Illustrate d B ooJ<l et on iJeiyuest. 
WILLIAM W. CLENDEN1 N, A.M. 120 Vista Place, MT. VERNON, N.Y. 




Massachusetts, Cape Cod. 

BONNIE DUNE 

All the fun of camp, all the care of home given a few boys (8-14 
' years), on breezy, sunny, healthy Cape Cod. 

Mrs. Dwight L. Rogers, Dwight L. Rogers, Jr., Directors 
8 Parkside Road, Providence, R. I. 



New York, Woodland 

CAMP WAKE ROBIN 

Younger boys exclusively. Seventeenth season. Make your boy 
strong, happy, through an out-of-door life, including woodcraft, hiking, 
nature-lore, manual training, swimming, and all sports. Matured su- 
pervision and modern sanitation. Booklet. Mr. H. N. Little, New 
Jersey, Jersey City, Lincoln High School. 

Pennsylvania, Mehoopany. 

FERN CAMP 

FOR BOYS — 8 to 16 years old. Located in Eastern Pennsylvania. 
Baseball, tennis, boating, swimming, hikes, auto trips. Tutoring free. 
For booklet address B. M. Slater, Mehoopany, Pennsylvania. 




HELLO. BOYS, won'! you go fish- 
ing with mf and my three 
brothers, at my Dad's ramp 
this summer? It is 

WAWBEWAWA 

The Canoeing Camp for Boys 

On Squam Lake at Ashland, N. H. 

We'll go on lots of canoe trips 
and camping-out trips, in- 
stead of just loafing around 
camp and playing games. 
We'll learn how to follow a 
trail through the woods and 
up mountains; to build a 
cooking fire and mix a 
" twiBt " and toss " flap- 
jacks;" to paddle a canoe for 
fishing and cruising and 
racingand "stunts :" to make 
a browBe bed and sleep rolled 
up in a blanket under the 
stars; and we'll know how to 
hold up our heads and look the other fellows in the eye. 
Don't forget Dad's address is 

DR. JOHN B. MAY, Box 1321, Cohasset, Mass. 



CD 



CAMP ("D 
PE^NAC O OK 

N. SUTTON, N. H. 23d SEASON 

Limited number of desirable boys, ages 9 
to 16. All field and water sports. Expe- 
rienced counselors. Wholesome food. 

Address R. B. MATTERN, M.S. 
Dobbs Ferry-on-Hudson New York 



New York, Lake Chainplain 

KAMP KILL KARE 

On Lake Champlain. Two distinct camps. 15th season. 
Recreation camp for boys 8 to 16. Tutoring camp with 
separate director for boys who desire to study. 
Address Ralph F. Perry, Box M, 1535 Central Avenue, 
Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Casco, Maine, On-the-lakes. 

(~* A TV/TT3 OTTTT'O Limited to 20 boys. Real wood- 
y^fUVLIT K,f\JXL\J craft instruction. Excellent food. 
Ownership-supervision. All sports. Perfect sand-beach. Best 
camp for $200. Near Portland. Experienced college-trained 
councilors. Write, Merritt Gay, Director, Laconia, N. H. 





Lake Ca 



mp 

on J 



won 

For Boys 8 to 17 16th Season 

Location — On a 300-acre tract in the Adirondacks, 
with 5-mile lake frontage. Invigorating pme woods. A 
$75,000 equipment — Club house, indoor gym, bun- 
galow tents, athletic fields, 4 tennis courts. Sports — 
Swimming, boating, canoeing, fishing, horseback riding, 
hiking, baseball, etc. Woodcraft. Leaders— Experi- 
enced college councilors, directing instruction and sports. 
Senior and Junior departments. 

DR. I. S. MOSES 
574 West End Ave. M Director 
New York City (Til, Schuyler 5810) 



Summer Campg for Jlopg— Continueb 



<%»p IDLEWILD 

For Boys under 18 30th Season 

JOHN M. DICK, B.D., Advisory Director 
On Manhannock Island, Lake Winnipesaukee, N. H. 

Manhannock ia a regular Robinson Crusoe Island with seven miles of 
lake shore, owned and occupied exclusively by Idlewild. 

h n ?» e h!ii b0 7 S Cam , P ""l 1 an ? build ,0 « 6hl "-ks, play land and water 
baseball, row and paddle, sleep m tents and live in the open. Big speed 
boat, small motorboats, canoes, row boats and war canoes. 
Vigilance for safely Illustrated Booklet 

L. 1). ROYS. 342 Exchange Bids.. Boston, Mass, 
THE TEELA-WOOKET CAMPS FOR GIRLS 
Roxbury, Vermont. Under the same management. 




Bear Mountain Camp- 



Harrison, Maine 



For Boys 



JN the Maine pines, on the sandy shores of Bear Pond 
satisfies the most discriminating parents. Modern build- 
ings and equipment, conscientious, experienced supervision 
by mature men and women. Boys' happiness, health and 
safety are first considerations in this exceptional camp. The 
best food, personal care, land and water sports, mountain 
climbing, campcraft. Booklet. 



HAROLD J. STAPLES, Director, Biddeford, Me 




Massachusetts, Orleans, Cape Cod. 

CAMP AREY 

For Boys 

The Camp of the Sea. A home camp for boys, situated on an 
inlet from Pleasant Bay. Deep sea fishing. A fresh water lake 
nearby surrounded by pine woods. For information and arrange- 
ment tor interview address 

Wm. Bard Johnstone, Orleans, Mass. 




New Fork, Among the Thousand Islands 

CAMP WE-E-YAH-YAH 

For thirty boys. 8 to 15 years, who will have their biggest 
summer full of fun and healthful recreation; finest fishing 
all laud and water sports. Everything the best. Constant 
supervision. Booklet. 

H. H. Buxton. 20 Waverly PL. TJtica, N. T. 



New Hampshire, Fitzwilliam. 

SOUTH POND CABINS 

A camp for boys. Founded 1908 by Rollin M. Gallagher (formerly mas- 
N t 3n f X , School >- Land and water sports. Address Reginald 

Ml »l ton Ac ademy, or Mrs. Rollin M. Gallagher, North Russell St 
Milton, Mass. Telephone 1191-W. 



New Hampshire, on Lake Ossipee. 
CAMP OSSIPEE ?or Boys. 18th Season on Lake Ossipee 
n™, «■ i u-i r, in White Mts. (125 miles from Boston). 
Horses, Bicycle Hikes, Canoe trips. Ideal Swimming and Fishing 
bcience, Music, etc. Expenses moderate-Conducted like a Club by the 
Headmaster of Peekskill Military Academy. For circu'ar address 

0. E. Guild, Secretary, Nassau Place, Peekskill, N. Y 



CAMP KATAHDIN 

FOREST LAKE, SWEDEN, MAINE 
Juniors Seniors Trips Athletic Conditioning 
For Boys and Young Men 

A camp with 21 years of 
splendid traditions. 

Appointments of camp, 
simple. Real camp life. 
Health conditions excep- 
tional. Activities include 
real mountain and canoe 
trips, all branches land and 
water sports, horseback 
riding, woodcraft, naturs 
study, tutoring. 

Special athletic training 
season continues to Sep- 
tember fourteenth. 

Number limited. Refer- 
ences required. Send for 
booklet, giving age and 
pertinent facts. 



George E. Pike, B.S. 
Ralph K. Bearce, A.M. 
Duxbury, Mass. 




The St. Nicholas 

Camp Service Department 



is anxious to cooperate with CAMP OWNERS to the 
fullest extent. 

We are trying to make our service ioo% valuable, not 
only to our readers who may be going to camp, but to 
pa es announcements appear in our advertising 

Whether or not a CAMP OWNER advertises in ST 
NICHOLAS MAGAZINE, we shall be happy to ^ 
ceive any expression of opinion, the following of which 
would further the Go-to-Camp idea. 

Address 

ST. NICHOLAS MAGAZINE 

Camp Service Department 
353 Fourth Avenue New York City 



Summer Camps for Pop*— Continueb 




In the Adirondacks 

Wonderful location in the virgin forests on the shores of 
Lake Massawepie. Splendid equipment, handsome build- 
ingB, club house, bowling alleys, baseball and tennis 
grounds. Fine sand beaches, good fishing, swimming, 
athletic sports. Tutoring, forestry, woodcraft. All activ- 
ities under careful supervision. Season July 6 to Aug. 31. 
For information, apply to Lt. Col. Gttido F. Verbeck. 
SAINT JOHN'S SCHOOL 
Box S, 6. Manlius, N. Y. 



To be a Woodcrafter in personal touch 
with the real 




DAN BEARD 

is a rare privilege. Are you going to 
be one of them ? Membership limited. 

DAN BEARD WOODCRAFT CAMP 

In charge of the famous scout him- 
self. On beautiful Pennsylvania 
mountain lake. All the outdoor ac- 
tivities that boys like. Sound phys- 
ical, mental and moral training. No 
extra charge for tutoring. Specially 
endorsed by ex-President Roosevelt. 

Apply 89 Bowne Ave., Flushing,L.I.,N.Y. 



IN THE WOODS ON LAKE CHAUTAUQUA, N.Y. 

Jolly companionship amid splendid natural environment. 1500 ft. 
elevation. SeaBon 8 weeks. (Formerly on Lake Erie.) All land 
and water sports, horseback riding, hiking, dramatics. Good food; 
home care. "Write for booklet. Boys under personal direction of 



College Hill 



S. CARL STOLL 



Snyder, N. V. 



Connecticut, Bantam Lake. 

CAMP WONPOSET 



A camp for young boys 
York City. Everything 
Write for camp book. 

ROBERT TIND ALE, 31 East 71st iSt 



i the Berkshires, 100 miles from New 
boy can wish for. $25,000 equipment. 



New York City. 




Camp Winnecook for Boys 

Lake Winnecook, Unity, Maine 

1 9th Season. Athletic fields for all Sports. Horseback riding, 
canoeing, sailing, motor-cruising, Indian tribes, head-dress 
for deeds of valor. Indian pageant. Archery, wood-craft, 
auto trips, hikes. Boy Scouts. Photography; Arts and 
Crafts. Tents and bungalows in pines. Every boy takes 
part in everything. 

One price — No extras. Send for booklet. 

Herbert L. Rand, T3 Hemenway Road, Salem, Mass. 




New York, Catskill Mountains. 

KYLE CAMP FOR BOYS 



( Midgets 6 to 
■\ Juveniles 10 
( Juniors 14 tc 



10 to 13 
to 16 

Model bungalows ; no damp tents. All land and water sports. U. S. 
rifle range; Military drill. Two baseball diamonds. Amusement hall. 
Scout masters. Physician and nurse. Your boy's health, diversion 
and amusement are well looked after. An expenditure of $30,000.00 
turned this ideal place into a paradise for boys. 

Address Dr. Paul Kyle, Kyle School fob Boys, 
lrvington-on-Hudson, 22 miles from New York. Bos 500. 



one of 



Massachusetts, Northampton. 

Camp Norridgewock fefgra^Lkkes a 

the Maine Woods. Our Counselors are trained Physical Directors. Fish- 
ing, canoe trips, baseball, swimming and tutoring. Special oversight 
by a camp mother for younger boys. Boys eight to sixteen years. 
Illustrated booklet. Arthur M. Condon. 




Los Alamos Ranch 

A Wonderful Summer Camp 

On a big ranch high up in the. cool Rocky Moun- 
tains. Pack train trips under a former Forest 
Officer through the greatest mountain country in 
America. Excellent trout fishing. A week at the 
round-up in the cow camp. Limited to 18 boys, 
better write at once for folder. Address 

A. J. CONNELL, Director 
Los Alamos Ranch, Otowi, P.O., New Mexico 



Summer Camps for Jlopg— Continued 




LENAPE 

The Pennsylvania Camp for Boys 

An ideal camp on crystal clear Lake Arthur in the heart 
of the Poconos. Conveniently reached. Group limited. 
Splendid equipment. Only bovs' camp in Pennsyl- 
vania giving horse-back riding. Every activity, athletics, 
swimming, aquaplaning, boating, hikes, woodcraft, auto 
trips, etc. Resident physician. Experienced councillors 
Associated with the well-known Oneka Camps. Write 
for booklet. 

ERNEST W. SIPPLE 
350 West Duval Street, Germantown, Phila., Pa. 




Massachusetts, Ashland. 

BOB-WHITE For b °y s under 15 - Seventh 
season. Horseback riding thru 
woodland trails, tennis tournaments, athletic fields, camp- 
ing trips, boating, etc. Illlustrated booklet. 

R. C. Hill. S. B. Hayes. 




CAMP WANDA 

Kezar Lake, Lovell, Maine 

Foothills of the White Mts. 

OYS 9 to 15. Complete 
equipment. Personal su- 
pervision. Mature and 
experienced councilors. Canoe and mountain 
trips. Swimming, paddling, fishing, hiking, 
tennis, nature work, woodcraft. Wholesome 
food. Regulated sports. Camp mother. 

Booklet and terms address 

Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Smith 
161 Albemarle Street Springfield, Mass. 




CAMP KINAPIK 



The Woodcraft Camp for Boys from 8 to 18 
ON LAKE KEZAR, MAINE 

Come to the lakes, woods and rivers of Maine; the White Moun- 
? CW Ham P 6hir ?- Swimming, fishing. Council fires. 
Secrets of camp and woods. Mountain trips and camps Canoe 
trips near and far. Wilderness and special trips for older boys 
Age groups. Particular supervision. Eesident physician. Camp 
mother. Endorsed by Ernest Thompson Seton. For illustrated 
booklet, address HARVEY C. WENT. Director, Bridgeport, Conn. 



New Hampshire, West Swanzey. 

"THE OLD HOMESTEAD" CAMP 

Swanzey Lake, West Swanzey, N. H. Exclusive camp for 
boys (8-18 years) Former summer home of late Denman 
Inompson. $50,000 equipment; bowling alleys, stables theatre 
parents bungalow. All camp activities under skilled leader- 
ship. Excellent table a specialty. College men wanted to 
act as councilors. Catalogue. 

CARROLL N. JONES 
South Windsor, Conn. After May 1, West'Swanzey, N. H. 




POLE BRIDGE CAMP 

Matamoras, Pike Co., Penn. 

A rugged vacation in the forests of the Water Gap region 
overlooking the Delaware, only 90 miles from N. Y. Modern 
equipment. Mountain, water and indoor sports For 25 
Boys, 8 to 14 yrs. Booklet. E. Hoyt Palmer Manager, 
75 Yale Sta., New Haven, Conn. 



CAMP WILDMERE ?T 6 

Long Lake Harrison, Maine 

In Sebago Lake region. 21st season. 48 acres on sheltered cove 
■16 miles waterway for canoe and launch trips. Every sport abov 
wants. Develops self-reliance, manliness, fair play robust phy- 
sique. Permanent buildings, tents. Large athletic fields. Spring 
water, best food. Christian auspices. 
Booklet. 

IRVING S. WOODMAN 
6 Wesl82nd St., New York 




O, Boys! 



The camps are planning for you already. 
Are YOU planning for them? 



Will you fill out this coupon at once so that boys and camp directors can plan together ? 

ST. NICHOLAS CAMP EDITOR Name of camp I have attended 

353 Fourth Avenue, New York City Name 

Please have information about camps sent to me. Address 

My age is Location desired - 

Largs or small camp... Parent' s Signature _ _.. 



Summer Camps! for Jlopsi— Continued 



:■• '■'■''issr-^f 




CAMP MONADNOCK 



Jaffrey, N. H. 
Juniors 8-12 



Eighth Season 
Seniors 12-16 



Do you want your boy to know the joy of camping out in real 
woods, to swim and paddle like an Indian, become skilled in 
first-aid, handling of tools signalling, woodcraft, and excel in 
athletic games? Mature college men will help and safeguard 
him in these activities. Extensive equipment. Careful selection 
of boys. Prominent physicians among patrons. Illustrated 
booklet. 

FRED'K ERNST, Director 



Westminster School 



Simsbury, Connecticut 



CAMP WILDWOOD 

"A Boy's Paradise" 
Fish Creek . . Wisconsin 

All athletic activities, water sports, splendid table, 
and every care that a parent could give. May we 
send our brochure, "Camp Wildwood"? Camp opens 
July ist, closes August 25th. Address W. B. Bird, 
1594 Rydal Mount Road, Cleveland Heights, Ohio. 



New Jersey, Bordentown. 
n /tttvttvtt? TiTAiirA Summer Camp for Boys and Young Men. 
MI JN JN O.- W AW A Located at Lake of Two Rivers, Algonquin 
Provincial Park, in the heart of Ontario Highlands. Unsurpassed for fishing, 
canoeing, observation of nature and wild animal photography. Just the 
camp you have been looking for. Wholesome, moral atmosphere. Highest 
references. Reasonable terms. Write for booklet D. W. L. Wise, Ph.B. 

Thousand Island 
Park Camp 

For boys under 18 

The Camp is at Thousand Island Park on Wellesley Island, lying in the 
historic and beautiful St. Lawrence River not far from the foot of Lake 
Ontario. Excursion boats make regular trips among the Thousand Islands 
and out into Lake Ontario. 

Splendid accommodations are secured in cottages with all modern con- 
veniences. Electric lights, baths and home cooking assure comfort and 
health. Baseball diamonds, tennis courts, horse-back riding, swimming, 
motor boating, canoeing, etc. Separate camps for Juniors and Seniors. 
Expert supervision of all activities. Resident physician, dentist and 
nurse. Address 

WALTER C. CROUCH, Friends Central School 

ISth and Race Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 




CAMP TY-GLYN 



A SUMMER CAMP FOR BOYS — 
7 to 16 

MOWYN LAKE, ROOSEVELT, WIS. 

Horseback riding, tennis, canoe trips with guides, swimming, 
baseball, basket-ball, manual training, wireless telegraphy. All 
counselors college men, each one a specialist. For booklet, write 
to G. A. ROGER, 700 W. Euclid Avenue, Detroit, Michigan. 



PINE BLUFF 
CAMP 




Pine Bluff Camp 

for Boys 

At Port Jefferson, Long island, N. Y. 

24 Years' Experience 



V-' g °" r '" : ." ~^ Horseback riding, sailing, 3 
large floats for swimming. Experienced coun- 
cillors to intelligently teach every sport and 
game that tends to develop young manhood. 

Illustrated Booklet 

H. S. Pettit, M.D., 106 Gates Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Camp Savanhaka for Girls under same management 
Camps five miles apart. 



ASH-NO-CA 

"A BOYS' CLUB" 

IN THE MOUNTAINS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Not aschool, not a camp, but a place planned, equipped, 
and conducted for ohe pleasure and physical and moral 
welfare of boys under seventeen during the summer. 
Delightful climate. No mosquitoes. Sports include hik- 
ing, mountain climbing, camping, canoeing, swimming, 
boating, tennis, baseball, track, golf, EVERYTHING 
A BOY LIKES. Fine buildings furnish healthful 
sleeping accommodations and other buildings ample 
place for recreation in wet weather. Boys have best 
possible care. Large farm furnishes abundance of 
wholesome food. 714 acre tract. 

Address George Jackson, Asheville School - Asheville, N.C. 



Camps; for Cfnlbren 



MACH-A-WA-MACH 

The Children's Camp Catskill-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

The old Van Vechten estate at Catskill has been converted into 
a charming summer home for girls 3 to 14 years and boys 3 to 10. 
Camp limited to 50; councilor for every 4. Complete equipment; 
boating and all suitable sports. Folk and "baby" dances, pageant- 
ry. Military training for boys. Grace T. Lapham, Director. 

The Mothers' Helper and Elementary School 

870 Riverside Drive, (160th Street) N. Y. Tel., Audubon 435 



BEACON 

Separate Camps for Juniors and Seniors 

Hillsview for Boys 
Hillcrest for Girls 

15 miles from Boston in 
the Blue Hill region. 65 
acres of athletic fields, 
farms and woodland. All 
land and water sports. 
Horseback riding. Music 
and art are a vital part of 
the camp life for all camp- 
ers. Tutoring. Dancing, „*- 
pantomime a n <1 indoor 
guinea. Hikes, trips o tin- 
ocean. Under the- direction : " :f "' : 
of Beacon School, Address V < *T n ~ZlL3k» 

MRS. ALTHEA H. ANDREW, Director 
1440 Beacon St. Brookline, Mass. 




Going to School 

OCTOBER'S frosty days with their tang of burning leaves, their 

tL me^H " t , h6ir ^° ra ^ chi11 coJe soon enough 

I hat means a new school time is on its way, even though June brings 
its good byes to books and class room for this summer. g 
Before us all are months of vacation and play, in which to enjoy camp, 

seashore or wherever we may be. During . 
this time school plans for next year must 
be made; and those plans are most im- 
portant. 

School days are drudgery days, unless 
boys or girls like their school. After all 
there's a side to school life that means 
good fun — the kind of fun that we all 
thoroughly enjoy. School does not mean 
only lessons, books and study and work. 
That's only a part. Without the other 
part — the fun side — any undertaking 
would be a dismal thing indeed. 

We feel that every boy or girl likes to 
help choose the things that pertain to 
11 „ 7 . r , themselves, whether clothes, books, camps 

or school. We also feel that many, many times their opinions are ex- 
treme y valuable and go far in helping parents to arrive at a happy solu- 
tion of the school problem. y 

St. Nicholas is carrying in its School Department splendid schools — 
where every boy or girl will find things they like. These schools adver- 
tise m your own magazine" because they know how important is the 
approval of you boys and girls. 

Are you going away to school this fall ? If you 
are, tell mother and father the kind of school 
you like, the things you want to do, along 
with your reasons. They will be glad for your 
assistance, and in the family conferences, you 
will find school difficulties soon disappear. ' 

Our St. Nicholas School Department is 
always ready to do whatever it may to help from 
its store of information about schools. Write 
us and our heartiest cooperation will be most 
willingly given. 







TJLVEFT 



MILITARY 
ACADEMY 



Culver is for the ambitious boy — the boy 
who goes whole-heartedly into his work. It 
demands much of its students, but it gives 
much in return. Culver seeks the best in a 
boy and brings it out. Culver men are leaders 
in college and business. 

The amazingly complete equipment and 
splendid staff of teachers are unsurpassed 
^ . for the whole development of 

**Wj|k fc the boy. Emphasis placed 

iHmm. college preparatory work. 
^^MB 1 "^, Athletics and outdoor 

life build strong bodies. 
■Mr For catalogue, address 

THE PRESIDENT'S AIDE 
Culver, Indiana 





Stamford Military 
Academy 

A preparatory school that pursues sound educational 
methods and provides a thorough training for mind and 
body. Located at Ossining overlooking the Hudson, con- 
venient to New York, the situation is ideal. 

Every power is bent toward the complete development 
of each student. Classes are purposely small and boys are 
assured individual consideration from every teacher. In- 
structors are chosen for their moral force as well as for 
their skill. 

The locality permits every kind of outdoor sport and the 
gymnasium is well equipped for all indoor exercise. Summer 
Camp. For catalog address 

WALTER D. GERKEN, A.M., Principal 
Ossining, New York 





TENACRE 



A Country School for Young Girls 
from Ten to Fourteen Years of Age 

PREPARATORY to Dana Hall. 
Fourteen miles from Boston. All 
sports and athletics supervised and 
adapted to the age of the pupil. The 
finest instruction, care and influence. 

Miss Helen Temple Cooke 

Dana Hall, Wellesley, Mass. 



frtftoofe for l&apii anb <&tr Is— Continue* 




Los Alamos Ranch School 

Combines school work under the best masters ob- 
tainable with wonderful outdoor life, Sly 
supervised, on a big Western Ranch in the pine 
covered mountains of New Mexico. The most 
healthful climate in America. An ideal SchoolTnd 
in Summer a most wonderful Camp. Write for W 
let, state which is wanted School P r CtaS? Address 

A. J. Connell, Director. 
LOS ALAMOS RANCH SCHOOL, 
Buckman, Santa Fe County, New Mexico. 



Woodland Park 



Juni 




or Department of Lasell Seminary 
For Girls under IS 

A course of study covering all sran, 
mar grades, fitting girls for Lasel 
Seminary and other secondary schools. 
-Buildings splendidly equipped for the 
needs and comforts of young people 
filass-enclosed sun-parlors and class- 
rooms. Gymnasium and swimming 
pool Ilaygrouuds for all activities. 
Catalog on application. 

Camp Teconnet opens July 1st. 
GUY M. WINSLOW, Ph.D., 
Principal 
CHAS. F. TOWNE, A.M., 
Assoc. Principal 
Woodland Road 
Auburndale Massachusetts 




The Hedges 

tu t ■ c t NORTON, MASS. 

R^f Jum r? Sch ,° o1 °J House in ,he Pi "«. 30 miles from 
S,?n^ n ', F °f glrl f " nder fourt ^n. A large modern horn™ 
Sun parlors for class rooms. Play fields. Horseback rid 
>ng. Swimming. A wholesome, simple life of stifdy arid 
Sw? to do™ QUiCk t0 fed ' anxi0 »« to know 

MISS GERTRUDE E. CORNISH, Principal 



MASSEE ( S Y EASTFORD 



On Long Island Sound 
o<! minutes from New York. 

lrhnl° VS f uc ? essl ^y Prepared for college 'and scientific 
- !'" - Junior Department for boys over 7 One 

teacher to 12 boys. 
Attractive buildings, 
with beautiful, 
1 5-acre campus. 
All sports. 

W.W.MASSEE, Ph.D. 
Box 500, 

Stamford 
Conn. 



The School 
for a Boy 

For the development of manly boys 
into good citizens— leaders of men, by 
a rational system of training mind, 
morals and body. Work, self-respon- 
sibility, a clean, healthy body and a 
vigorous, well-balanced mind belong 
to Eastford boys. College preparation 
or vocational training. Catalogue. 

STANLEY KELLEY, Director 

Pomfret, Conn. 




en Gables 

The home built by the Mary Lyon 
School so that little girls may have 
a school like older sisters. For the 
ideal development of the young 
girl through intimate care and at- 
tention. Constant mother love and 
guidance. Work and play have 
equal place in the girl's growth, 
healthful, open-countrysurround- 
ings. Seven gables for girls, 11-14 
WiUcrest for smaller girls, 6-11 
Booklet on request. 

Mr. & Mrs. H. M. CRIST, Principals 
Bo* 1542 Swarthmore, Pa. 

Ofa JUNIOR SCHOOL of^i 

the MARY LYON SCHOOL 





■ft. SCHOOL For Boys 

Frederick L. Carnage, Headmaster 
64 miles from New York on Harlem R R 
Complete Equipment. 
1 borough preparation for College and Scientific 
Schools. 



„.„„ Send for Catalogue 

PAWLING SCHOOL PAVY 



PAWLING, N. Y. 



gkljools: (or Jlops; anb Atrial — Continueo 




The Mitchell Military Boys School 

A school that appeals to the young American boy and the dis- 
criminating parent. Exponents of clean sport, fair play, and 
thorough work. Development and maintenance of health con- 
sidered of first importance. Military training adapted to the 
age of our boys. Preparatory to larger secondary schools. 
Equipment modern and complete. 100 acres. 
ALEXANDER H. MITCHELL, Principal, Box S, Billerica, Mass. 




Allen Military School 

A country, college preparatory school, 9 miles from Boston. 
The group system prevails. Gymnasium, swimming pool, con- 
crete rink, and three athletic fields. Upper and Lower Schools. 
THOMAS CBALMEBS, A.B., D.D., Director 
Portsmouth Military School Under Same Management 
437 WALTHAM ST., WEST NEWTON, MASS. 



New York, Cazenovia 

THE CAZENOVIA SEMINARY 

Co-educational. A College Preparatory and Finishing School 
of the highest type. Founded 1824. Endowed. All Athletics. 

Separate cottages and supervision for junior boys and girls 
ten years of age and upwards. A wonderful climate for health. 
A wonderful country for outdoor sports. Trained nurse. 

Charles E. Hamilton, D.D., President. 

Connecticut, Cornwall. 

RUMSEY HALL 

A School for Boys under 15. Yearly rate $1200. 

L. R. Sanford, Principal. 

Louis H. Schctte, M.A., Headmaster. 



PAGE 

MILITARY ACADEMY 

A Big School for Little Boys 
Military life appeals to youngsters — 
at Page it is combined with work and 
play that develop initiative and self- 
reliance. The growing mind is guided by 
wise men and women who thoroughly 
understand boys. Every advantage of 
climate and location. Large modern 
buildings; seven acre campus. Let our 
catalog tell you all about us. Boys 
grow big and strong in California. 

ROBERT A. GIBBS, Headmaster 

Route 7, Box 947 
LOS ANGELES CALIFORNIA 



Powder Point School 

Will Understand Your Boy 

— and help him to uuderstand himself. Thorough i 
struction. Cleau, snappy athletics for 
every boy. Clearest understanding be- 
tween boys and masters. Prepares for 
college and gives strong gen- 
eral course. Ages 10 to 19. 
Number limited to sixty. 
Boys must furnish evidence 
of good character. Unique 
location on seashore. Con- 
venient to Boston. Address 

RALPH K. BEARCE, A.M. 
Headmaster 
27 King Caesar Road 
Dux bury, Mass. 





Tobe 

Casftle 





Miss Mason's Summer School 

This well-known school is offering exceptional courses for summer 
work. The ideal location affords a splendid opportunity for recrea- 
tion and study. Beautiful and historical Tarrytown is a wonderful 
place for a summer vacation. On the Hudson river. 45 minutes 
from Fifth Avenue. Fine courses in Secretarial work. Business 
Methods for Women. Music, Art. Dancing and Authorship. Em- 
phasis placed on tutoring for college entrance. Catalogue for 
summer or regular winter school sent on request. 

Address Box 725 
For Girls and Women Tarrytown-on-Hudson, N. Y. 



Massachusetts, Berkshire. 



CRESTALBAN 



A school for little girls in the invigorating 
climate of the Berkshires. Thirty minutes 
from Pittsfield. 200 acres, 3 buildings. Number limited. Special care 
given to home training, character development, and health. Open air 
classes. Outdoor sports. Miss Margery Whiting, Principal, Berk- 
shire, Mass. 



New Jersey, Orange. 

MISS BEARD'S SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

A country school, 13 miles from New York. College preparatory, special 
courses. Music, Art, Domestic Arts and Science. Supervised physical 
work in gymnasium and field. Catalog on request. 

Address Miss Lucie C. Beard. 



Q ^Vfary %)fi School 

The whole school life is surrounded with such comforts and con- 
veniences as intensify a girl's natural love for a well-kept, cultured 
home. 

College preparation and general courses. Special work in Music, 
Household and Fine Arts. Graduate courses for girls finishing 
secondary school. A separate booklet for Mary Lyon School — 
Wildcliff, the Graduate School — Seven Gables, the Junior School. 

Mr. and Mrs. 
H. M. CRIST, 
Principals 




i&cfjoote for Pops; anb &ivl&— Continueb 




The Ely School for Girls 

ELY COURT 
GREENWICH CONNECTICUT 

In the country, one hour from 
New York City. Twenty-five 
acres, modern equipment. Col- 
lege Preparatory, General, Sec- 
retarial and Post-Graduate 
Courses. Music. Household arts. 
Daily work in the studio. Horse- 
back riding and all summer and 
winter sports. Sleeping Porch. 



Rhode Island, Providence. 
The Mary C. Wheeler Town and Country School 

T^r+= 0Wn sch ° o1 offerm g opportunities for country life and 
Providence, Rhode Island. 



sports. 




DUMMER ACADEMY 

SOUTH BYFIELD, MASS. 

159th year. 35 miles from Boston. 370 acres for sports and life in 
the open. Military drill. Athletic field, golf course, tennis court, 
hockey pond, salt water sports. Separate building and school for 
boys from 10 to 14. Play and school life carefully planned accord- 
ing to the needs of each boy. Infirmary. For catalogue address 
CHARLES S. INGHAM, Ph.D. 



PEDDIE 



An Endowed 
School for Boys 



The endeavor of every Ped- 
die boy is to excel in work 
and student life. Peddie 
boys have carried this spir- < 
it of leadership into 26 
colleges in classrooms and 
student activities. At Ped- 
die a boy'sathleticactivity 
and studies are based on 
his physical and mental 
condition shown by rigid 
tests of body and mind. 
Splendid gymnasium, 
swimming pool, 60-acre campus. 
College preparation. Lower 
school for bovs under 14. Sum- 
mer session July 11 to Sept. 2. 56th year. For booklets addres 

ROGER W. SWETLAND, LL.D. Headmaster 
Box GM Hightstown, N. J. 





Southfield Point Hall 

r i A School , for Girls - Beautifully situated on Long 
Island bound at Southfield Point. Intermediate, general, 
and college preparatory courses. Music, gymnastics, 
athletics, and sports. Horseback riding, skating, skiin» 
52 minutes from Grand Central Station, New York 
Limited enrollment. 

JESSIE CALLAM GRAY, B. A., Principal 
BERNICE TOWNSEND PORTER, Asst. Principal 
10 Davenport Drive, Stamford, Connecticut 





HILLSIDE 

A School for Girls 
Norwalk Connecticut 

Provides normal development of girls — intellectual, moral, 
social — in a refined home which offers every comfort. College 
preparatory and special courses. Upper and Lower Schools 
Numbers limited. High, sightly location in six acres of forest and 
fruit trees. Ample playgrounds. Gymnasium. 

Send for catalog and View Book.] 

Margaret R. Brendlinger, A. B. Vassar 
Vida Hunl Francis, A. B. Smith, Principals 





g>d)00te for pops anb #trte— Conttnueb 




HOWARD S 



A Famous Old New England Country School 

Twenty-five miles from Boston. College Preparation. General Courses. Domestic Science and Home Management 
Strong Courses in Instrumental and Vocal Music. Modern Languages. The school, home and gymnasium are each 
in separate buildings. Large new sleeping porch. Fine new Y. W. C. A. swimming pool. Military drill. Horseback 
riding, excellent canoeing, trips afield. Extensive grounds. All sports. Live teachers. Upper and lower school, so pupils. 
For catalogue *^ss^^ & p KENDALL, Principals, 28 Howard St., WEST BRIDGEWATER, MASS. 




Massachusetts, Bradford. 

JUNIOR BRADFORD 

A preparatory school for Bradford Academy. Directed study and play. 
Arts and crafts. All advantages of Bradford Academy equipment, for 
booklets address The Principal, 139 Main Street, Bradford, Mass. 



51 



FOR GIRLS 



We offer, with diploma, Academic, College 
Preparatory, Art, Music, Dramatic, Secretarial 
and Home-making Courses, including Horti- 
culture. 

Students may enter regular courses or, with 
parents' approval, may specialize as desired. In 
beautiful Westchester, 30 miles from New York. 
53rd year. Write for Year Book. Address 
Ossining-on-Hudson, New York. Box 6N. 

CLARA C. FULLER, Principal 



FARM I NGTON 



MAINE 



Abbott School 

"The boy at Abbott lives" 

Athletics on a field that would be a credit to 
any college. Hiking, camping, snowshoeing, 
skiing. 

Small classes insure rapid and thorough work. 
Prepares for business but emphasizes college 
preparation. 

Modern methods with old-fashioned thor- 
oughness. 

Fall term opens September 28th. 

Catalog on request. 
MOSES BRADSTREET PERKINS, Headmaster 



Pennsylvania, Lancaster. 

Franklin and Marshall Academy 

Prepares boys for all Colleges and Technical Schools. Complete modern 
Equipment and good Physical Training Department. Old established 
School on basis allowing moderate terms. Catalogue on request. 

Address E. M. Hartman, Principal, Box 432, Lancaster, Pa. 




BEACON 

A Country-City Boarding and Day School 

For Boys and Girls of All Ages 

Distinctly college preparatory, covering all 
grades from kindergarten "to college. Special 
diploma courses for students not wishing to 
enter college. Household Arts, Music, Art, Sec- 
retarial and Business Courses. Faculty of ex- 
perienced college graduates. 3-acre estate with 
S buildings in Boston's most beautiful suburb. 
85 acres and 5 buildings in the Blue Hill region, 
15 miles from Boston. Hillsview, the school's 
summer camp, is used for week end sports and 
games. For catalog address 

MRS. ALTHEA H. ANDREW, Principal 
1440 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 




Whiting 
Hall 



A Country Home School for Girls 

from eight to sixteen, affiliated with the best preparatory schools. Twenty- 
six acres, new buildings, ideal location, high elevation — halfway between 
Boston and Worcester, near Longfellow's Wayside Inn. Outdoor sleeping 
and class rooms, if desired. Individual care. Teachers for all branches. 
Mistress of field games. House mother. Family life emphasized. 
MR. ELBRIDGE C. WHITING, Amherst, Yale, MRS. WHITING, Wellesley, Prins. 
12 CONCORD ROAD, SOUTH SUDBURY, MASS. 




£>cfjool8 for Jlopa anb #trte— Continueb 



NationalBvrkSeminary 

for Young Women. Washington, D. C. Subarbs 
JAMES E. AMBNT, Ph. I)., LI..D.. President 

Presents the fundamentals of a college education in a two- 
year diplomacourse. Music, Art, Expression, Domestic Sci- 
ence and other vocational courses. Athletics, Gymnasium, 
swimming pool, outdoor sports, riding. 18 minutes from 
Washington, D.C. Thirty-two buildings on an eighty-five acre 
campus make a home where cultured environment, healthy 
surroundings, and democratic ideals mould the well-bred girl 
of today into the comprehensive woman of tomorrow. An 
early enrollment is urged. Catalogue. Address 

Registrar, Box 165, Forest Glen, Maryland 




Miss Hall's 

SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

In the Berkshire Hills, on 
the Holmes Road to Lenox. 
Forty-five acres. One thou- 
sand feet above the sea level. 

Miss MIRA H. HALL, Principal 
Pittsfield, Massachusetts 



€4 



STAMMERING 

lis (aMse aj\d ©re 99 

You can be quickly cured if you stammer. Send 10 cents, coin 
or stamps, for 288 page cloth bound book on Stammering and 
Stuttering. It tells how I cured myself after Stammering and 
Stuttering for 20 years. BENJAMIN N. BOG U E 
■j 479 Boflue Building, 1147 N. III. St. IndlanapoMsi 




FOR SALE 

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ROCKVILLE CENTRE, L. L, N. Y. 



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Post-Office Address 
353 Fourth Avenue 
New York, N. Y. 
Scarsdale, N. Y. 



Statement of the Ownership 
Management, Circulation, Etc. 
Required by the Act of Congress 
of August 24, 1912 

of St. Nicholas 

published monthly at Concord, N. H., 

For April 1st, 1921 

County of New York ( 
State of New York t SS ' 

Before me, a Notary Public in and for the State and County 
aforesaid, personally appeared W. Morgan Shuster, who, 
having been duly sworn according to law, deposes and says 
that he is the President of The Century Co., publisher of St. 
Nicholas, and that the following is, to the best of his knowledge 
and belief, a true statement of the ownership, management 
(and if a daily paper, the circulation), etc., of the aforesaid 
publication for the date shown in the above caption, required 
by the Act of August 24, 1912, embodied in section 443, Postal 
Laws and Regulations, printed on the reverse of this form, to 
wit: 

1. That the names and addresses of the publisher, editor, managing 
editor, and business managers are: 

Name of 
Publisher, The Century Co. 

Editor, William Fayal Clarke, 
Managing Editor, None 
Business Managers, None 

2. That the owners are: (Give name and addresses of individual 
owners, or, if a corporation, give its name and the names and addresses 
of stockholders owning or holding 1 per cent or more of the total amount 
of stock.) 

Owners, The Century Co., 

353 Fourth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
Stockholders: W. Morgan Shuster, 353 Fourth Avenue 
New York, N. Y.; William W. Ellsworth, New Hartford, 
Conn.; Geo. L. Wheelock, 353 Fourth Avenue, New York, 
N. Y.; Robert Underwood Johnson, 327 Lexington Avenue 
New York, N. Y.; Donald Scott, 9 East 9th Street, New York 
N. Y.; Edith True Drake. 17 East 8th Street, New York, N. Y • 
W. F. Clarke, Scarsdale, N. Y.; George H. Hazen, 381 Fourth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y.; Gardner Hazen, 353 Fourth Avenue 
New York, N. Y.; Marie Louise Chichester, 501 West 120th 
Street, New York, N. Y.; The Pennsylvania Company, Trustee 
for Josephine Kern Dodge, Philadelphia, Penna.; Estate of 
Roswell Smith, 253 Broadway, New York, N. Y.; Estate of 
Annie G. Smith, 253 Broadway, New York, N. Y.; W. J. Wash- 
burn, Jr., 353 Fourth Avenue, New York, N. Y.; James Abbott 
353 Fourth Avenue, New York, N. Y.; Stella S. Chichester, 46 
Kilburn Road, Garden City, N. Y.; A. C. Ferrin, Chester, 
Mass.; Dana H. Ferrin, 353 Fourth Avenue, New York, N. Y.; 
Herbert Adams Gibbons, 12 Boudinot Street, Princeton, N J ■ 
G. Inness Hartley, 344 West 87th Street, New York, N. Y.; 
Lucy Wheelock, 100 Riverway, Boston, Mass.; Don M. Parker] 
Brixton Road, Garden City, N. Y. j 

3. That the known bondholders, mortgagees, and other security holders, 
owning or holding 1 per cent or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages, 
or other securities are: (If there are none, so state.) None. 

4. That the two paragraphs next above, giving the names of the owners, 
stockholders, and security holders, if any, contain not only the list of 
stockholders and security holders as they appear upon the books of the 
company but also, in cases where the stockholder or security holder ap- 
pears upon the books of the company as trustee or in any other fiduciary 
relation, the name of the person or corporation for whom such trustee is 
acting, is given; also that the said two paragraphs contain statements 
embracing affiant's full knowledge and belief as to the circumstances and 
conditions under which stockholders and security holders who do not 
appear upon the books of the company as trustees, hold stock and securities 
in a capacity other than that of a bona fide owner; and this affiant has no 
reason to believe that any other person, association, or corporation has 
any interest direct or indirect in the said stock, bonds or other securities 
than as so stated by him. 

THE CENTURY CO. 
(Signed) W. Morgan Shuster, President, 
(Signature of Publisher) 
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 29th day of March, 
21. Mary E. Taylok, 

Notary Public, residing in Queens County, N. Y., 
Queens County Register's No. 1032, New York 
(Seal) County Clerk's No. 246, New York County Regis- 
ter's No. 2178. 

(My commission expires March 30, 1922.) 



SINCE GRANDFATHER TOOK UP GOLF- 





All the family's playing the grand old Scotch game. It's a regular 
epidemic, and the doctors are helpless — it has them too. 
Quite naturally all the family talks golf and reads golf; its a part 
of the game. And equally as naturally they read 

THE AMERICAN GOLFER, THE SPORT PICTORIAL 

America's leading publication on sports. For besides golf it covers 

tennis, trapshooting, rowing and other outdoor sports. 

Also it carries in each and every issue a competent and interesting 

article of instruction on how to improve your game. 

Are you a subscriber to this live, up-to-date magazine, edited by 

Grantland Rice, the leading sport writer of the country? If not, 

why not get in line today? 

The coupon below makes it easy to subscribe. 



I CENTURION PUBLISHERS, Inc. (^JSfflgJ, 

353 Fourth Avenue VjOlrcr 

New York, N. Y. |92j 

Dear Sirs: Please enter my subscription for one year to THE 
AMERICAN GOLFER, THE SPORT PICTORIAL (bi-weekly) 
for which I agree to pay $5.00 (Five Dollars). 



Name - 

Street.. ■ 

Town Stale 



I NOTE — The subscription rate for Canada is $5.50; Foreign countries $6.00. 
I 



Before the child's fifth year 

Occur most of those injuries to the psychic fife which are the real reason why 
Z^IsstST 1PPed HUman bCln§S d ° ^ ° btain SatisfaCti °- — heahhlnd" 



Lack of miUative and confidence defective response to human contacts, wrong 
eac ions to happenings over-developed egoism, self-depreciation, timidity-prac" 
tically every kind of mal-adaptation of the human being to his environment has 
its roots in some conflict of the psychic life. 1 nas 

Suppressed, covered up, forgotten by the conscious mind, but playing terrible havoc 
m that layer of the psychic existence below the level of conscious thought which 
is called "the sub-conscious," these troubles manifest themselves in every sort on 
inefficiency for happy life. Frequently the trouble is expressed in bo^aL" 

Tn^fdSer fC1Sn ^ SymPt ° mS ° f ° rSaniC but ™« — y 



The careful father and moth 



er 



if they knew about the nature and seriousness of these conflicts, could do as much to 
guide, to explain, to avert, as they do in the protection of the physical life W 
without-knowledge can do its worst in just this connection, and those who wtn to 
be good parents to their children should not rest content with the totany wrong 

Xr s ~ut y S m CaSUaI ^ ° f ^ FrCUdian disC0VeHeS about the 

Should seek information 

For this purpose there has not been until now an altogether suitable book, but 
Dr. Josephrne A. Jackson, who for ten years has been searching out and curbs 

able) after they have done all sorts' of harm, has written-with Helen M. Salisbury 

OUTWITTING 

OUR NERVES 

A book which every mother and every father of a child should read. Send for it today. 
It is a 12mo of 300 pages. Price $2.50 

pub. ish ed by THE CENTURY CO. N e wY„ tk c ity 

At All Bookstores 




Take St. Nicholas With You 



IF you went away to camp or to your vacation 
playground, and left behind your baseball kit, 
fishing-tackle, golf-clubs, or bathing-suit, you 
would feel a bit "lost." 

You '11 feel the same way on days you want 
to idle under shady trees, or pass in the house 
when the rain comes down, if you are without 
your copy of St. Nicholas. 

"St. Nick" is the year-round companion, 
guide, and friend to thousands and thousands of 
boys and girls — in this country and all over the 
world. He really fits in so well that he is one of 
the family, and no one would think of leaving 
him at home! 

Of course, if you don't know the joy of read- 
ing St. Nicholas regularly, if you don't have 
your own copy fresh from the printer, it 's easy 
to join the great army of the Saint's own boys 
and girls — and what a jolly, happy group it is! 
Tell your mother or father how much you are 
missing by not having St. Nicholas come every 
month, and they will be glad to send your name 
and #4.00 for a year's subscription. 





If He Didn't 
Wear Holeproofs 

Mother would have lots 
more darning to do 

T>UT Holeproofs are sturdy stockings, 
made of super-strong yarns — specially 
knitted. And it takes worlds of hard wear 
to make them call for the darning needle. 

They outwear ordinary stockings nearly 
two to one. And thousands of mothers 
will tell you so. 

Ribbed Holeproof for the children. All 
the popular shades in Pure Silk, Silk Faced 
and Lusterized Lisle for the grown-ups. 

Less darning — less stocking expense for 
all the family, and better looking stockings. 

Look for the Holeproof label — -it identi- 
fies the genuine. 

HOLEPROOF HOSIERY COMPANY 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
Holeproof Hosiery Co. of Canada, Limited, London, Ont. 

HPLEPRoPF 

Hosier/ - 




Your Foot's a 
Good Scout, too. 

AS long as your foot has room to stretch 
l\ comfortably, it's perfectly willing 
to have you hike all day. 

But it can't keep willing in narrow, 
pointed shoes that grind you at every 
step. ^ Such shoes give people corns, bun- 
ions, ingrowing nails, and fallen arches. 

Tell Mother to keep you in Educators — 
the shoes that "let the feet grow as thev 
should." 

Send in a post card for a free book — 
"Bent Bones Make Frantic Feet." It 
tells you a lot about how to look after 
your feet. 



Rice & Hutchins, Inc., 1 7 High St., Boston, Mass. 




FOR MEN, WOMEN, and CHILDREN 



ST. NICHOLAS 



No 8 



JUNE, 1921 

Copyright, 1921, by The Century Co. All rights reserved. 



Vol. XLVIII 



SPORTSMANSHIP IN TENNIS 

By WILLIAM T. TILDEN, 2d 

World's Champion Tennis Player 



The American amateur athlete is above all else a 
clean sportsman. It is one of his characteristics 
and the underlying principle of our scholastic and 
intercollegiate athletic system. Good sportsman- 
ship is also inherent in American manhood. 

Now this whole question of good and bad sports- 
manship is essential. A nation whose men have 
been trained to the practices of honesty, generos- 
ity, and fair play is bound to have a policy of 
broad-minded liberality in all its international 
dealings. The opposite is likewise true. It has 
been found that following the doctrine of "Might 
is Right" in sport results in giving an entire people 
the same point of view. 

There is just this difference between amateur 
and professional sport: the former insists upon 
honesty, generosity, and fair play among its fol- 
lowers; but although there is a desire to maintain 
an equally high standard in professional athletics, 
it has been found that, when money is a consid- 
eration, fair play is apt to make a hasty exit from 
the scene. For this reason, the games of golf and 
tennis grip their followers in such a manner that 
all are loyal to the sport itself and to all the high 
standards sportsmanship signifies. (Can we say 
the same of organized baseball?) Indeed, it is the 
inherent honesty of these two games that above 
all else grips their players and holds them with a 
steadfastness that the highest-salaried stars of 
the diamond rarely, if ever, feel. 

I am a tennis player. At least, for years I have 
striven to be one. When I was fourteen I was 



fully convinced of this and freely admitted it. As 
the years passed and my career became spotted 
with many defeats, my conviction was shaken, 
but hope grew ever stronger within me. Now I 
know how far I was at that time from being a 
tennis player. One does not always realize, when 
quite young, that there is more to the game than 
winning and losing, than in playing strokes well 
and even brilliantly. That high sense of sports- 
manship inherent to the game — its most out- 
standing feature — is a needed asset in tennis if one 
is either to enjoy it or to go far. 

Tennis always held an appeal for me when I 
was a boy. It seemed to reflect the glamor of ro- 
mance in the spirit of sportsmanship that was ever 
present on the courts and the genial good fellow- 
ship that existed among its players. "Gee!" I 
used to say to myself, "these chaps must be regu- 
lar fellows. I wish I knew them all." 

Time went on, and with the passage of the years 
and the discipline of innumerable defeats and 
ignominious disasters, I gradually attained a skill 
that brought me within that select circle of my 
boyhood dreams — the real tennis players of 
America. I then began to play in various tourna- 
ments here and there and to meet, both on and off 
the courts, the men who had been the heroes of my 
boyhood days: Beals C. Wright, William A. 
Lamed, Holcomb Ward, William J. Clothier, R. 
Norris Williams, 2d, and Maurice E. McLoughlin. 
Although the latter two were more nearly my own 
age and at the top, I had to be content to be the 



675 



676 



SPORTSMANSHIP IN TENNIS 



leading member of the species dub. It seemed 
queer to me, after I knew them as Beals, and Billy, 
and Holcomb, and Dick, and Maury, to recall all 
that these older stars meant to me in my boy- 
hood. As a matter of fact, most of our boyish 




Photograph by Edwiu Levirk 

WILLIAM T. TILDEN, 2D 

ideals as to idols are shattered when one meets 
them face to face, but this was not so with mine, 
for in these men, who represented the leading 
types of tennis experts, I found that same honesty, 
generosity, and fair play that I had always wor- 
shipped as a boy. In short, they were true 
American sportsmen. 

Is it the men who make the game, or the game 



[June 

that makes the men? In my own opinion, it is the 
combination of the two that has placed tennis 
where it is to-day. What a strange contrast it 
offers to most other sports! Take the matter of 
officials. There is no paid umpire to render deci- 
sions. In fact, the men who act as umpires and 
linesmen in the biggest tournaments are there only 
to relieve the contestants themselves from the 
strain of watching the ball. Their purpose is not 
to enforce law and order. And the unwritten 
code of the game is that, in case of doubt on any 
decision, you must give your opponent the benefit 
of that doubt by yielding him the point. This 
quality is so ingrained in tennis players that should 
one enter the field who does not hold to this'gen- 
erous attitude, he must either adopt it very 
quickly or find his position so insecure and un- 
comfortable that he retires from the contest. 

I recall a certain youngster from the eastern 
section of the United States, who, unfortunately, 
was the perfect example of all that was undesir- 
able in this respect. A poor loser, a boastful 
winner, a wild, high-stepping, unreliable compet- 
itor, yet a great player at that. In his first sea- 
son as a tournament player, he gained a prominent 
position not only as a competitor, but as to repu- 
tation as well. The latter was by no means to be 
envied. The following season he began playing 
along the same lines— tactics not to be permitted. 
Thus he quickly found it advisable to retire from 
the sport. Now, after five years have passed, he 
is forgotten, his name never referred to. He has 
gone to the place where all poor sportsmen go— 
the discard. 

Let me, for the moment, turn to more pleasing 
examples to show you to what type of men tennis 
calls, the world over. 

It is a law of the game of tennis that the word 
of a linesman or umpire is final ; it cannot be ques- 
tioned. Their decisions end the matter. Conse- 
quently, there has grown up a fine, clean spirit of 
sportsmanship, an unwritten law, to the effect 
that no matter how flagrant the error may be on 
the part of one of these officials, if it be against 
you, no thought of questioning it may arise. It 's 
a law of the game never to take anything that is 
not due you. This unwritten code transcends the 
written one to such an extent that when one prof- 
its by a mistake on the part of an official he takes 
the law into his own hands and gives justice to his 
opponent. Naturally, this demands a rare cour- 
age, for you are seemingly discourteous to the 
umpire or linesman, as the case may be, yet only 
by so doing can you hold your self-respect. It is 
the recognized method of returning to your op- 
ponent that which is justly his due. 

Let me explain by citing several historic inci- 
dents. Some years ago, in a famous Davis Cup 



I92ll 



SPORTSMANSHIP IN TENNIS 



677 



match in which England was pitted against 
Australasia, those two great sportsmen and won- 
derful exponents of tennis, J. C. Parke, of Eng- 
land, and Norman E. Brookes, of Australia, were 
fighting out a match that would prove the turn- 
ing-point of the 
tie. Parke was at 
his best, an occa- 
sion when he was 
playing superbly. 
1 1 seemed apparent 
to all that he had 
Brookes beaten. 
He was leading 
two sets to one 
and match point 
for the third. Then 
it was that he 
drove Brookes far 
out of court with 
a deep drive, and 
immediately f ol - 
lowed in to the net. 
Brookes lobbed, 
but he lobbed 
short. It meant 
the match for Eng- 
land if Parke won 
the point; quite 
possibly, it meant 
the Davis Cup as 
well. Parke swung 
hard into the ball 
and drove it 
through Brookes's 
court for a kill. 
But his racket, fol- 
lowing through in a long downward flight, touched 
the net so very slightly that none of the officials 
saw it. 

"Game, set, match, Parke!" called the umpire. 

Brookes came forward, smiling, hand extended 
in congratulation. Parke remained where he had 
hit the ball, his face turned to the umpire. 

"Mr. Umpire," he said, "I hit the net." 

"You are sure, Mr. Parke?" came the reply. 

"Quite," he answered. 

Brookes stood silent, still ready with congratu- 
lations. 

"The point is Mr. Brookes's. Deuce!" called 
the umpire. 

Play recommenced. Parke lost that game. 
Brookes, quick to seize his last chance, could not 
be stopped. The match, and ultimately the cov- 
eted Davis Cup, went to Australia. 

Was it wrong for Parke to speak? That ques- 
tion was rather freely discussed at the time. Ten- 
nis men all know it was not, that Parke lived up 




Photo by Edwin Levick 

J. C. PARKE 



to the traditions of the sport, just as all of us hope 
and trust we shall do when such occasions arise. 

Let me further illustrate this spirit of fair play 
by an incident that occurred at the Merion 
Cricket Club in 1914, during the intercollegiate 
championships. 

That was the year when Norman E. Brookes 
and Anthony F. Wilding, notwithstanding their 
winning of the Davis Cup for Australasia, had 
fallen before the miraculous tennis of Maurice 
Evans McLoughlin. "Red Mac" or "The Cali- 
fornia Comet," as he was called, was conceded to 
be the world's premier player when, like a bolt 
from a clear sky, R. Norris Williams, 2d, who but 
two short weeks before had gone down to defeat 




Photograph by Edwin Levick 

NORMAN E. BROOKES 

before both Brookes and Wilding, actually swept 
McLoughlin off the court in the final round for 
the United States singles championship. 

Then came the intercollegiates. Williams, the 
newly crowned national champion, playing for 
Harvard, was an entrant, as was George Myers 



678 



SPORTSMANSHIP IN TENNIS 



Church, of Princeton. These two men were old 
and intimate friends. Fate ordained they should 
meet in the final round of this fixture. The result 
seemed a foregone conclusion. Every one ad- 
mitted that Church had not the vestige of a 
chance. 

Then came the unexpected, to cap the climax 




Photograph by Kdwin Levick 

MAURICE EVANS McLOUGHLIN 

of this weird season of upsets. Church was at the 
top of his form, a master of all his strokes. Wil- 
liams was stale and careless. Thus Church led at 
two sets to one and three games to four on Wil- 
liams's service. Church then went to a 5-3 lead 
in games and stood 30-40 on points when, during 
a close rally, one of Williams's shots touched the 
net and fell good on Church's court. At least, so 
it seemed to all. Mr. A. L. Hoskins, of Philadel- 
phia, was in the umpire's chair and immediately 
ruled the ball good. That made the score deuce 
in points. But Williams immediately spoke up. 

"Mr. Hoskins, my shot went through the net," 
he said, pointing to a hole at that point. 



[June 

The latter turned to Church and asked him 
what he thought. Now, Church had not seen. 
He had been running, and the whole incident was 
doubtful in his mind. But he answered immedi- 
ately, "Williams's shot was quite good. It went 
over the net." 

Thus stood two players, the point in doubt 
quite possibly meaning the championship. It 
certainly meant it to Church, and to Williams it 
meant another chance. Yet both agreed that the 
point belonged to the other, because there was an 
element of doubt in the mind of each regarding it. 
Here was a case of the cleanest kind of sportsman- 
ship that I have ever known. 

To mete justice to both of them after that inci- 
dent was impossible, for both could not win. As 
it turned out, Mr. Hoskins ruled the point a "let," 
and called it to be played over again. Williams 
lost it, and a moment later, George Myers Church 
gained the intercollegiate title and a national 
champion had lost it to him. 

This final round of the intercollegiate champion- 
ship seems destined for unusual displays of both 
sportsmanship and temperament. Not so many 
years ago a University of Pennsylvania player 
was pitted against a famous young collegian from 
California in the finals. A team-mate of the latter 
was one of the linesmen selected for the match. I 
happened to be seated behind him, so I had a 
clear view of the particular line he was judging. 
Like all those splendid fellows from California, he 
was both a fine sportsman and an impartial judge. 
On the other hand, the competitor from his home 
State, while a marvel as a player, was also very 
hot-headed. The personality of his opponent, al- 
so, was certainly upsetting him, for the Pennsyl- 
vanian was one of the craftiest and coolest court 
generals in the country, a man who could worry 
any opponent, a regular sphinx. However, the 
Californian was well in the lead, two sets to one, 
five-two in games and match point at 40-30 when 
he drove down the side line along which I was sit- 
ting. The ball stirred up a cloud of chalk, but fell 
outside the line. 

"Out!" called the linesman, his team-mate. 
The crowd, and also the young Californian, 
having seen the chalk dust, believed the ball had 
struck good. Therefore, the spectators gasped. 
But the player lost his head and promptly ex- 
ploded. The strain of the match had proved too 
great. He foolishly believed he had been robbed, 
and raved around the court. When finally induced 
to play, his whole game collapsed. He threw 
away the set, and the match as well, in a brush of 
childish temper, of which he was only too ashamed 
when he grew cooler. 

That was a case of playing the poor sportsman 
on the part of a man who had hitherto proved 



' SPORTSMANSHIP IN TENNIS 



679 



1921] 

himself to be a good one. Brought on by nerves, 
it cost him the match, the least of his losses. 
There is no doubt that had he accepted the deci- 
sion in a sportsmanlike manner and thus kept his 
temper, he would have won that title with very 
good grace. Moreover, he failed to remember 
that his opponent would not have accepted the 
decision unless he had believed it was correct. 
That is one thing always to be relied upon, for it 
is the spirit of the game. 

Hardly a great match goes by without some in- 
cident that shows the true sportsmanship of 
tennis players. And these incidents are not os- 
tentatiously paraded. Rather, they are treated 
as a matter of course, as though nothing else was 
ever to be considered. 

During the Davis Cup matches last year, 
Brookes deliberately gave me a point by hitting a 
ball out because he knew the linesman had made 
an error against me on the previous point. Such 




know that you are glad. Enjoy the battle. If 
you win, win with modesty. If you lose, lose gra- 
ciously, without the too frequent excuses of the 
poor loser, or the gloomy countenance of the 
grouch. Remember, when beaten, that a better 



Photograph by Edwin Levick 

GEORGE MYERS CHURCH 

a condition he was unwilling to accept. It was 
not tennis, that was all there was to it, in his mind. 

Good sportsmanship on the courts is more than 
merely seeing that justice is done. It is generosity 
and, I might say, hospitality to your opponent. 
By all means be glad to play him and let him 




Photograph by Edwin Levick 

R. NORRIS WILLIAMS, 2D 

player has won. Do not begrudge him his victory, 
but plan to defeat him, in turn, when next you 
meet. It is this spirit of come-back that character- 
izes a great sportsman. It is the full possession 
of it that endears J. C. Parke and Norman E. 
Brookes to the men they face. 

I was fortunate enough to defeat Parke in the 
championships of England last season. His con- 
gratulations were both hearty and sincere, and 
his expressed wish was that he might play me 
again and do better in the Davis Cup. 

I met Brookes first in the U. S. Championships 
in 1919, and defeated him in four sets. Brookes 
enjoyed the match, although the loser. He set 
out to beat me from that moment. We met again 
last year in the finals of the Davis Cup. This time 
he almost turned the trick, but that "almost" 



680 



has not satisfied him. Always he enjoys pitting 
his game against mine. Twice more we met— 
Brookes always working for victory, not with a 
desire to exult, but merely for the joy of outplay- 
ing me, and his appreciation of the high regard in 
which I hold his sportsmanship. He did not suc- 
ceed either time, but I am looking forward with 
keen pleasure to our next meeting, if fate should so 
ordain it occur in the Davis Cup finals again this 
year. My great ambition, should he overcome 
me is to prove as fine a sportsman as he has been 
and to say, as he does, "I'll come back after you " 
_ A true sportsman really gives of his best at all 
times. He recognizes the debt he owes the public 
that honors him by coming to see him play For 
that reason, he must give all he has in his matches 
lo shirk in exhibition matches because there is 
nothing at stake is the policy of the quitter, never 
of the sportsman. 

American boys are the finest type of sportsmen 
I know many of them with ideals that grown-up 
players may well emulate. It is this inherent 
sense of sportsmanship to which tennis appeals 
and which, in turn, is the cause of tennis becoming 
such an important factor in scholastic athletics 
Tennis also takes nerve, and as much as, if not 
more than, any game I know. Let me tell you 
the story of a boy who has gained a high place 
among men by virtue of the nerve he developed 
in tennis. 

In New Jersey, some years ago, a lad who had 
been ill for years made up his mind he would play 
tennis. His trouble was a tubercular hip His 
ambition seemed hopeless. Nevertheless, he set 
out to realize it. First he submitted to a series of 
serious treatments that finally brought the results 
he was hoping for. Then he began for the first 
time to walk without a limp. Soon he started 
playing tennis. As he knew nothing about the 



SPORTSMANSHIP IN TENNIS 



game, he made it a point to attend near-by 
tournaments in which fine players were entered 
in order to study their style and form. Event- 
ually, his progress was rapid and, as a member of 
the team of his city, he went to Philadelphia to 
play. There I met him. Pitted against a young- 
ster more experienced than himself, and one far 
stronger, it was not long before he tired out 
Then came back the old limp. I was fortunate 
enough to be watching this match. I saw the 
stronger boy slowly gain his advantage and begin 
to press .it home, and I recognized the reason for it 
Suddenly a determined expression came over the 
face of the Jersey boy. Slowly he fought back to 
even terms, and finally he forced his way to 
victory. When that was gained he collapsed from 
sheer exhaustion. 

Not only had he won the match, but, with it 
by his magnificent exhibition of nerve and the 
clean sportsmanship he had shown throughout 
the struggle, the respect and admiration of all 
those present. 

Was it all in the boy? I Ve often asked myself 
or does some of the credit belong to the game 
which calls forth such sterling qualities? Person- 
ally, I think tennis has quite a little to do with 
all these incidents that I have set down here. It 
seems to me that there is a tradition of sportsman- 
ship about it that one instinctively feels, once he 
begins playing the game. 

It is my sincere belief 'that tennis is a great 
power for good among the boys of this country, 
for it is not only a game demanding perfect physi- 
cal condition, but a mental keenness, fine nerve- 
control, and, by no means least, the highest spirit 
of sportsmanship. 

For it is always to be remembered that tennis 
and good sportsmanship have been, are, and will 
be synonymous. 




CONGRATULATIONS AGAIN. OLD MAN 




681 




MARY LOU'S MEDAL 



By MARGAR 

"Just the same, Betty deserves the medal!" 

There was a chorus of protest from most of the 
girls sitting on the bench under the old Lancaster 
Oak and on the wide limb that flung itself out 
parallel with the ground. 

"I don't see how you make that out, Miggsy." 

"No," broke in another, "to-day Mary Lou did 
every single stunt a little better." 

"But Betty had been up since five studying for 
that awful history exam, and one of Miss Sadler's 
exams would make any one forget how to walk, 
let alone jump." 

"Well, of course / don't care who gets it, since 
the faculty won't give it to me for my herculean 
labors — " 

There was a laugh at this. Lucile Goodspeed 
was a fair-haired girl who managed to get herself 
into every possible difficulty on the gymnasium 
floor. She explained it by insisting that she had 
a many-sided nature, and that each side wanted 
to do something different. 

"Oh, of course, Lucile, you 're the only possible 
candidate! Just what was your idea in wander- 
ing across the floor this morning, when we were 
marching?" 

"I am afraid you will never understand." 
Lucile threw a pathetic quiver into her voice 
"You see, I came to Lancaster to develop origi- 
nality — personality — individuality — " 

"If she has n't been reading the prospectus!" 
struck in Martha Whitehill. "Skip the rest of it 
and go on!" 

"I said you would n't understand ! Anyhow, I 
came to Lancaster — and what do I find?" She 
struck a tragic pose and nearly knocked little 
Dolly Miller from the oak limb. "Yes — what?" 

"A spider," said Martha, flicking one from 
Lucile's shoulder. 

"I find that I am undone!" 
"You look all right to me," said Martha. 
Lucile paid no attention to these remarks. 
"I have to wear low-heeled shoes, like every one 
else. I have to get up at six-forty-five, like the 
rest of you — or at least, I get up when the break- 
fast bell rings, like the rest of you. I tie my tie as 
I fall downstairs — like the rest of you. I go to 
class and sit on the same kind of chairs and don't 
know my lessons; I race to the dining-room and 
devour enormous quantities of food — just like 
every one else. But I have now solved the prob- 
lerrL I will live up to the prospectus and develop 
my individuality, my — " 

"Skip that part. How will you do it?" 



E. CURTIS 

"Why, in gym. Did n't you hear Miss Nacken 
tell me I was the most original marcher she had 
ever seen? But see here, Miggsy, just why are 
you so anxious for Betty to take the medal? 
Every one thinks Mary Lou will win." 

"I know it. But this is Betty's last year, and 
she 's worked for the Anthony medal ever since 
she was a freshman. She 's been out for basket- 
ball and hockey, faithfully. I know Mary Lou 
has set her heart on it, too, but she has another 
year to try for it. I can't help wishing something 
would happen so that Mary Lou would lose." 

"I had n't thought of it just that way," said 
Martha. "Can't we drop a hint somehow?" 

"Afraid not," said Miggsy. "They have n't 
been very good friends this year." 

"You might try Rosaria Lucia Maria Tonini's 
stunt," suggested Lucile. 

The older girls laughed, but the younger ones 
demanded what Rosaria Etceteras stunt had 
been. 

Lucile told the tale. "Rosaria came from 
Ecuador, and her father was president or some- 
thing. She used to get jealous of her friends and 
want r-r-re-venge on her enemies. Every one 
knew that year that Gertrude Wynn would win 
the medal, and Rosaria got jealous and rearranged 
things in her own sweet way. First, Gertrude 
could n't find her gym shoes. Of course, every one 
had to have a pair, and absolutely the only ones 
she could get belonged to Florence O'Neill." 

"I '11 never forget Gertrude jumping in those 
number elevens," laughed Martha. 

"That was bad enough," Lucile continued; 
"but Rosaria got hold of the underwaist Gertrude 
wore in gym and cut all the buttons down to a 
mere thread!" 

"My word!" gasped Dolly Miller, who was 
English. "What happened?" 

"Nothing, luckily, for Gertrude got to playing 
tag in the dressing-room and pop! off went two 
buttons! She would n't have noticed anything 
even then, but the teacher saw it and made her 
see that they were all on tight. Four of us sewed 
on those buttons, while the audience waited, and 
we sewed Gertrude in to make sure!" 

"There 's the mail-cart," drawled Martha, 
jumping from her perch, "and if I don't get a 
letter from some member of my family to-day, 
I '11 cut them off with a dime." 

"You won't be able to do even that unless your 
allowance comes," called her room-mate, as they 
all followed Martha to the school. 



682 



MARY LOU'S MEDAL 



683 



The old Lancaster Oak was quiet again. 

But it was not deserted. For from the honey- 
suckle arbor, a short distance off, came Mary Lou 
Milford, Betty Garfield's rival for the Anthony 
medal. She slowly climbed into the welcoming 
arms of the big oak which had watched and com- 
forted more than fifty years of Lancaster girls. 



The Lancaster Oak whispered and swayed, and 
Mary Lou watched the shifting green and gold 
lights above her. 

"Betty has been working for the medal four 
years, and you 've only worked for three," the old 
oak seemed to say. 

"But I have as much right as she has," Mary 




" 'I WILL LIVE UP TO THE PROSPECTUS AND DEVELOP MY INDIVIDUALITY' ' 



Mary Lou had n't intended to eavesdrop. She 
had been curled up in the arbor studying her 
Cicero when Lucile's nonsense had attracted her 
attention; and who would n't listen to Lucile? 
Then it had startled her so to hear Miggsy's rea- 
sons for wanting Betty to win that she could n't 
have moved. Dear Miggsy — if ever a girl de- 
served to be president of her class, Margaret 
Burton did. But why did Betty have a better 
right to the medal than she did? It was n't a 
question of it being your last year; it was a 
question of who was the best gymnast ; and as for 
working for it, Betty had n't worked one bit 
harder than she had, she thought resentfully. It 
was just a case of the best man winning. Besides, 
her brother had promised her the dearest little 
wrist-watch in New York if she won the medal. 



Lou thought. "Besides, it was n't right for her 
to room with Marian after she said she 'd room 
with me." 

"So that 's the trouble!" her thoughts made the 
oak say. "You 've kept that vexation warm all 
this time. Seniors are supposed to room with 
seniors, are n't they? Is that why you 're so 
anxious to win?" 

"No, I don't think it is," she answered. "May- 
be that is part of it, but I honestly do want that 
medal more than anything else in the world. 
And something might happen so that I would n't 
have a chance next year. Anyhow, there 's no 
way out. The best one just has to win," then 
she laughed at the thought of Rosaria Lucia's 
plan, "unless — unless I should try to losel" 

"Mary Lou-oo! Letter for you-oo !" 



684 



MARY LOU'S MEDAL 



The girls were returning. By the time they 
had reached the oak her resolve had been made, 
and she felt that it must show in her face. Dolly 
Miller threw Mary Lou her letter and she noticed 
that it was from her mother; but before she had 
time to read it, Miggsy swept her away to a 
class meeting and she dropped the letter into her 
Cicero. 

It was not until she was sitting in her pretty, 
round-necked white dress, waiting for the dinner- 
gong to sound, that she remembered it. The 
letter told of the usual family affairs, the latest 
funny escapade of her little brother. But the 
last page— she felt a lump rise in her throat as 
she read: 

And now, my dear little girl, I rather dread breaking 
some news to you. Your father finds it necessary to 
spend next year in Southern California, and we may go 
there 'for keeps.' We have talked it all over, and we 




"THERE WERE AUDIBLE COMMENTS, NOW FOR MARY LOU, NOW FOR BETTY 



can see no other way, with the family expenses what 
they are and Bruce in college, than for you to leave 
Lancaster. You may decide to stay out a year and go 
back to graduate. There is a bare possibility- 
Mary Lou laid the letter down, almost in tears. 
Leave Lancaster! She could n't. Come back 
and graduate? All the girls that really counted 
would be gone. It was n't fair to ask it ! 

The gong sounded, and gulping down the lump 
in her throat, she went down, trying her best to 
seem as gay as the rest of the chattering, prettily 
dressed girls. 

After dinner she flung a scarf around her and 
slipped out to the old oak. She Watched the girls 



[June 

on the lawn; she heard the jokes and comments 
they called back and forth. Then the seniors 
came out from a class meeting and began to play 
''Senior games"— such as "London Bridge" and 
"Go Up and Down the Valley." Oh, how could 
she leave it all ! No other school would ever be 
like it; no other girls could be like the girls in her 
class. Suddenly a new thought came to torment 
her. 

"If this is my last year, too," she said aloud, 
"there 's no reason why I should n't try my hard- 
est for the medal. I can get that much, at any 
rate." 

. The last ten days of school, with the examina- 
tions, the school picnic, the festivities for the 
seniors, seemed ten years to Mary Lou. Some- 
how it seemed worse to have to leave before 
graduation — to leave without the privileges that 
went with graduation; to have to say good-by 

before your class and 
have them forget 
you; never to have 
the right to wear the 
little Lancaster 
pearl-and-gold pin! 
And Mary Lou's 
usually radiant face 
showed sorrow as a 
pool reflects the 
changes in the sky. 

"What 's the 
matter with Mary 
Louise Milford?" 
Miss Trueblood, the 
head of the scheol, 
asked Miss Nacken. 

"Her room-mate 
says the poor child 
is worrying over not 
coming back next 
year. I, for one, 
will miss her." 

"What's this?" de- 
manded Miss True- 



blood. "Why don't these youngsters sometimes 
come to me with their troubles? I don't suppose 
Mary Lou ever heard of scholarships." 

"Is she a good enough student for that?" Miss 
Nacken asked in some surprise. 

"Well, I '11 admit that Mary Lou is n't our most 
shining scholar. But she has never failed in a 
subject. Besides, she could be one of the leaders 
of the class if she 'd put some of her gymnastic- 
energy into her other work. I should think she 'd 
nave a chance for the Porter scholarship." 

"I wish she could," agreed Miss Nacken. 

"Well, then, you go and drop her a hint that she 
apply for one." Miss Trueblood 's eyes twinkled. 



I92i] 



MARY LOU'S MEDAL 



685 



Hoping against hope, Mary Lou made her 
application for a scholarship. Her father wrote 
that if she was given the scholarship, he could 
arrange to have her stay at Lancaster. If! It 
seemed to Mary Lou that every unprepared recita- 
tion, every school rule broken, rose up before her. 
She remembered how Miss Trueblood had looked 
when the juniors had "borrowed" the ice-cream 
from the sophomore baby-party, and she was sure 
that Miss Trueblood would never rec- 
ommend her. 

At last came the gymnastic exhibi- 
tion, with the Anthony medal contest. 
Every girl was fairly palpitating with 
excitement, for while it was fairly 
certain that either Mary Lou Milford 
or Betty Garfield would take the medal, 
there were two or three others who 
were almost as good. Besides, there 
were second and third prizes to be won. 

In her dressing-room, Mary Lou bent 
low over the lacing of her high white 
shoes, for she feared that Martha, who 
shared the room, would see that some- 
thing was wrong. In the next room 
she could hear Betty saying excitedly, 
"Unfasten the cuff of my middy, quick ; 
I can't get my hand through! Now, 
where is that tie?" It was strange 
that Betty should be so nervous. 
Then the whistle blew, and the girls 
fell in for the march into the big gym- 
nasium, whose galleries and stage were 
packed with spectators. As she en- 
tered the familiar place, Mary Lou lost 
her nervousness. 

She wondered if Betty had. 
They went through the well-known 
marching drill without a mistake; even 
Lucile managed to curb her passion for originality. 
Then came the folk-dancing, then the Swedish 
exercises. She wondered who the judges were, 
and looked up to see old Colonel Hillhouse, her 
father's friend, in the seat of honor next to Miss 
Trueblood. She did n't know who the other 
judge was. Then came the Indian clubs and 
dumb-bell drill, and last came the apparatus work. 

This was the event that every Lancaster girl 
loved. It was like a game of follow-my-leader, as 
the girls swung down the flying rings, jumped, 
vaulted, walked the balance-beams, swung along 
the traveling-boom, turned somersaults over the 
bars, and finished with the swinging jump with 
the ropes. Betty and Mary Lou were leading, 
and one by one the other girls missed in some part 
of the work, or were dropped out for failure to keep 
the proper form. At last, Betty and Mary Lou, 
with two others, were left at the swinging jump. 



Now this was not the most difficult of the feats 
that had been performed, but it showed the finish 
with which the performer worked and was as 
useful as any other in eliminating contestants. 
Grasping the great ropes, up which a short time 
ago they had been climbing, the girls stepped 
back, then ran forward, sliding their hands up 
the ropes and swinging up and over a cord 
stretched in front of them. 





I DID N'T DO ANYTHING,' SAID MARY LOU, DEFIANTLY'' 
(SEE NEXT PAGE) 

Again and again they jumped. Peggy Carter 
failed to make it. Among the girls sitting along 
the sides of the gymnasium, there were audible 
comments, now for Mary Lou, now for Betty. 
Then Mary Lambert missed. 

Suddenly Betty asked, "How high are we 
jumping now?" 
"Five-feet-four." 

Betty, who was short, had rarely been known 
to jump more than five-feet-five. She watched 
while the cord was put up, then seized the ropes, 
ran forward, and, though she made a perfect 
landing on the mat — the cord was down. 

"Jump again, Betty," said Miss Nacken and 
Mary Lou together, but there was the same result. 

Mary Lou wanted to jump with delight. Then 
she too advanced to the ropes, and swung up and 
up — and brought down the cord. 

"What 's the matter, girls?" said Miss Nacken, 



686 



.MARY LOU'S MEDAL 



briskly. "You 've both often jumped higher than 
this. Susy made a mistake; the cord is only 
at five-feet-four now." 

Betty and Mary Lou looked at each other. 
Both were quite white. Then Betty walked 
quietly to the ropes— and missed. Mary Lou did 
the same thing. It seemed to her that every one 
in the gymnasium was watching her, that every 
one was whispering something about her. Sud- 
denly Miss Nacken blew her whistle. Her lips 
tightly set. 

"Fall in!" she called, and in a moment the girls, 
some excitedly talking, some tired and silent 
with the long strain, were in the dressing-rooms. 

Mary Lou dressed slowly and silently, unwilling 
to^ go out and hear the congratulations and com- 
miserations of the others. At last the dressing- 
room was quiet. Then there came a knock at 
the door. Betty came in, in her crisp white dress. 
Neither said anything for a moment or two. 

"Miss Nacken 's vexed," Betty said. 

"Is she?" 

"She says nobody ought to have the medal." 

Another pause. "Mary Lou," said Betty, 
softly, "why did you do it?" 

"I did n't do anything," said Mary Lou, 
defiantly. "Besides, every one knows you can 
jump five-feet-four easily." 

"Did you do it on purpose?" Betty asked. 

"Did you?" asked Mary Lou. 

Then they both began to laugh, and a moment 
later walked out arm in arm, still laughing. 

The next day was commencement, and from 
the breakfast given by the juniors to the seniors, 
all through the morning, Mary Lou had no time 
to think. At last, after Mary Lou, armed with 
her long white staff, had fluttered everywhere, it 
seemed to her, ushering, she dropped into her 
seat with the other juniors. Finally, the program 
began and proceeded to the real business of the 
day — the giving of the diplomas, the awarding of 
the prizes. The Anthony medal was always kept 
until the last. 

Colonel Hillhouse arose. 
_ ''It is my great pleasure," he began with tanta- 
lizing slowness, "to award the Anthony medal, 
which I am assured is the honor most prized by- 
Lancaster girls. Yesterday, most of us watched 
a very close contest. There was an apparent tie 



between Elizabeth Garfield and Mary Louise 
Milford. The judges went into a long session 
finally calling in Miss Trueblood and Miss 
Nacken to assist them. At last they decided, in 
view of Miss Garfield's interest in sports and the 
fact that she is a senior, to award the Anthony 
medal to her." 

There was a roar of applause. Mary Lou, 
clapping with the rest, suddenly found that she 
did n't care, that she was glad Betty had the 
medal. 

But then Miss Trueblood rose to her feet. 
"One moment," she said. "It seems that there 
were peculiar circumstances connected with the 
exhibition. There is reason to believe that one 
girl deliberately set herself to lose for the sake of 
the other." Betty among the seniors sent a 
guilty look at Mary Lou among the juniors. 
"She would probably have succeeded— had it 
not been that the other girl tried the same trick!" 
^ After the laughter had died down, she went on: 
"Now, because Lancaster has always stood for 
unselfishness, for loyalty to friends, as well as for 
sportsmanship, the judges decided to have a 
duplicate medal engraved with the name of Mary 
Louise Milford, who is also the winner of the 
Porter scholarship for the coming year." 

How they clapped! How the exercises closed, 
Mary Lou never quite knew. Somehow they 

were out on the lawn and the girls were singing 

first to Miss Trueblood and then to Betty and 
then to her : 

"God bless her, we love her! 
Oh, here 's to Mary Milford, 
Who 's with us to-day!" 

Betty and Mary Lou stood together, fingering 
the twin medals, when Miss Nacken came toward 
them. 

"But, Miss Nacken," Betty said, "how did they 
know that Mary Lou— that I— that we—" she 
stopped in confusion. 

Miss Nacken smiled. It might almost have 
been called a grin. 

"You girls never will remember that anything 
said in the dressing-rooms is heard all over the 
gym. Your explanations after the exhibition 
added proof to a little suspicion I had, and the 
judges did the rest. And I think their decision 
was fair enough." 



AESOP'S FABLES 

RETOLD IN VERSE BY OLIVER HERFORD 

Copyright, 1921, by Oliver Herford 



THE LION 
AND THE MOUSE 

A little Mouse, who chanced to 
stray 

Near where a sleeping Lion lay, 
Forgetting all that prudence taught, 
Ventured too rashly — and was caught ! 
"O Lion! spare my life, I pray!" 
Pleaded the Mouse; "I will repay 
Your kindness without fail." And so 
The Lion laughed and let him go. 
The Mouse, soon after this mishap, 
Came on the Lion in a trap, 
Bound by strong ropes; without ado 
He set to work and gnawed them 
through. 

"A thousand thanks!" the Lion cried. 
"You 've saved my life, and shamed 

my pride. 
For though it 's true 1 am a King, 
Position is not everything. 
I owe my life to your quick wit!" 
"Pray," said the Mouse, "don't 

mention it!" 

THE FOX 
THAT 
LOST HIS TAIL 

A Fox, once in a trap caught fast, 
Managed, by tugging hard, at last 
To free himself, only to find 
He 'd left his precious tail behind. 
Here was a pretty state of things ! 
Exposed to all the shafts and stings 
Of ridicule and malice, too, 
What in the world was he to do? 
One day he hit upon a plan. 
Calling a meeting of the clan, 
He made a speech and thus began: 






"Dear fellow-Foxes! I regret 

To see that you are wearing yet 

That relic of antiquity — 

The tail. In good society 

It is no longer comme ilfaid; 

Human Beings long ago 

Discarded it. 'T is an offense 

Both against style and common sense. 

Take my advice: don't hesitate; 

Cut off your tails before too late!" 

' M id cries of " Foolish !"" M ad !" " Absurd ! ' ' 

Rose an old Fox. "I beg to state," 

Said he, "we should attach more weight 

To your advanced and lofty views 

Had you yourself a tail to lose!" 



687 



AESOP'S FABLES 




[June 

THE LION 
AND THE FOX 

A Lion that had grown too 
weak 

| With age to leave his den and 
seek 

For food, foreseeing now that 
he 

Must get his meals by strategy, 
Lay down, pretending to be 
sick. 

The beasts, not dreaming 't was 
a trick 

And thinking one so near his 
end 

No harm could possibly intend, 
Flocked to condole— alas ! to 
learn 

The truth too late, as each in 
turn 

Was gobbled up. The Fox, less 
prone 

To trust appearances, alone 
Saw through the trick and 

stayed outside. 
"Come in, I beg!" the Lion 
cried. 

"Thanks," said the Fox, "but 
I prefer 

To stay without. I notice 
Sir, 

That all the footprints here- 
about 

Go toward your den, and none 
come out!" 



THE CROW AND THE 
WATER-JAR 

A thirsty Crow once found a jar 
That held some water, but 't was far 
Too narrow necked, and much too 
low 

The water was for Master Crow, 
With his short neck, to get a drink. 
The Crow then set himself to think. 
At last upon a plan he hit. 
"Since I cannot reach down to it, 
I must invent some way," said he, 
"To make the water rise to me." 
W ith little pebbles, one by one, 
He filled the jar; as this was done 
The water rose and rose, until 
The thirsty Crow could drink his fill. 




AESOP'S FABLES 



689 



THE MICE IN COUNCIL 



Once, in the absence of the Cat, 
The Mice in solemn council sat, 
Some plan of action to discuss 
To curb her practice odious 
Of prying into their affairs 
And pouncing on them unawares. 
After much talk, the plan that met 
With most approval was to get 
A piece of cord and hang thereby 
To Pussy's neck, upon the sly, 
A bell that would not fail to ring, 
When Pussy was about to spring, 
And so announce her fell intention. 
Truly, a wonderful invention! 
The Mice delightedly agreed; 
"Now," said the Chairman, "all we 
need 

Is some one to attach the bell." 
At this an awful silence fell 
Upon the meeting ; no one spoke. 
At length, a voice the stillness broke ; 
"I move, since no one seems to yearn 
To bell the Cat, that we adjourn." 



THE HARE 
AND 
THE TORTOISE 

A Hare one day a Tortoise chaffed 
On her slow gait. The Tortoise 
laughed. 

" 'T is true I 'm slowest of the slow, 
And you 're the fastest thing I know ; 





- Yet 



swift 



notwithstanding your 
pace," 

Said she, "I '11 beat you in a race." 
The Hare consented, half in jest, 
To put the matter to the test, 
And off they started. Like a flash, 
Half round the course in one swift 
dash, 

Bounded the Hare ; then, feeling sure 
That victory was now secure, 
Sat down to rest — and fell asleep. 
Meanwhile, his Rival, creep, creep, 
creep, 

Came slowly on, caught up, and 
passed, 

Creep-creep, creep-creep, until at 
last 

The Hare, awaking, rubbed his eyes 
And saw, to his intense surprise, 
The Tortoise, faithful to her boast, 
Was waiting at the winning-post. 



THE MacDONALD GRIT; OR, THE BORROWERS 




" 'IF I JUST HAD BACKBONE ENOUGH TO REFUSE ONCE!' 



The hands of the big clock in the upper corridor 
were creeping toward the half-hour, and a strange, 
almost uncanny, stillness had settled down over 
Encina Hall. On the stroke of six, the boys had 
scattered in a headlong rush across the campus 
wherever appetite, or pocketbook, directed — to 
the Count's, to Stickey's, or The Inn. 

Dexter MacDonald, in room 230, had not 
joined the noisy exodus, for a reason. He dis- 
covered the reason after he had — with more hope 
than success — turned his pockets inside out, one 
by one; the reason was a lone penny! 

The boy's healthy young appetite had already 
begun to assert itself. What could a fellow do 
to secure a meal when he had n't any money? 
There were not many ways of earning money at 



Stanford, with over two thousand boyjs 
watching every chance in the small uni- 
versity town. All sorts of wild schemes 
daringly presented themselves to his 
notice, but were quickly rejected as im- 
practicable, since the present crisis de- 
manded immediate tangible results. 

The thought suddenly occurred to 
him, "Borrow." And then the silence 
of the big room was broken by a mirth- 
less laugh. Why, that was exactly what 
the other boys had been doing all along 
— "Pepper" Grein and "Swede" Ryder 
and "Tubby" Wells! They had bor- 
rowed from him, with the result that 
he was now "flat broke" and hungry ; 
and his check from home was already 
two days overdue. 

It was n't the plucky little mother's 
fault — of that, Dexter was certain. She 
was n't the kind that forgets. Some- 
thing had happened that prevented her 
sending the check as usual. 

The boy's eyes grew misty as he re- 
called a time, a few months before, 
when it had been a hard pull for his 
mother to send the monthly check. 
The butcher had failed to pay for the 
calves on time, and the expected first 
payment on the prune crop had been 
delayed, she wrote. Dexter never knew 
who advanced the money that month ; 
but it came. And only three days late ! 

He had offered then to return home, 
to give up his engineering course at the 
university, though the cold chills ran 
over him at the mere thought of it; but 
the little mother would have none of it. 
Dexter recalled every word of her reply : 

No, indeed! I don't want you to think of leaving 
StanfordI We '11 manage some way. Call on the 
MacDonald grit. Your father never let it fail him as 
long as he lived; and you must "carry on." You '11 
find it oftentimes requires more courage to face ridicule 
than it would to plunge into real, physical danger. 

But cheer up, Sonny! Better times are coming. 
Just think how much you '11 be making when you 're 
a full-fledged civil engineer. 

Thank goodness, you have enough clothes to last 
through the college yearl 

"Clothes!" the boy muttered half under his 
breath. "Yes, but what good can they do me?" 
And then, as the humor of the situation dawned 
upon him, a grin broke slowly over his set lips. 

"If only Mother and Uncle Henry were here!" 
he said. "They cautioned me so carefully against 



690 



THE MacDONALD GRIT; OR, THE BORROWERS 



691 



borrowing, — and I never have, — but they did n't 
say a word about lending." 

This explanation cleared the situation in his 
mind, but did not make it a comfortable one. 
It was n't that the boys were dishonest. They 
were simply careless; and, having plenty them- 
selves, did not realize how hard pressed Dexter 
was sometimes to get through the month on a 
none-too-large allowance. They always paid 
back what they borrowed, — sometime, — when it 
was most convenient to themselves. 

"If I just had backbone enough to refuse once!" 
Dexter groaned, as he lay on the bed staring 
blankly up at the ceiling. "They 're good old 
scouts, all of 'em, but dog-goned thoughtless, 
I '11 say!" 

Not only was money borrowed, but personal 
belongings as well; and when these "came home" 
at all, they were decidedly the worse for wear. 
But then, look at the honor! Why, his best 
scarf-pin was accorded the supreme privilege of 
hobnobbing with the dignified upper-classmen at 
a senior party! and his new tennis-racket took a 
prominent part in the annual tournament against 
the University of California. His white bow-tie 
and his lone pair of gloves attended the junior 
prom in state; while his "uke" was a regular 
attendant at Encina orchestra practice ; and many 
a night — while Dexter was sleeping soundly — had 
its soft tinkle serenaded some fair co-ed in one of 
the women's sorority houses along the row, 
usually spoken in capitals. Yes, there was no 
doubt of it, Dexter MacDonald's belongings were 
most popular. "If the fellows could only be 
made to see the other side of it," the boy mused. 

Then the solution of the problem burst upon 
him full-fledged, and at first fairly staggered him. 
Oh, it would never do! The boys would cut him 
cold, and their friendship had meant so much in 
this, his first college year ! And then as a realiza- 
tion of his present predicament forced itself upon 
him, he drew his lips down into a firm, straight 
line and knitted his brows determinedly. 

It would take some starch out of his pride, 
perhaps, but the boys must be made to realize 
that a two-bit piece when he actually needed it 
was worth more than a dollar at any other time. 
And if the thing was to be done, he would do it 
thoroughly and make a clean sweep. The boys 
would have to take things seriously some time, 
and the time had come! A desperate disease 
required a desperate cure. 

Now that his decision was made, Dexter's 
fighting spirit, long dormant, was thoroughly 
aroused. He sprang up and, opening a drawer 
in his chiffonier, drew out a bunch of blank cards. 
At first he wrote rapidly upon the cards ; then more 
slowly, stopping occasionally to search the 



chiffonier drawers or the trunk. Then, with a 
nod and a grin, the scribbling proceeded. 

When the job was completed, Dexter was 
appalled at the number of cards he held in his 
hand. "Gosh!" he muttered. "I had no idea it 
was so bad as this." Then snapping a rubber 
band around the pack, he thrust it into his pocket 
and puckered his lips into a hopeful whistle. 

Robert Scott, Dexter's room-mate, flung wide 
the door of room 230. 

"Where did you go, Dex, old scout? I did n't 
see you at the Count's." 

"No — I did n't go there for supper," the other 
hedged. "Did you stop at the post-office?" 

"Yes, and not a blessed thing did either of us 
get! Expecting a letter, Dex?" 

"Well — er — no. Have you seen Pepper and 
Tubby and the rest of the fellows since supper, 
Scotty?" 

"No. Why?" 

"Oh, I just wanted to see the gang to-night. 
Wonder if you could round 'em up?" 

"Sure!" And as Bob Scott traversed the long 
hallway he muttered to himself, "Good old Dex! 
I '11 bet his mother has sent him another box from 
home." And his mouth watered for a taste of the 
big fruit-cake, the salted almonds, and figs that 
experience had taught him would fill the box. 

But his room-mate, left alone with his own 
troubled thoughts, was tantalizing his hunger 
with a vision of that last breakfast at home — the 
flavor of the pink ham, the crisp tenderness of the 
waffles — their holes brimming over with syrupy 
deliciousness. "Yum, yum! I can fairly taste 
'em now!" he sighed, in ecstasy; "only I can't," 
he added, ruefully. 

Room 230 was fairly bulging with the crowd 
that gathered. The mystic words 'a box from 
home' always hold an irresistible appeal to college 
boys, and they now crowded the window-sills, the 
two beds, and the chair arms. But boylike, they 
were growing a bit impatient. Where was the 
box? They could n't catch a glimpse of it any- 
where about the room. Mrs. MacDonald's boxes 
from the ranch had been generously shared with 
all those present; and since the gang was all there 
now, what was Dex waiting for? 

There he stood, looking a bit nervous. There 
was something about the boy's frank, good- 
natured face that had from the first made a quick 
appeal. Perhaps it was the humorous little twist 
of his mouth when he smiled ; or the friendliness 
of the big brown eyes. 

Some one suggestively began to sing "The 
Gang 's All Here," and received a pillow sent with 
an unerring aim. The affair was rapidly resolv- 
ing itself into a full-fledged rush. 



692 



THE MacDONALD GRIT; OR, THE BORROWERS 



"Remember what we did to you fellows in the 
last frosh-soph rush!" panted Tubby Wells, a 
freshman whose avoirdupois greatly hampered his 
movements in close quarters. 

"Yes, but just recall the tubbing and drubbing 
you frosh got at the annual poster fight!" exulted 
his soph opponent, with a superior swagger. 

"Quit your ragging!" warned Swede Ryder, the 
big blond sophomore. "Tubby, if you could 
only see yourself at this minute ! You 'd make an 
abalone giggle. You 're a sort of false alarm, 
anyway, son. Forget it!" 

"Gentlemen!" began Dexter, desperately. 
How he wished he could crawl through a hole and 
pull the hole along after him. How could he 
ever go through with this farce! Oh, if he had 
never thought of it! He had no idea it would be 
so hard. His morale had sunk almost to the 
zero point. 

But a glimpse of his scarf-pin perched jauntily 
in Pepper Grein's flashy new four-in-hand brought 
him up with a snap. He pulled himself together. 
He 'd go through with the thing if it took a leg! 
It was the MacDonald grit that he was calling 
upon now. He was within his rights, and his 
conscience ceased to trouble him. 

"Gentlemen," he repeated, with an air of mock 
seriousness, "whenever the merchant becomes 
overstocked he advertises a 'special,' and you 
fellows all rush in to grab the stuff. I concluded 
that the idea might be used to advantage in my 
own case. I 've accumulated such a lot of things, 
and I can't use 'em, nor wear 'em, nor even keep 
track of 'em. So I 'm going to stage an auction; 
and somebody' 's going to walk off with some rare 
bargains." 

His restless fingers encountered the pack of 
little cards and he drew it out. The boys looked 
at each other wonderingly. No one seemed to 
know quite what to say. What sort of game could 
this be, anyway? 

"I 've listed the things I can get along perfectly 
well without." Dexter snapped the rubber 
band from the cards. "First, there 's my white 
vest. I have n't seen it since the junior prom, so 
it may be a little under the weather. But then," 
he continued, confidently, "it 's perfectly all 
right; only a little matter of a cleaner's bill that 
won't amount to more than six bits. I think the 
vest could be found in Shorty's room, if you want 
to examine it." 

"Ouch!" whistled that individual. And as all 
eyes were focused upon him he reddened de- 
fensively. Well, what was all the fuss about? 
The thing had just slipped his mind, that was all. 

"Then there 's my number fifteen collar of the 
newest cut. I 've only worn it once, but it 's 
mighty comfortable — as Alex probably can testify. 



It 's good as new, and three cents will launder it. 
My tennis-racket is of no use to me. I last saw 
it in the Stanford-California tournament. Possi- 
bly needs restringing or may be a little warped, 
but a good racket, nevertheless," he grinned 
cheerfully. 

Swede Ryder's conscience wriggled uncomfort- 
ably. A hot shame clutched at his throat and 
crimsoned his face. Weeks had passed since the 
tournament, and he had not even put the bor- 
rowed racket into its press, as he knew he should 
have done. 

Dexter hastily sketched through the remainder 
of the cards: the uke, the gloves, a dollar that 
Tubby Wells has borrowed three weeks before, a 
dollar and a half for concert tickets to tide 
Shorty Bishop over a temporary embarrassment 
and to save his pride from breaking a "date," 
and so on to the end. 

The self-appointed auctioneer mounted his 
trunk and proceeded in a crisp, businesslike tone 
— outwardly and ostensibly calm, but with an 
inward sense of dread. The cards were his sole 
"visible assets," so he would auction off the cards. 

"Scotty, I appoint you clerk. Now we '11 
proceed. Gentlemen, what am I bid for a per- 
fectly good collar?" And he held up the card 
on which the item was listed. "Do I hear a bid? 
Thank you kindly. The gentleman on my right 
bids fifteen cents. Do I hear another? Don't 
all speak at once. Fifteen I 'm bid! Who '11 
make it twenty? Last chance — going — going — 
gone at fifteen cents! 

"Now for my opal scarf-pin. You can see it, 
if you wish, in Pepper's tie. Use your lorgnettes, 
gentlemen! You Ml see a handsome stone that 
always brings its wearer good luck. What am I 
bid for this solid gold scarf-pin?" 

The boys seemed paralyzed. Not a word came 
from them. 

"Three dollars. Thank you." Dexter nodded 
to an imaginary bidder. "Three dollars I 'm 
bid, who '11 make it four. Three I 'm bid. Step 
right up, gentlemen, and examine the pin. 
Three I 'in — " 

But the auctioneer was addressing empty space. 
The boys with one accord had fled. 

Dexter's head felt queer, someway, and a lump 
kept catching in his throat. It was this that he 
had feared. The boys had deserted him! They 
had n't taken the thing as he had meant it, and 
he had lost their respect. Then right on the 
heels of this reflection there came a shrewd 
suspicion even more mortifying: — that the boys 
knew he was down to rock bottom and thought he 
was trying to work some sort of graft. 

"Oh, why did I ever think of it!" he groaned, 
miserably. 



694 



THE MacDONALD GRIT; OR, THE BORROWERS 



The big hall outside was noisy with hoarse 
whispers: 

"Gimme four bits, quick! I '11 pay it back to- 
morrow, sure!" 




"THEN WITH A WILD WHOOP, THE AVALANCHE DESCENDED UPON HIM" 



"All right, see that you do! I 'm not Dex 
MacDonald, I '11 have you know." 

"Good old Dex! Have n't we been the limit, 
though? Let 's take up a collection," a freshman 
suggested sympathetically. 

But a soph, in his superior wisdom, laughed 
him to scorn. "Every month or so you have a 



[June 

good idea, son, but don't let it excite you. 'Take 
up a collection!' " he mocked. "Little do you 
know old Dex!" 

"You frosh can't help thinking rot, maybe, but 
you need n't let so much 
of it escape," scoffed an- 
other soph. "The kind 
of 'collection' we '11 take 
up is a 'collection' of 
Dex's own things that 
we 've all borrowed and 
failed to return. Now, 
that includes borrowed 
money, too! Dig it up 
someway, every last one 
of you, and bring the 
stuff here within five 
minutes!" 

Dexter was wearily un- 
tying his shoes. "Might 
as well go to bed," he 
said, huskily. 

Then, with a wild 
whoop, the avalanche 
descended upon him. 
His possessions rained 
down in a heavy shower. 
There was silver, too, 
in a careless heap on 
the table. But Dexter 
saw none of it. He was 
eagerly searching the 
faces of his friends and 
his heart was singing 
with happiness. The fel- 
lows had stood the test! 
He knew, too, that this 
demonstration was only 
the outward symbol of 
an inward reformation; 
and the assurance heart- 
ened him. 

With an unsteady 
laugh, he grabbed 
Shorty's arm. "You old 
alligator!" he said affec- 
tionately, "I don't want 
that white vest. Never 
did like it anyway. You 
keep it!" 

"Not on your tintype! 
It 's sort of mussed, but you '11 find the price of 
laundering it in one of the pockets." A sheepish 
grin overspread Shorty's freckled face. 

Dexter tried not to laugh as he noted the mis- 
cellaneous collection upon the bed — but his lips 
betrayed him. And soon the room was in a 
roar. 



IQ2I] 



THE MacDONALD GRIT; OR, THE BORROWERS 



695 



"Reminds me of 'Roughs' Day' that pile o' 
clothes," a soph grinned, reminiscently. 

"Quite enough there for a 'true-so' for old 
Dex," suggested a frosh brother. 

"Look here, fellows, you know you did n't 
borrow all that money," and Dexter eyed the 
heap of coins suspiciously. 

"On the square, we did! Some of those loans 
are so old they 've grown whiskers. We ought 
to pay interest on 'em!" 

"If some one will form a club, imposing heavy 
fines on borrowers — " placidly suggested Tubby 
Wells, seated in the one rocking-chair. 

"Hear! Hear! Wells!" shouted the others. 

"I don't care! We 've been a bunch o' pikers. 
And I for one — " 

But Dexter was eager to change the subject. 
"Then you fellows did n't — " he began. 

"Of course not! Nothing to get sore about. 
We had it coming to us. And now I propose 
three rousing old cheers — " 



He was interrupted by a quick, sharp rap at the 
door. Dexter glanced at the heap of silver upon 
the table and the thought flashed into his mind, 
"I '11 drop Mother a card not to bother about 
sending my check." 

And then he rubbed his unbelieving eyes. 
She stood before him, her cheeks glowing from 
her long climb up the stairs and the weight of a 
heavy box she was carrying. 

Her glance swept the room. "Why — what 's 
all this?" 

Swede Ryder was spokesman for the crowd. 
"Oh, Dexter was just revealing the contents of 
his — er — 'hope' less chest, Mrs. MacDonald. We 
're just going." 

"Better stay!" she advised. "I 've brought a 
box from the ranch. Of course you 've all had 
your supper, but maybe — " 

"We '11 try pretty hard, Mother," laughed 
Dexter, a little unsteadily. "Come on, fellows; 
don't be bashful." 

A. May Holaday. 



ROSES 

04 Quadruple Acrostic) 

Roses! Close to our back door, red ones grow, four kinds — fouR. 
On nice June days I like to go out there to gather some, and O 
Such big ones! My Sister Bess spends her time with them, I guesS. 
Even when her friend is there, Elbridge Orville Smith St. ClarE. 
Sister sits with him for hours, simply looking at those flowerS. 

James Rowe. 




"IS N'T A JUNE WEDDING JUST LOVELY?" 



THE DRAGON'S SECRET 

By AUGUSTA HUIELL SEAMAN 

Author of "The Sapphire Signet," "The Slipper Point Mystery," etc., etc, 

SYNOPSIS OF PREVIOUS INSTALMENTS 

the box open but they have hidden it in Leslie's bungalow, and in its place they have buried an oldtewel "box of the 

later they saw him fishing on the beach, and his limp had disappeared seemed to limp, but 

Then, the great hurricane arrives, lashing the ocean up almost to their doors Out of the storm whn ^„m 

come to them but Eileen Ramsay, saying she has lost her way while coming in her c^ta^ffijSwffi 
k S °M 6 f her u 1Ck \ randfather - Whil e Poking out at the storm, they suddenly seeTwo dark drc W 

about the old log where the false box is buried, and Eileen unexpectedly calls out, "Oh! TeTbeo^S^ 

Phyllis turns on Eileen and asks if her brother Ted is one of the figures and if he is in daneer rtnriril 

acknowledges that this is the case. They all rush out, with Rags the dog and he a tacks Ted s assailant if I 

only then that they recognize this other person as the man with the former limp He is very intonant nnr 

that the object they were struggling for has been stolen from them by som th rd pe on who Sed SonSm 
~ da ?- , He g0CS m PUrSUit ° f this person ' and the others ret "™ to Leslies bungalow P 

Ho^Ar rW R^rn * g< T explan , a t ion , of the mysteries, chiefly by Eileen. She tells how her grandfather the 

S^fr I f' °. ° CCUPled Curl6W 8 NeSt the past Summer ' has had his lif <= threatened by a great Chinese 
official because he refuses to give up some letters of international importance that he has in his nossessior, tZT 

KS ma? r ay ff k6Pt r by ^ ^ bOX ^ * Sprin "" Anally l5e ^SJ^SffSSt hidden 

by his man Geoffrey Gaines at the now deserted summer bungalow, Curlew's Nest, where he thinks it win be safe 
Geoffrey goes to execute this commission, but, strangely enough, never returns, and they fear something has hao 
hSl °lS ' 1^ , grandfath T er falls m - and E«een. to assist him, offers to try and find ouSrtete 

is really hidden at Curlew's Nest. In this she is discovered and assisted by Ted, who warns her that the two girls 
are trying to fathom her secret. Just when Ted thinks he has found it and is struggling for it, a third unknown 
rushes in snatches it, and gets away. At this moment there is a knock at the door and in walks th mar who haTa 
while be ore been wrestling with Ted in the storm. He discloses his badge of the New York police to^e and he 
says that the person he followed got away on a train to the city with the burlap bag and its contents 



CHAPTER XX 

THE DRAGON GIVES UP HIS SECRET 

The man also started back at the sight of all four 
of them together. And Rags, who had been dry- 
ing himself quietly by the fire, rose with a snarl 
and leaped toward his enemy of the earlier part 
of the evening. 

"Heavens! don't let that animal loose on me 
again!" cried the man, backing off. "I 've just 
been down to the village doctor and had my arm 
cauterized, as it is. I stopped in to tell you 
something you 'd better know. Probably you 
have n't noticed it, if you have n't looked out 
recently. The water is rising rapidly and will 
soon be very nearly up to your bungalow. You 
may want to get out before it sweeps under it!" 

With a cry of alarm, they all leaped toward the 
door, Ted grasping Rags firmly by the collar. It 
was even as the man had said. Peering through 
the darkness, they could see the water spreading 
inward from a recent breaker, only about twenty- 
five feet from the veranda. And the next breaker 
spread in even a few inches further. 



"What shallwe do?" cried Leslie. "Aunt Marcia 
will be frightened to death if she knows it, and 
how I 'm to get her out of here in this howling 
storm, or where I can take her, I can't imagine!" 

But Ted had been critically examining the 
weather. "Don't worry, Leslie!" he soothed her. 
"The wind is shifting. I noticed just now that it 
seemed to be around to the north and is getting 
farther west also. That means the storm is al- 
most over. And the tide ought to turn in ten 
minutes or so. It 's practically at its highest 
now. Ten chances to one it won't rise more than 
a foot or two further. But we '11 keep watch, and 
if it does, we '11 get your aunt out of here in Eileen's 
car, which is just down the road, and take her 
either to our place or to the village. Our bunga- 
low is n't likely to be damaged, as it 's farther up 
the dune than these. Don't worry!" 

Thus encouraged, Leslie turned indoors again, 
and the man, who was still lingering on the porch, 
remarked : 

"If it is n't too much trouble, friends, I 'd like 
to come in for a minute or two and ask you folks 
a few questions about that little fracas this 



696 



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697 



evening and how you came to be mixed up in it. 
It 's all right and perfectly proper!" he hastened 
to add, seeing their startled glances. "I can show 
you my credentials." He opened his coat and 
exhibited a shield on his vest — the 
shield of a detective of the New 
York police force! 

So amazed were they that they 
could scarcely reply, but the man 
took matters in his own hands and 
walked into the house. And 
Leslie never even thought to warn 
him to speak softly because of 
Aunt Marcia! 

Unconsciously they grouped 
themselves about him at the open 
fire. And Rags, now that the 
obnoxious stranger had been ad- 
mitted to the house on a hospita- 
ble footing, made no further 
demonstrations of enmity. 

"My name is Barnes — Detective 
Barnes of the New York force," he 
began, "and I 'd like to clear up 
one or two little puzzles here be- 
fore I go on with this business. 
It 's a rather peculiar one. I 
heard this young gentleman refer 
to a car that was standing in the 
road near here and say it belonged 
to one of you young ladies named 
Eileen. I 'd like to inform Miss 
Eileen that the party who got that 
little article we were all scrapping 
for to-night jumped into her car 
when he got to the road, tore like 
mad in it to the station, left it there, 
and caught the express for New 
York. I was just in time to see 
him disappearing in it, but of 
course / had to walk to the village. 
I suspected what he was going to 
do, though, and I went straight to 
the station and found the car 
standing there. So I took the 
liberty of getting in it, driving 
myself to the village doctor, and 
then back out here. You will find your car, Miss 
Eileen, standing just where you left it, but I 
thought you 'd like to know it had had the little 
adventure!" 

Eileen opened her mouth to reply, but the man 
gave her no chance, turning immediately to Ted. 
"And as for you, young man, I suppose you 
thought you were doing a wonderful stunt when 
you landed into me to-night, just as I 'd unearthed 
the thing I 've been on the trail of for a week ; but 
I '11 have to tell you that you 've spoiled one of 



the prettiest little pieces of detective work I 've 
undertaken for several years, and may have 
helped to precipitate a bit of international trouble, 
besides. I don't know what your motive was, 




"HE OPENED HIS COAT AND EXHIBITED THE SHIELD OF A DETECTIVE" 



—I suppose you thought me a burglar, — but — 
"Just a moment!" cried Eileen, springing for- 
ward. "Tell me, why are you concerned in this? 
My name is Ramsay and I have a right to ask!" 

Detective Barnes was visibly startled. "Are 
you a relative of the Honorable Arthur Ramsay?" 
he demanded; and when she had told him, he 
exclaimed, "Then you must know all about 
Geoffrey Gaines and how he disappeared!" 

"I 've known him since I was a baby," she 
answered; "but how he disappeared is still an 



698 



THE DRAGON'S SECRET 



[June 



awful mystery to us. My grandfather is very ill 

in the Branchville hospital, you know." 

"But did n't he receive my letter?" cried Mr. 

Barnes. "I sent it two days ago!" 

"He has been too ill to read any mail for the 

last two days," replied Eileen, "and, of course, I 

have not opened it." 

"Well, that explains why I have n't heard from 

him!" the man exclaimed, with a sigh of relief. 

"Then I guess you will be interested to hear that 

Gaines is alive and well, but kept a close prisoner 

by some 'heathen Chinees' in a house on a west side 

street in New York." 

"But how — Why— Did it happen the — the 

night he — came down here?" she ventured. 

"I see you 're pretty well informed about the 

matter," he remarked cautiously. "And if these 
others are equally so, I guess it 's safe for me to 
go on and give you a history of the thing." 
Eileen nodded, and he went on: 
"Gaines and I used to know each other in 
England, years before he entered your grand- 
father's service. In fact, we had been school- 
mates together. Then I came over to this coun- 
try and entered the detective service, and he went 
into another walk of life. But we kept in touch 
with each other by writing occasionally. A week 
or so ago I was astonished to receive a letter from 
him, written on all sorts of odds and ends of 
paper and in an envelop plainly manufactured by 
himself. It contained some very singular news. 

"It gave me first the history of those letters and 
how anxious your grandfather was to keep hold of 
them. Then it told how he (Gaines) had taken 
the box down here that night and tried first to 
conceal it in the bungalow. But no place in the 
house seemed safe enough to him. He tried to 
dig up a brick in the fireplace and bury it there, 
but gave it up after he had broken his knife in the 
attempt. Then he had the inspiration to bury it 
in the sand somewhere outside, and he described 
where he did locate it, right by that log. If 
Gaines had known much about the tides here, he 
would n't have thought that a very good scheme. 
He did n't, though, and thought he 'd found an 
excellent place. He then turned to walk back to 
the hotel, but had n't gone more than a mile 
(it was storming hard, if you remember) when a 
terrific blow on the back of the head knocked him 
senseless. He never knew another thing until he 
came to, after what must have been a number of 
days, to find himself a prisoner in a house he 
judged to be somewhere in New York. And from 
his description I 've located it about West Sixty- 
first Street." 

"He appeared to be in the keeping of a China- 
man who dressed American fashion and spoke 
good English. He was told that he was a prisoner 



and that it was hopeless to try to communicate 
with any one until he had reported exactly where 
and how those letters had been concealed. He 
begged for a day or two to consider the matter 
and was granted it, but told that if he did not 
comply with their wishes he would disappear for 
good and no one would ever be the wiser. 

"In the meantime, he managed to get together 
a few scraps of paper, and with the stub of a 
pencil he happened to have about him, he wrote 
this letter to me, describing the location of the 
letters and how he had hidden them in a bronze 
box wrapped in a burlap bag. He urged me to 
go and get them at once, and then, later, he could 
safely describe to his captors where he had hidden 
them. Perhaps you wonder how he expected to 
get this letter to me, since he was so carefully 
guarded. He said that he was on the third floor, 
front, of the house, near a corner where he could 
see a post-box. He happened to have a solitary 
stamp in his pocket, which he put on the letter. 
Then, at some hour when he thought his captors 
were busy elsewhere, he expected to attract the 
attention of some children playing in the street 
and offer to throw them some money if they would 
mail the letter in the near-by box. As I received 
the letter, no doubt his plan worked successfully. 
At any rate, I got it a week ago and started on the 
trail immediately. 

"I landed out here one morning while it was 
still dark, and dug all around the spot mentioned, 
but could n't find a trace of the bag or box." 

"Oh, I saw you that morning!" cried Leslie, 
"But when you walked away you seemed to stoop 
and had a bad limp! I don't understand!" 

"I know you saw me," he smiled, "or, at least, 
that some one did, for as I happened to glance 
back at this house, it was growing just light enough 
for me to realize there was some one watching at 
the window. So I adopted that stoop and limp 
as I walked away, just so you would not be likely 
to recognize me if you saw me again. It is a ruse 
I 've often practised." 

"But it did n't work that time," laughed Leslie, 
"for I recognized you again this afternoon by the 
way you dusted the sand off your hands and threw 
away the stick!" 

"Well, you are certainly a more observing 
person than most people!" he answered gravely. 
"But to go on. Of course, I was very much disap- 
pointed but I remained here, staying at the village 
hotel, and kept as close a watch on the place as 
was possible, pretending all the time that I was 
here on a fishing excursion. I tried very hard to 
keep out of sight of these bungalows, in the day- 
time, anyway. The day you all went off on the 
auto ride the coast seemed clear, and I went 
through the place. But I had n't been out of it 



192l\ 



THE DRAGON'S SECRET 



699 



long and walked down to the beach, when I saw 
the two men drive up in a car and enter the bunga- 
low also, and later come out to dig by that old 
log. Of course, they did n't see me about! I 
took care of that. And I knew, beyond a doubt, 
that they were Gaines's Chinamen, come to find 
the booty. 

"Of course they did n't find it, any more than 
I had, and I felt sure they would go back and 
make it hot for Gaines. I went back to my hotel 
that night to think it all over and make further 
plans, and did n't visit the bungalow again till 
next evening, when I found to my astonishment a 
queer note, type-written, on the table there — a 
warning that the article stolen from its hiding- 
place had better be returned. And under it, a 
reply, printed in lead-pencil, saying it would be 
returned." 

"I could n't make head or tail of the business. 
I judged the type-written part to have been left 
by the Chinese. But who had scribbled the other 
was a dark-brown mystery. At any rate, I con- 
cluded that to-night would probably be the crucial 
time, and determined to get in ahead of every one 
else. The storm was a piece of good fortune to 
me, as it concealed things so well, and about nine 
o'clock I was on the spot, proceeding to dig down 
by the old log. Pretty soon I realized, though, 
that there was some one else around. And just 
as I 'd unearthed the bag, which had been mysteri- 
ously returned to its hiding-place, you appeared 
out of somewhere, young man, fell on me like a 
thousand of brick, and we had a grand old tussle. 
I Ml give you credit for being some wrestler, but I 
was getting the best of it when along came you 
others with that terrible beast and did the busi- 
ness for me! 

"I thought all along, though, that you, Mr. 
Ted, were one of the Chinamen. But that per- 
son must have been on the scene also, probably 
lurking in the shelter of the bungalow and watch- 
ing the fracas. And when your electric light 
blazed on the scene, Miss," he turned to Phyllis, 
"he no doubt saw the bag in my hand. Then, 
when the light went out for a moment, he rushed 
in and grabbed the prize and was off while we two 
were so busy with one another ! 

"It was a losing game all around. While I 
was in the village, I 'phoned my department in 
New York to meet his train when it got in and 
arrest him, if they could find him, and search him 
at once. But after I 'd been to the doctor's (I 
had a long session there) I 'phoned them again 
and heard that the train had been met but no one 
answering such a description as I could give had 
got off. No doubt he left the train at some 
station short of New York 

"Well, the prize is lost for this time, but per- 



haps we can pick up the trail again. At any rate, 
Gaines is probably free, for they promised to 
release him as soon as the letters were obtained." 

When he had ceased speaking, Leslie got up 
from her chair and disappeared into the kitchen. 
When she returned, she laid a dark bundle in the 
lap of Eileen. 

"I guess the prize was found some time ago!" 
she remarked quietly. "Suppose you open that 
bag and see, Eileen!" 

And amid an astounded silence, Eileen's fingers 
managed to unloose the fastening of the bag and 
insert themselves in its depths. Then with a 
little cry of joy, she drew out and held up, for all 
to view, the bronze box that had caused all the 
disturbance — the Dragon's Secret! 

The complicated explanations were all over at 
last, and the curious, fragmentary story was pieced 
together. Detective Barnes took up the little 
bronze box and examined it carefully, experiment- 
ing, as they all had done, to find a way of opening 
it — and, of course, unsuccessfully. 

"There 's one thing that puzzles me, though," 
remarked Ted, "about that queer type-written 
note. How and why and by whom was it left 
originally?" 

"It was written on thin, foreign-looking paper," 
replied the detective, "and I can only guess that 
the foreigners left it there, though probably not 
on their first trip that afternoon. No doubt they 
either went to the village, or, more likely, returned 
to the city to talk it over, perhaps with Gaines. 
And he, supposing I had long since captured the 
prize, and to put them off the scent, suggested 
that some one near by may have been meddling 
with the matter and that they leave a warning 
for them. I feel rather certain he must have 
done this to gain time, for he knew that if I had 
found the thing, I would immediately set about 
having him released, and he must have wondered 
why I had n't done so. Perhaps he thought I 
was having difficulty locating the house where 
they had him hidden. But, Great Scott! — that 
makes me think ! They must by this time have 
discovered the trick you played, Miss Phyllis, and 
be jumping mad over having been so fooled. 
Perhaps they think Gaines is responsible for it, 
and they '11 certainly be making it hot for him! I 
must get to the city immediately and get him out 
of that hole. Ought n't to waste another minute. 
If you can spare your car, Miss Eileen, I 'd like to 
run up to the city with it, as I know there are no 
more trains to-night. I '11 guarantee to fetch it 
and Gaines both back in the morning!" 

"You certainly may have it," replied Eileen, 
"and you may take me with you and leave me at 
the hospital, on the way. Grandfather must 



700 



THE DRAGON'S SECRET 



know of this at once. I 'm positive he '11 recover 
now, since the worry is all over. But first, 
would n't you all like to see something? I hap- 
pen to know the secret of opening this box. 
Grandfather showed it to me when I was a 
little girl, and he used to let me play with it." 

She took a pin from her dress, inserted into the 
carved eye of the dragon and pressed it in a 
certain fashion — and the lid of the bronze box flew 
up! They all pressed forward eagerly and gazed 
in. There lay the packet of foreign letters, safe 
and sound. Eileen lifted them and looked curi- 
ously underneath. Nothing else was in the box 
except some strange, thin bits of yellow, foreign 
paper covered with vague pictures and curious 
Chinese characters. They seemed to be so thin 
and old as to be almost falling to pieces. 

"I don't know what these things are," she 
remarked, "but they probably have nothing to do 
with this affair, anyway. Grandfather was al- 
ways picking up queer old things on his travels. 
But he must have thought them interesting, or he 
never would have kept them in here. But we 
must go now," she ended, closing the box. "And 
I '11 see all you dear people to-morrow. This has 
surely been a wonderful night!" 

But just as she was ready to go, she said, "Do 
show me the dusty shelf where this was hidden, 
please!" and then, as she stood gazing up at it, 
she exclaimed, "To think that it lay here behind 
those worn-out old kitchen things all the time we 
were so madly hunting for it ! But perhaps it was 
the safest place, after all !" 

The two girls escorted Eileen and Mr. Barnes to 
the door, Ted offering to see them to the car. 

As Leslie and Phyllis returned to the room, they 
were startled to see Aunt Marcia, in a dressing- 
gown, peering out of the door of her room and 
blinking sleepily. 

"What on earth are you two girls doing up at 
this unearthly hour?" she inquired. "I woke and 
thought I heard voices and came out to see!" 

"Oh, we 've been talking and watching the 
storm!" laughed Leslie. "It 's all over now, and 
the stars are shining. You 'd better go back to 
bed, Aunt Marcia. The fire 's out and it 's cold." 

And as the good lady turned back into her 
room Leslie whispered to Phyllis, "And she slept 
through all that — and never knew! How can I 
be thankful enough!" 

CHAPTER XXI 

THE BIGGEST SURPRISE OF ALL 

"Phyllis! I 've got a nibble, Phyllis! I believe 
I can land him, too. And it will be the first I 've 
really managed to catch!" Leslie began to play 
her line, her hands trembling with excitement. 



[June 

The two girls and Ted stood at the ocean's edge, 
almost directly in front of the bungalows, whiling 
away a glorious, crisp afternoon in striving to 
induce reluctant fish to bite. For some reason or 
other, they seemed remarkably shy that day. 
Leslie's nibble had been the first suggestion of 
possible luck. Just as she was cautiously begin- 
ning to reel in her line, a pair of hands was clasped 
over her eyes, and a gay voice laughed, "Guess 
who!" 

"Eileen!" cried Leslie, joyfully, forgetting all 
about her nibble. "Oh, but it 's good to see you ! 
We 've missed you so since you left. Where did 
you come from?" 

"Grandfather and I motored down to-day," 
replied Eileen, as they all crowded round her, "to 
stay over night at Aunt Sally's in the village. 
He 's going to drive out here a little later, with 
Geoff rey at the wheel, because he wants to see you 
people. You know, we sail for England on Satur- 
day, and he says he does n't intend to leave before 
he has a chance to greet the friends who did so 
much for him. You 've no idea how much better 
he is! He began to pick up the moment I told 
him the news that night; and in the two weeks 
since, he 's become like another person. But he 
hates it in New York and it does n't agree with 
him, and he just wanted to come down here once 
more before we left." 

"But how did you get here, if he 's coming later 
in the car?" demanded Phyllis. 

"Oh, I walked, of course! It was a glorious day 
for it. Aunt Sally wondered so, to see me taking 
the air in anything but that car! What a dear 
she is! And how scandalously I had to treat her 
when I stayed there before. But the dear lady 
never suspected that I was in an agony of worry 
and suspense all the time, and did n't dare to be 
nice to her for fear I 'd just be tempted to give way 
and tell the whole secret. I used to long to throw 
myself in her lap and boo-hoo on her shoulder! 
I 've made it all up with her since, though! 
There 's Grandfather now! Come up to the 
veranda, all of you, because he 's not strong 
enough yet to walk on the sand." 

They hurried up to the house and got there in 
time for Eileen to make the introductions. They 
were all deeply attracted to the tall, stooping, 
gray-haired, pleasant-mannered gentleman who 
greeted them so cordially — as if they were old 
and valued friends instead of such recent 
acquaintances. 

"I 'm going to ask you to let me sit awhile on 
your front veranda," he said. "I want to get a 
last impression of this lovely spot to carry away 
with me to England. Also, I would like to have 
a chat with you young folks and tell you how 
much I appreciate what you all did for us." 



THE DRAGON'S SECRET 



701 



Rather embarrassed by his suggestion that 
there was anything to thank them for, Leslie led 
him through the house to the veranda facing the 
ocean. Here Aunt Marcia sat, wrapped to the 
eyes, enjoying the late October sunshine, the 



of course, whom it could belong to, and we were 
just wild to get it open and see what was in it. 
When we could n't manage that, we hid it away 
in the safest place we could think of, to wait for 
what would happen. I 'm afraid we did n't make 




" 'THIS LITTLE BOX HAS HAD SOME STRANGE ADVENTURES IN ITS DAY' " 



invigorating salt air, and the indescribable beauty 
of the changeful ocean. Leslie had long since, 
very cautiously and gradually, revealed to her 
the story of their adventure at Curlew's Nest. 
So carefully had she done so that any possible 
alarm Miss Marcia might have experienced was 
swallowed up in wonder at the marvelous way in 
which it had all turned out. 

Leslie now introduced Mr. Ramsay, and they 
all gathered around him as he settled himself to 
enjoy the view. He chatted awhile with Miss 
Marcia, compared notes with her on the effect of 
the climate on her health and his own, then 
turned to the young folks. 

"It is quite useless for me," he began, "to try 
to express my appreciation of all you people have 
done for Eileen and myself in the little matter of 
the bronze box." 

"But we must tell you," interrupted Phyllis, 
eagerly, "that we are n't going to sail under any 
false colors ! We found that little box, — or rather, 
Rags here found it ! — and we did n't have a notion, 



any very desperate hunt for the owner, and when 
we suspected that Eileen might have something 
to do with it, I 'm ashamed to say that we would 
n't give it up to her — at first — because we were 
annoyed at the way she acted. We did n't under- 
stand, of course, but that does n't excuse it!" 

"All that you say may be true," smiled Mr. 
Ramsay, "but that does not alter the fact that 
you delivered it up the moment you discovered 
the rightful owner. And Miss Phyllis's clever 
little ruse of burying the false box probably saved 
Geoffrey a bad time. For if those fellows 
had n't found something there that night, they 
would certainly have made it hot for him. As 
it was, it gained us so much time that Detective 
Barnes had a chance to get my man out of their 
clutches before they had done him any damage, 
though they were furious at being duped. They 
're all safely in jail now, and there is nothing 
more to fear from them. Of course the principal 
who hired them is safe over in China, but he 
did n't gain his point — and that 's the main 



702 



THE DRAGON'S SECRET 



[June 



thing! As for the letters, I concluded that, after 
all, my ideas as to how to keep them safely were 
out of date, and they have long since been for- 
warded to Washington, in the care of Barnes, and 
are now in the hands of my country's representa- 
tive there. I shall not concern myself any further 
about their security!" 

He put his hand in his pocket and drew out the 
little bronze casket. Then he went on, — 

"This little box has had some strange adven- 
tures in its day, but nothing stranger than the 
one it has just passed through. It has, however, 
something else in it, that I thought might be of 
interest to you, and so I have brought it along 
and will explain about it." He opened the box 
in the same way as Eileen had done and revealed 
to their curious gaze the fragile old bits of paper 
they had seen on that eventful night. He took 
them out, fingered them thoughtfully, and handed 
one to each of the four young folks. 

"There is a strange little adventure connected 
with these that perhaps you may be interested to 
hear," he continued. "It happened when I was 
passing through the city of Peking, some years 
ago, during their revolution. There was a good 
deal of lawlessness rife at the time, and bands of 
natives were running about, pillaging and looting 
anything they thought it safe to tamper with. 
One day, in one of the open places of the city, 
I happened along just in time to see ten or a 
dozen lawless natives pulling from its pedestal a 
great bronze idol, hideous as they make 'em, that 
had stood there probably for uncounted centuries. 
When they got it to the ground, they found it to 
be hollow inside, as most of the really ancient 
ones are, and filled with all manner of articles 
representing the sacrifices that had been made to 
it, through the ages, and placed inside it by their 
priests. These articles included everything from 
real jewels of undoubted value to papier-mache 
imitations of food — a device the Chinese often 
use in sacrificing to the idols. 

"Of course, the mob made an immediate grab 
for the jewels, but it had begun to make my blood 
boil to see them making off with so much unlawful 
booty. So, almost without thinking, I snatched 
out my revolver, placed myself in front of the 
pile, and shouted to them that I would shoot the 
first one who laid a finger on the stuff. And in 
the same breath I sent Geoffrey hurrying to find 
some of the city authorities to come and rescue 
what would probably be some thousands of 
dollars' worth of gems. 

"Fortunately, I was armed with an effective 
weapon and they were not. So I managed to 
hold the fort till Geoffrey returned with the 
authorities, and on seeing them, the mob promptly 
melted away. The mandarin wanted to present 



me with some of the jewels, in gratitude for my 
services, but I had no wish for them and only 
asked permission to take with me a few of these 
little scraps of paper, which had been among the 
medley of articles in the idol's interior. Of 
course they assented, deeming me, no doubt, a 
very stupid 'foreign devil' to be so easily satisfied ! 
I have carried them about with me for several 
years, and now I am going to give them to you 
young folks — one to each of you, as a little token 
of my gratitude for your invaluable help!" 

He sat back in his chair, smiling benignly, while 
he watched the bewilderment on all their faces. 
Ted, Phyllis, and Leslie were striving to hide 
this under a polite assumption of intense grati- 
tude, though they were a bit puzzled as to why he 
should choose them, of all people, who had no very 
profound interest in such things, as recipients of 
this special gift. But his own granddaughter was 
under less compulsion to assume what she did not 
feel. 

"This is awfully good of you, Granddaddy!" 
she cried, "but I don't honestly see what the big 
idea is ! I think that story of yours was ripping, 
but I don't exactly know what to do with this 
little bit of paper. It seems so old and frail, too, 
that I 'm almost afraid a breath will blow it to 
pieces. I really think it will be safer in your 
care." 

He was still smiling indulgently. "I suspected 
that the outspoken Eileen would voice the general 
opinion of this gift! I don't mind it in the least, 
and I don't blame you a bit for feeling a trifle 
bewildered about the matter. But I have n't 
told you the whole story yet. To continue. As 
I said before, I carried these bits of paper around 
with me for a number of years, simply because they 
reminded me of my little adventure. Then, one 
day early this past summer, on the steamer com- 
ing across the Pacific, I chanced to meet a man 
connected with the British Museum, whom I soon 
discovered to be one of the principal experts on 
Chinese antiquities. And it occurred to me to 
show him these bits of paper and ask if he could 
imagine what they were. He examined them 
carefully and then came to me in great delight, 
declaring that they certainly were, beyond a 
shadow of doubt, the oldest existing specimens of 
Chinese paper money! 

"And he added, moreover, that the British 
Museum had no specimens in its possession as old 
as these, and declared that he believed the au- 
thorities would be delighted to buy them, prob- 
ably for three or four hundred pounds apiece!" 

The listening four gasped and stared at him 
incredulously, but he went on undisturbed. "I 
said I would think the matter over and decide 
when I reached England. But meantime, for 



THE DRAGON'S SECRET 



703 



reasons which I have already enlarged upon, I 
have decided instead to give them to you, as a 
little testimonial of my deep gratitude. If, by 
any chance, you should decide that you would 
prefer to have the money, I will attempt to negoti- 
ate the sale for you when I reach London and — " 

He got no farther for, with a whoop of joy, Ted 
sprang forward and handed his bit to Mr. Ramsay; 
the others followed his example, striving inade- 
quately to express their wonder and delight. 

But he interrupted them, smilingly. "I should 
like to inquire what form of investment each one 
of you expects to make with the sum you receive? 
Don't think me too inquisitive, please. It 's 
just an old man's curiosity!" 

"I 've decided already!" cried Eileen. "I 'm 
going to spend mine on another trip over here in 
the spring to visit you girls, and I 'm going to 
bring Mother with me. I would n't have got 
here this time if it had n't been for Grandfather, 
for Daddy simply put his foot down and said he 
could n't afford it. And next year Grandfather 
may be in Timbuctoo, and I would n't have a 
chance. But I 've just got to see you all again 
soon, for you 're the best friends I ever made." 

"And I 'm going to save mine for some extra 
expensive courses in chemical engineering in 
college that I never supposed I could afford to 
take," declared Ted. "I expected I 'd have to 
go into business after I graduated, for a year or 
two, till I earned enough, but now I can go on." 

"Of course, I '11 get my music now," cried 
Phyllis, "and I 'm the happiest girl alive!" 



"Now little Ralph will have his chance to be 
strong and well, like other boys," murmured 
Leslie, tears of joy standing in her eyes. 

Then, to ease the tension of the almost too 
happy strain, Mr. Ramsay continued : 

"But there is another member of this party 
that it would not do to forget!" He drew from 
his pocket a handsome leather-and-silver dog- 
collar, called Rags over to him, and, as the dog 
ambled up, gravely addressed him: 

"Kindly accept this token of my immense 
gratitude and allow me to clasp it about your 
neck!" Rags submitted gravely while his old 
collar was removed and the new one put in place, 
and then began to make frantic efforts to get it 
off over his head ! Mr. Ramsay only laughed and 
held up a bank-note, adding: 

"I realize that you do not entirely appreciate 
this gift at present. In fact, I sympathize with 
you in thinking it a decided nuisance! But here 
is something else that may soothe your sorrow— 
a five-dollar bill, to be devoted exclusively to the 
purchase of luscious steaks, tender chops, and 
juicy bones for your solitary delectation!" 

Amid the general laughter that followed, he 
added: "And now, may I ask that you escort me 
over to the veranda of Curlew's Nest? I have a 
great desire to walk up and down on that porch 
for a few moments and think of all the strange 
adventures of that delightful little bungalow!" 

And, accompanied by Rags, still striving madly 
to scrape off his new collar by rubbing it in the 
sand, they escorted their guest to Curlew's Nest! 

END 



THE MERRY RAIN 

By JOSIE EPPERT 

To-day the merry rain came down 

Aslant the misty air; 
With long, cool fingers washed my face 

And wet my braided hair. 

I watched it fill the ditches up 

And spatter in the pool, 
As slowly through the silvery shower 

I homeward trudged from school. 

It sang a busy, humming song 
To greet the fragment grass, 

And tinkled tiny raindrop tunes 
To please a little lass. 




OH WHO WILL GO A-GIPSYING? THE MORNING 'S WIDE AND BLUE" 

704 




i n 




WHO WILL GO A-GIPSYING? 

A Girl-Scout Canzonet 

By EDITH D. OSBORNE 

Oh, who will go a-gipsying, a-gipsying with me? 
Where happy roads are luring and valleys fair to see, 
Green hills and white roads that lead to Arcady; 
Who will go a-gipsying, a-gipsying with me? 

A comrade! a comrade! one who will think as I; 
One who loves the greenwood, the hills that tower high; 
A maid who loves the lacing boughs under a starry sky; 
A comrade! a comrade! one who will think as I. 

Oh, who will go a-gipsying? the morning 's wide and blue; 

It calls me; the white roads are calling, calling too. 

There 's a lure in the west wind, it thrills me through and through; 

I listen to its calling, O morning wide and blue! 

(Green hills and white roads that lead to Arcady) 

Who will go a-gipsying, a-gipsying with me? 



A SUMMER GOWN 



The meadow is a gown of green. 

Sing ho, for grasses short and tall ! 
The meadow is a gown of green — 
A gown of sunny, silken sheen, 
And rich as that of an)- queen. 

Sing ho, the gown of green, 0! 
The little brook 's a ribbon gay. 

Sing ho, the winding, twisting stream! 
The little brook 's a ribbon gay, 
The girdle of the gown, I say, 
Around, about it loops away — 

Sing ho, the gown of green, O! 



The daisies are the buttons round. 

Sing ho, for yellow ones and white! 
The daisies are the buttons round, 
And never in straight rows they 're found, 
But, hit or miss, they dot the ground. 

Sing ho, the gown of green, 0! 
Queen Anne's lace is the trimming white. 

Sing ho, for fluffy, soft rosettes! 
Queen Anne's lace is the trimming white. 
It makes the gown a lovely sight, 
Because it adds a touch so light. 

Sing ho, the gown of green, O ! 

Blanche Elizabeth Wade. 



70S 



BOY HUNTERS IN DEMERARA 



By GEORGE INNESS HARTLEY 



CHAPTER XVII 

THAT GIANT ARMADILLO 

A second week slipped by. The entire party was 
discouraged over the scarcity of armadillos. The 
jungle was quartered from morning till sundown. 
It seemed as if. the expedition was doomed to 
failure. Except for the single glimpse of one, 
which was accredited to Jack and Walee, and a 
lew old tracks seen by the Indians, the giant 
armadillo appeared to be as extinct as its former 
associate, the giant sloth. 

Paul, Fred, and Wa'na formed a close cor- 
poration — at least the boys did, making Wa'na 
their chief aide — which they called the "Giant- 
Armadillo-or-Bust Corporation," and set out 
"scientifically" to find the secretive "yesi." 
In spite of the pertinacious name of their organ- 
ization and their unremitting efforts to justify its 
title, they were willing at the end of the second 
week to give up in despair. The time seemed 
approaching when the corporation would pass 
into the hands of a receiver. 

At length came a day when, in the throes of 
desperation, they took a solemn vow not to re- 
turn without the object of their quest. Jack 
smiled at their fierce earnestness and savage 
gestures and bade them be gone with the Indian. 

As every yard of the jungle for several miles 
around had been searched, they decided to walk 
ten miles straight away from camp before deploy- 
ing for the hunt. Their progress was slow, owing 
to the hilly contour of the land, but several hours 
later they entered a country entirely new. 

From the low mountain ridge which they 
could see ten miles to the northward, the foothills 
jutted like promontories into the sea — the sea 
in this case being the jungle. The party walked 
through a maze of ridges and gullies which, with- 
out their compasses and the sun, would soon have 
caused them to lose all sense of direction. Even 
Wa'na was troubled by the bewildering labyrinth 
of ravines and marked their trail with special 
care. 

Slightly fatigued by the continual mounting 
and descending, they rested on a large rock. The 
forest was as heavy as ever. So far as the hunters 
could see, it was in no way different from that on 
the lower Mazaruni. They leaned back and 
utterly relaxed. 

About fifty feet away lay another stone slab, 
surrounded by sparse undergrowth. The Indian 
had rested his eyes on this for some moments, 



when the boys felt him start and whisper: 
"Watch rock. Somet'ing happen soon!" 

They stared at the smooth slab, but it remained 
as it had been a moment before. Both heard a 
peculiar cry from the bushes in its vicinity, there 
came a flutter of wings, and a bird about the size 
of a small bantam hen appeared on the stone. 
Its entire body, except for the tip of its tail and 
the black wing primaries, was clothed in ruddy 
orange, so brilliant that it glowed like fire, and 
its head held a crest of the same color, which 
curved forward, almost covering the short bill. 

It was not the gorgeous body which fascinated 
the watchers, so much as the antics through 
which the bird went. It uttered a strange, gut- 
tural note, bobbed its tail, and commenced to 
dance. Up and down flicked the tail-feathers, 
and out stretched its wings. It scratched at the 
bare rock and jumped straight into the air, to the 
accompaniment of the voices of a dozen others 
which had collected to watch the performance. 
Again and again it repeated its scratching and 
leaping, its jerking and bobbing, then, tiring, it 
hopped to the bushes, while a second took its 
place. 

"What are they?" whispered Paul. 

"Cock of the rock," replied his chum. "Watch 
'em. Only the males are dancing." 

True enough, the three or four females, lighter 
and of less brilliant hue than their suitors, took 
no part in the dance, but were satisfied to add 
their cries of encouragement. Unfortunately, at 
this moment Fred sneezed; the birds took fright, 
and disappeared among the tree-tops as fast as 
they could wing their way upward. 

Luck seemed with the hunters that day, for 
half an hour later Wa'na paused beside a brook 
which flowed into a palm-grown swamp, and, 
eagerly pointing toward the ground, exclaimed: 

"Mowoorima tracks dar!" 

Dashing forward, the boys bent to examine the 
spoor. A single indentation showed, engraved 
deeply in the mud. It was as large as one of 
their outspread hands and evidently fresh, the 
water not yet having finished seeping into it. 
There could be no doubt of its identity ; no crea- 
ture could boast of such a foot but the giant 
armadillo! 

Greatly excited by this find so early in the day, 
the small party separated to hunt. They sought 
the burrow, not the beast itself, for once having 
found this, they could be certain the armadillo 
would not be far off. Indeed, the chances were 



706 



BOY HUNTERS IN DEM ERA RA 



707 



that the creature would be at home, for its feed- 
ing habits are more than half nocturnal. 

To Paul fell the honor of finding the tunnel, 
but in a strange manner. He had come to a more 
level stretch of forest, where there were fewer 
projecting rocks and the soil was of a clay-like 
texture. He tramped along, eying the ground 
carefully, examining the scars caused by up- 
rooted trees, and poking into bushy hollows. 
Presently he was aware of the shadowy, gray 
form of a foxlike thing, which trotted parallel to 
him about a hundred feet distant. Without 
pausing to think, he fired. 

The animal, a forest jackal, gave a startled 
yelp, and, with its tail almost dragging on the 
ground, turned and scuttled off. The boy uttered 
an exclamation of chagrin at having missed and 
stared after the departing creature. To his 
surprise, it seemed to disappear into the side of a 
low bank a few yards farther on. 

His mind leaped at the thought: could this be 
the hole he was seeking? He rushed to the spot, 
and sure enough, there was the mouth of a small 
tunnel leading into the hillside! His heart sank; 
if the crab-dog had gone in, the armadillo certainly 
could not be there. 

Several seconds later he was disabused of that 
idea, however, for a howl resounded from the 
depths of the earth, and as he leaned over the 
hole, something that whined with fear tore by, 
flinging the dirt in his face as it passed on its mad 
flight. That poor forest jackal was certainly 
having some terrifying experiences that day! 

Much cheered by this performance, and not a 
little startled, Paul fired in quick succession 
three shots into the air, which was the signal 
agreed upon if the burrow was discovered. Wa'na 
appeared as the sound of the last shot died away, 
and five minutes later Fred joined them. 

"Here it is!" shouted the discoverer, dancing 
a few steps of a shuffle as he caught sight of the 
Indian. "Right here in the bank!" 

Wa'na examined the opening and grunted, 
then, pointing to some trampled earth which 
Paul had overlooked, said: 

"Dar tracks all right. Crab-dog, too." 

Paul related his experience and the Indian 
smiled. 

"Armadillo, he dar in hole. Crab-dog, he 
much coward and run away." 

When Fred arrived they investigated the 
immediate neighborhood and discovered a second 
opening fifty feet distant. It was as large as the 
first and had been recently used. Evidently 
these were the only entrances, for a careful search 
revealed no others. 

Satisfied that this was the case, the hunters 
held a council of war. W'a'na argued that they 



should return to camp for suitable implements, 
such as shovels and traps for capturing the beast, 
but both boys urged otherwise. 

"By the time we get back to the creek it '11 
be afternoon," Fred exclaimed, "and then 
Jack '11 wait until to-morrow! In the meantime, 
the old armadillo '11 change its den or be gone 
when we get back here. No; there 's no use 
taking chances. I vote we get after him now." 

In this he was backed up by his chum. 

"Think of the victory we '11 gain over Jack if 
we get one before he does!" was his argument. 

Between them, they finally warmed the In- 
dian to their way of thinking. W a'na, now that 
he had given in, became as eager as the others. 
Plans were quickly formulated. A fire was to 
be built over the lower hole to permit the smoke, 
caught by an upward draught through the tunnel, 
to enter the den and drive the armadillo from the 
upper entrance. This was agreed to be the most 
sensible, as it was the most rapid, method of get- 
ting at the creature. 

The Indian had never seen a giant armadillo, 
or perhaps he would have suggested amendments 
to the original plan. He had heard them de- 
scribed, and recognized their tracks from a simi- 
larity to those of lesser armadillos, but the beast 
itself was as new to him as it was to his com- 
panions. 

In a few minutes a fire blazed before the lower 
entrance; but to their chagrin, the smoke failed 
to enter the burrow as they had expected. From 
Paul came the suggestion that they build an 
awning over the mouth of the tunnel with green 
palm-leaves, and, having smudged the fire down 
with damp moss, place it under this shelter. They 
followed his idea, and presently were delighted 
to see the fumes drift inward. 

All was excitement. W'a'na stayed near the 
fire, fanning and blowing, while the boys went to 
the other hole. They laid their guns beside them 
and knelt in front of the entrance in order to 
seize the armadillo when it rushed forth. It was 
their intention to take the creature alive, if 
possible, so as not to mar its body by a charge of 
shot. 

"It ought to be a cinch!" declared Fred, au- 
thoritatively. "I 've caught lots of the smaller 
ones with my hands. As soon as they feel you 
grabbing for their tails, they curl up like a possum 
and play dead. You stand in front, Fat, to 
head him off, and I '11 grab as he goes by. If he 
gets away, he can't run very fast, and then we '11 
shoot him." 

Five minutes later they saw thin frills of 
smoke floating from the tunnel. 

"Get ready!" shouted Fred. "He '11 be out 
in a minute!" 



708 



BOY HUNTERS IN DEMKRARA 



[JUNE 



At that instant the armadillo did come out! 

It came with a rush, and the unfortunate Paul 
was bowled over as if struck by an express-train. 
Fred made an ineffectual grasp at the tail and 
sprawled full upon the back of the antediluvian 
beast. He was dragged along for twenty feet 
and finally was scraped off by a thicket of thorny 
bushes, aided by a low running vine which caught 
under his throat. Before either hunter could 
regain his scattered senses the creature had dis- 
appeared. 

"I thought he ran like a turtle and played 
possum when you touched him!" moaned Paul, 
reproachfully, rolling to a sitting position and 
gingerly rubbing his bruises. 

"He did n't act like most armadillos!" Fred 
lamented from his thicket. "Ouch! He almost 
wrecked me!" 

He painfully extracted himself and advanced 
toward his friend. His shirt was torn in a dozen 
places, his breeches had a huge rent down one 
leg, and his freckled face bore a three-inch scratch 
where a thorn had grazed it. Altogether he was a 
very woebegone and dilapidated bit of humanity. 

The disgruntled hunters turned toward camp 
with bitterness in their hearts. All chance of 
again seeing the armadillo was gone; it would 
never return to the den where it had received 
such rough treatment. Perhaps it would he 
weeks before they had another such chance. 
The C7iant-Armadillo-or-Bust Corporation had 
suffered another serious setback. What rotten 
luck! 

CHAPTER XVI 1 1 

A FIGHT WITH A WOUNDED JAGUAR 

Gradually the forest grew dark. A storm was 
brewing. The hunters, redoubling their speed, 
pressed forward, but within ten minutes found it 
necessary to crouch beneath projecting roots and 
fallen logs to escape the deluge. 
The storm struck. 

First fell a few enormous drops, then the tree- 
tops swung forward through an arc of many 
degrees, and were held in that position for a full 
minute by the rush of the elements. The air 
became full of flying leaves; entire branches were 
torn off and crashed downward; trunks swayed 
and creaked; roots groaned painfully and tugged 
against the ground which held them. The down- 
pour came and changed the forest into a horde 
of twisting, struggling, unshapely monsters. It 
became impossible to see beyond a few yards. 

The tree behind which Paul crouched gave a 
sudden lurch. He felt the earth quiver and saw 
a large root part at the surface of the ground. 
Leaping aside, he was barely in time to escape 



being crushed by its trunk as it lunged over. 
Wa'na and Fred had hidden some distance away 
to the windward and were safe. 

After the first prolonged gust the wind passed 
on. The trees straightened and the jungle was 
shaken only by the roar of the deluge. This died 
down in time to a gentle drizzle, then ceased 
altogether; but the leaves continued dripping 
for many minutes. 

More despondent than ever, the company 
continued its journey toward camp. Even the 
elements had turned against them. And as they 
soon found out, there was worse to come. 

Wa'na was advancing over the vague trail of 
broken twigs which they had left that morning, 
when the boys saw him suddenly raise his gun 
and fire. At the same instant, both caught sight 
of a large spotted cat, a jaguar, trotting off through 
the undergrowth. As the Indian fired, the cat 
gave a snarl and sprang behind the base of a tree. 

Immediately all three spread out, Wa'na in one 
direction and the two boys in another, to sur- 
round the tree. They advanced with extreme 
caution, watching for the slightest movement of 
bushes and with their guns ready for instant use. 
The tree was reached, but the jaguar was gone. 

The Indian explored the ground closely and at 
length discovered a drop of blood. A second lay 
a few feet distant, showing the beast had gone 
in that direction. 

Following this trail was an easy matter, and 
a hundred yards farther on they halted before a 
dense tangle of dead brush and vines. 

"Tiger, me t'ink he in dar," whispered Wa'na. 
"You stay here. Me go see." 

He had hardly covered twenty feet when he 
stopped with a yell and fired both barrels of his 
gun. Uttering another shout for them to look 
out, he leaped to one side as a great body launched 
itself from the bushes. As quick as thought, the 
boys fired, then jumped for safety. 

The cat fell exactly upon the spot where the 
Indian had been, but that wary individual, after 
his lightning leap, had crawled away on all fours. 
The wounded jaguar swayed unsteadily for a few 
seconds, then, catching sight of the creeping 
figure but half a dozen feet away, started toward 
it, snarling. The Indian increased his speed and 
made an attempt to regain his feet, but tripped 
and went down again. 

The immense jaguar was almost upon him, 
when both Fred and Paul rushed forward and 
poured their remaining barrels into the beast. 
There came a throaty sigh, and the cat slumped 
over on its side with a ragged gap in its head and 
a large hole behind its shoulder. 

"Wow, we 've got a jaguar anyway!" Fred 
shouted, when they had made sure the beast was 



I92IJ 



BOY HUNTERS IN DEMERARA 



709 





dead. "This has n't been such a bad day, after 
all ! W ho wants an old armadillo if he can get a 
cat like that, I 'd like to know?" 

"That 's what I say," chimed in his gleeful 
chum. "No use bothering about such things as 
giant armadillos when there are jaguars around. 
Whew! I 'm shaking yet!" 

"How about it, Wa'na? It looks pretty good, 
does n't it?" Fred had placed one foot on the 
body and struck a pose. "Wish we had a cam- 
era." 

The Indian said nothing, but remained on the 
ground where he had been all the time and 
rubbed his left ankle. 

"What 's the matter, Wa'na?" Paul asked, 
suddenly noticing the action. The Indian 
shrugged his shoulders and replied: 

"Me hurt ankle. No can walk. Wa'na 
Tanks marsters for saving life. W a'na, he stay 
here by tiger and marsters go back to camp to 
get help." 

"Not if we know it, we won't!" both boys 
shouted together. "What 's the matter with the 
ankle, anyway?" 

An examination showed that it was either 
badly sprained or broken; owing to their inex- 
perience they were unable to determine which. 
But whatever the injury was, the Indian could 



not walk. It was out of the question for him to 
use a crutch that afternoon — it would have been 
dark before he could have hobbled a mile through 
that uneven country. There was nothing to do 
but wait for the morrow. 

Somewhat dashed in spirits, they prepared a 
camp. A quantity of palm-leaves had been 
collected and a shelter partially constructed when 
Fred suddenly paused in his work to say: 

"I 'd forgotten all about Jack. He '11 be 
worried to death if we don't turn up to-night. 
Why don't you trot on back to camp, Fat, to 
let 'em know what the trouble is? I '11 stay here 
with Wa'na." 

"Nothing doing! I '11 stay and you go. Jack 
ought to be warned, all right." 

Immediately followed a discussion in which 
phrases like "You go," "I 'd like to stay," "Oh, 
the trail '11 be easy enough to follow," "It 's not 
like that at all," predominated. The Indian 
listened with a smile on his face. Finally he 
suggested, "You draw long stick for it." 

"That 'sa good idea!" declared Fred. "W r e '11 
match for it! How about it, Fat?" He drew 
a coin from his pocket and tossed it in the air. 
"Heads you go, tails I go." 

Heads came uppermost and Paul prepared to 
depart . 



710 



ROY HUNTERS IN DEM ERA RA 



[June 



"I '11 be back the first thing in the morning," 
he said. "We '11 bring a hammock and carry 
Wa'na back." 

"Be careful to follow those broken twigs," 
his friend shouted after him, "and be sure to 
bring plenty of men to carry that hammock." 

But by noon the next day neither Paul nor 
the hammock had appeared ! 

CHAPTER XIX 
lost! 

Toward sundown the elder Milton began to 
grow uneasy. Wa'na and the boys should have 
returned an hour before. Now there were only 
a few minutes left of daylight; and if they did 
not arrive by the fall of darkness, he knew he 
would not see them that night. 

Darkness arrived and no hunters returned. 

Jack consoled himself with the thought that 
Wa'na was with them, and, with the determina- 
tion not to worry, made ready for the night. He 
had not taken seriously their declaration not to 
return without an armadillo, but they might 
have been more in earnest than he thought. 

It had been a disappointing day for him, too. 
No further sign of the armadillo he had glimpsed 
had been forthcoming. Nearly two weeks had 
passed since their arrival, and the fulfilment of 
their quest was as far off as ever. And now the 
boys were gone. He could not deny that he was 
troubled about them, though perhaps they had 
only misjudged the distance back to camp and 
had been overtaken by darkness. Mid-morning 
would probably find them back. 

But on the following day, noon came without 
their return. Jack was badly worried ; something 
serious had occurred, of that he was sure. 

When he had made up his mind that this was 
the case he dispatched the two remaining Indians 
to search, and himself set out alone, leaving the 
Bovianders in charge of the camp. It was nearly 
three o'clock when he struck the train of broken 
twigs and met Walee on the same errand. They 
hurried on together, for to the Indian that trail 
was simple reading. 

An hour later they came upon Fred and Wa'na, 
the latter hobbling on a rude crutch manufactured 
from the fork of a sapling. Over the shoulder 
of the boy was slung the hide of the jaguar. 

"Well, you 're fine ones!" shouted the small 
chap, reproachfully, when he caught sight of his 
brother. "Where 's that hammock? Here you 
've made Wa'na walk pretty near five miles on 
his crippled foot !" 

"What are you talking about, Fred? What 
hammock do you mean? What 's the matter 
with Wa'na?" 



"He 's in pretty bad shape, thanks to you!" 

"Here, here; let 's get to the bottom of this. 
What happened? Wnere 's Paul?" 

"Did n't he get back to camp?" Fred de- 
manded, slightly taken aback by this question. 
"Did n't he tell you to bring a hammock? Where 
is he?" 

"I 'm sure I don't know," replied his brother. 
"We have n't seen him since you left yesterday 
morning. Now tell me what happened." 

But Fred ignored this request and exclaimed: 

"Then he 's lost! He left us yesterday after- 
noon to tell you where we were. Are you sure 
you have n't seen him, Jack?" 

His voice was pleading, and he looked badly 
frightened. Upon receiving a negative answer, 
he shouted desperately: 

"Come on ! I 'm goin' to hunt for him ! Come 
on; we 've got to hurry!" 

He flung the jaguar skin into the bushes and 
started off. Jack sprang after him and grasped 
his arm, shaking him vigorously to bring him to 
his senses. 

"Steady, old chap," he said quietly to the 
excited boy; "let 's talk this over first and not 
start off on a wild-goose chase. We '11 find Fat, 
don't worry about that. Now let 's have it all." 

When Paul left the others building a camp, he 
retraced his way to the spot where they had first 
seen the jaguar. He easily picked up their broken 
trail where it had been left, and followed the 
line of bent twigs for a mile. Here the path be- 
came extremely winding, owing to the rugged 
nature of the country, and he had much trouble 
to keep to its twists and turns. Here, too, the 
marking became vague; the Indian had blazed 
only the angles, just sufficient for his own sharp 
eyes to recognize the way. 

Hastening along as rapidly as he could in 
order to reach camp before nightfall, the boy 
suddenly discovered that he had missed one of 
the turns. For the past hundred yards not a 
single misplaced twig had caught his eye. Un- 
troubled by this he faced about and returned 
over the route he imagined he had come; it was 
only a slight mistake. 

But two hundred yards in that direction failed 
to bring him back to the path. Evidently he 
had recrossed it. Turning once more, he re- 
traced his steps, only to become convinced a few 
minutes later that the trail was lost. Still 
undaunted, he searched his pockets for his com- 
pass. If he could not use the path back to camp, 
he could at least strike the creek higher up and 
follow it down. 

Something like an electric shock thrilled through 
his body. Where was that compass? It had 



1921] 



BOY HUNTERS IN DEM ERA RA 



711 



been in his pocket when they started. Perhaps 
it was in the other one. A search proved it was 
not there. He might have made a mistake. 
Again he hunted through his clothing, turning 
the pockets inside out, but the compass was gone! 

The sun! Perhaps he could use that. But 
when he looked skyward he discovered the orb 
was blotted out by a dense bank of clouds. 

Paul was frightened now. The trail was his 
last remaining hope. He raced back frantically, 
and then around in a big circle, but the broken 
bushes still eluded him. Determined not to 
give way to panic, he seated himself on a log. 
The sun might come out from behind those clouds. 

Ten minutes later he was on his feet again, 
glancing wildly about — he felt sure he had been 
seated an hour, and the cloud-bank was heavier 
than ever. It had spread over the whole sky. 

At last the boy gave way to the panic which 
he had dreaded. He must hnd the trail, and 
find it quickly! Away he dashed, running this 
time, scarcely noting where he went. A quarter 
of a mile farther on he turned abruptly to the 
left, thinking in a confused way that the new 
direction might lead him to it. If he had only 
known it, he had been running in a circle, and the 
new turn had set him on the path directly away 
from the trail. But at that time he was too 
bewildered to think clearly about anything. 

A half-hour of running left him K ing exhausted 
on a rock where he had fallen. He was in a kind 
of coma of despair. As his breath returned, 
however, so was his reason restored. He stared 
about him in amazement. Three miles must 
have been covered in that half-hour of madness, 
and he had entered an entirely different country. 
He was still in the jungle, but everywhere were 
rocks, small ones and big ones, some as large as 
a house. He stood in a maze of steep gullies and 
rugged ravines, some of which were choked with 
undergrowth and running vines, impossible to 
penetrate. He was in the heart of the foothills. 

The rocks were alive with lizards, which scam- 
pered about the lichened surfaces or basked in the 
waning beams of the sun, which, having broken 
through its wall of cloud, lingered low in the west, 
close to the tree-tops. The reptiles were of 
many colors, but chiefly combinations of blue 
and green, and even purple. Paul noticed one 
which was pure pea-green, with vertical shields 
rising from the ridge of its back. It scuttled off 
at the approach of a larger member of the same 
family, a giant iguana. This was a small one 
of its kind, hardly three feet long, dark gray, 
spotted with white and green, and with the same 
upright plates on its back. 

The boy gave scant thought to the lizards. 
He was more interested in his own predicament. 



He realized that the camp lay somewhere directly 
beneath the sinking sun, and started off in that 
direction. 

The going was extremely rough and arduous 
and caused him to wonder how he had penetrated 
that far without a broken neck. The way was 
full of pitfalls, and several times he paused 
abruptly to prevent a tumble down a steep bank 
or over some sheer drop of twenty feet. The 
walls of the ravine hid the sun from view and 
caused him considerable extra labor. Several 
times he was compelled to climb their rough 
sides to obtain his bearings and then drop back 
to continue his march. 

It was discouraging work and very slow. Pres- 
ently he gave it up as a bad job and prepared to 
camp for the night. The sun had sunk below 
the trees. 

As Paul made up his mind to halt, his ear 
caught a low grunt resembling the hollow boom 
of a bass-drum. The sound changed to a chick, 
chick, repeated slowly many times. He smiled 
to himself. Trumpeters! Here at any rate was 
meat for his supper. 

Advancing cautiously, he caught sight of sev- 
eral birds moving on the ground. Mere forms 
they were, for their purples and grays blended 
so with the shadows that only their outlines 
could be seen as they stalked past on their thin, 
stiltlike legs. The next instant one fell before 
his gun and the others flew squawking and rum- 
bling into the trees, where they hid themselves 
in the upper branches. 

After building a rough shelter against a con- 
venient rock, he examined his trophy. Its body 
was about the size of a white Leghorn hen, but 
there the resemblance stopped. The small head 
was mounted on a long, thin neck, such as is 
found on a curlew, but with a short bill. The 
legs were long and heron-like, causing the trum- 
peter to stand about eighteen inches above the 
ground. Though purely a forest-living bird, 
with no love for the marshes or water, it is really 
an aberrant stork. 

That evening the lost boy roasted the trum- 
peter over a fire and pronounced it excellent. As 
he had no blanket, he accumulated a large store 
of wood against the coolness of the night, and 
lay down on his bed of leaves. Presently, tired 
as he was, he slept. 

He was awakened some hours later by the 
baying of a hound close by. Hurriedly tossing 
some wood on the fire, he seized his gun and 
crouched by the blaze. 

Again came the resonant sound, and was echoed 
from all about him. Paul set his jaws together 
and made ready for the attack. Evidently a full 
pack was running and would be upon him directly. 



712 



BOY HUNTERS IN DEMERARA 



More fuel was added to the blaze, causing the 
light to spread many yards through the jungle. 
He could hear the hissing of bats and the swishing 
of their wings outside the circle of light, but was 
bothered little by them. From far off came a 
muffled serenade by howlers. But it was the 
wild echoes around him which caused the roots 
of his hair to tingle. 

The baying continued, but drew no closer. 
He was relieved by this, but kept an active watch. 

Suddenly a howl came from overhead ! What 
was that? The hounds up a tree? Impossible! 
Perhaps it came from the top of the rock. No; 
it was in that sapling by the fire. 

He drew a sigh of relief. It could n't be dogs 
if that was the case. But they must be some 
other kind of terrible animal, cats probably! 
That was even worse. 

For an hour the noise continued, sometimes 
approaching, sometimes receding, all but the 
animals in the sapling, and they maintained a 
continuous uproar. 

Emboldened at length by their evident fear of 
the fire, Paul determined to discover what they 
were. He cast another armful of wood on the 
blaze, and, when that had ignited well, advanced 
toward the sapling, holding his gun ready. 

To his astonishment, there was nothing in the 
little tree. He could see its entire outline in the 
firelight. There was no dark mass crouching 
among its small branches, and no yellow eyes 
gleamed down at him. But the creature was 
there; he could hear it ! 

With a hesitating movement he grasped a low- 
branch and drew the sapling down. As its leafy 
head neared the ground, a tiny object fell from 
it and hopped toward the fire. An instant later 
he held it in his hands. It was a frog! 

By nine o'clock the sun had risen high enough for 
Paul to use it again as a guide. Refreshed by his 
sleep, he set forth in high spirits. It would not 
take long to reach camp now. 

An hour of travel brought him to a stream 
down which he blithely turned. This, no doubt, 
would lead him to the creek and thence to the 
bateau. He would explain how matters stood 
with Fred and the crippled Indian, and a ham- 
mock would be sent at once. 

The sun crept slowly to its meridian and 
passed toward the west. Doubts commenced to 
enter the boy's mind. Why had he not come to 
the creek? Surely he had traveled far enough. 
Moreover, he was hungry. Two hours more of 
t he stream and he sat down, disheartened. There 
could be no dodging the question now; the brook 
did not lead to the creek ! 

(To be coi 



Paul was dismayed, but not panic-stricken as 
on the previous day. He apparently was lost 
beyond recovery, but took the matter philosophic- 
ally, and cast about for ways to extricate him- 
self. For the past five hours his direction had 
been about due west. Why he had not come 
upon the creek, which ran north and south, he 
could not understand. But the fact remained 
that he had not; and now what was he to do? 

01 a certainty the camp was aroused by this 
time and all were searching for the missing hun- 
ters. He had little worry concerning the welfare 
of Fred and his companion; Jack or one of the 
Indians would pick up Wa'na's trail and soon 
locate them. As for himself it was a different 
matter; he had left no trail. But why had he 
not? 

The boy snapped his fingers in vexation with 
himself. If he had blazed his way as he came, 
one of the Indians sooner or later was bound to 
have run across it. His mind was made up,. He 
would remain where he was, build himself a camp, 
and run trails out in several directions on the 
chance that they would be discovered by the 
searchers. 

An accounting of his ammunition showed that 
he still had twelve cartridges left, sufficient to 
last several days. He had matches and a hunt- 
ing-knife. So it was with a comparatively light 
heart that he constructed a shelter in a cleared 
space on the bank of the stream. 

When that was completed, it was nearly four 
o'clock, and he felt more hungry' than ever. His 
last meal had consisted of a meager breakfast 
on the remnants of the trumpeter. A hunt for 
food was in order, and he set out with the idea 
of walking for an hour directly away from camp, 
and then back over the same trail. As may be 
judged, his path was closely marked every few 
feet with broken twigs and uprooted bushes. He 
could take no chances of getting lost again. 

As fortune would have it, he saw no game 
worthy of his limited supply of ammunition until 
the return journey. He was passing beneath a 
tree heavily draped with fig- vines, when a loud 
roar, like the bellow of a bull, greeted him from 
its branches. Hastily looking up, he was greeted 
by a strange sight. Two male howling monkeys 
were in the throes of battle on a lower limb. 

Fascinated, Paul watched them for the space 
of five minutes. Then hunger recalled him to 
action, and not waiting to see the outcome of the 
battle, he fired. 

One of the combatants fell, and staggering un- 
der its weight, Paul soon reached his camp. That 
night he tasted roast monkey for the first time 
and enjoyed its sweetish flavor. 

eluded) 



EVERYTHING FAILED 



Early one morning in our house in Jamaica I 
was awakened by a loud "Meow! meow!" I looked 
out of my window. There, on the tall tree which 
grows in the back yard, was a cat. 

I left for college and thought nothing about it. 
When I returned, however, 
the tree was surrounded by 
all of the women of the neigh- 
borhood, who were trying to 
lure the cat down with pans 
of milk and vain cries of 
"Kitty, kitty!" And at in- 
tervals came that loud wail, 
"Meow! meow!" 

Three days of suffering 
passed. Finally, I was chosen 
to go to the authorities and 
have them bring down that 
cat. I went to the society 
with the long name — the So- 
ciety for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Animals. After I 
had told my story, the official 
said, "Fill out this form in 
triplicate." It was a very 
long form, but I patiently 
filled it out. 

Then he asked, "Has it affected your nerves?" 

"Yes, it 's affected the nerves of the whole 
neighborhood!" 

"Then you have come to the wrong place. Go 
to the board of health." 

I went to the board of health. Again I was 
asked if my nerves had been affected. 

"Well, call it that, if you want to; anything to 
get the cat down." 




EDWARD ROCHIE HARDY 



"Fill out this form in duplicate, then take one 
copy to the fire department and they Ml send over 
a man with a ladder." 

Then I betook myself to a fire department 
station. The first man to whom I gave my paper 
looked at it from all sides and 
then handed it over to his 
superior. 

"Oh," he said, "you 've 
made a mistake. You should 
take this to the — th precinct 
police station." 

I went to the — th precinct 
police station. They told 
me that I must go to the sta- 
tion of my own precinct, two 
miles away. I went there. 
After I had filled out another 
form, they said they would 
send over a workman. 

Three hours later a great 
big burly Irishman arrived 
with a ladder and a pistol 
and said the police had sent 
him over to shoot the cat. 
That was n't what I wanted, 
but the cat had better be 
shot than die of starvation. I showed the Irish- 
man into the back yard. 

He placed his ladder against the tree and 
was about to mount when he saw that the cat 
was black. 

"Begorra," he said, "if I kill that cat, it '11 
haunt me for seven years." I was in despair. 

Just then the cat slowly walked down the tree 
and disappeared. 

Edward Rochie Hardv. 



FANCY FREE— THE AVIATOR'S TRIBUTE 

By BERNARD CLARKE 



Above the busy world I go, 
My wings flash in the sun, 

The cross-wires whistle in the breeze- 
My plane and I are one. 

We pass a home-bound flock of geese- 

They swerve to let us by; 
We laugh to see men toil below, 

My sturdy "ship" and I. 

In all the seasons of the year 
We frisk about the skyway; 



While man runs out his meager race 
Below, on dusty highway. 

Up, up, my good bird soars aloft! 

For altitude she 's frantic! 
While in the distance far I see 

The heaving old Atlantic. 

Above the busy world I '11 go, 

A daring race I '11 run. 
Till the grim Reaper calls to me, 

My plane and I are one. 



713 



"THE BLUE BYKE" 



By DAVID Q. HAMMOND 



"George Usher! How many times must I tell 
you to stop that mournful whistle? You will 
drive me insane!" 

"Oh, Mother, can't I even whistle? I can't 
have a wheel; I can't have anything!" 

"Don't say that, son. Father and I try very 
hard to give you all we can. The necessities cost 
so much nowadays that we have very little left 
to buy such things, much as we should like to do 
so." 

"Dad had a wheel when he was my age." 

"I know it, son," said Mrs. Usher, rubbing her 
hand through his tousled hair. "I wish with all 
my heart that you could have one, too, but I don't 
see how you can. Did you fill the wood-box?" 

"Yes, Mother." 

George ran out of the house and threw himself 
on the ground beneath the big pippimtree, back 
of the house. Tears of disappointment welled 
up in his eyes in spite of all he could do. His 
heart had been set on a brand-new blue "by-ke" 
that stood in the window of the hardware store. 
It was a perfect beauty, with its motor-cycle 
handle-bars, its stripped mud-guards, an electric 
headlight, and a baggage-carrier in the rear. 
Father said that the fifty dollars it cost was more 
than he could afford. If only George could earn 
the money himself! But it did seem like a great 
deal when you thought of earning it. 

George had no appetite for supper, but Mother 
shook her head when Father was about to ques- 
tion him. Uncle John, his mother's brother, 
dropped in to see them in the evening, as he 
wanted to talk business with Mr. Usher. George 
sat in one corner of the living-room with his 
history before him, but his mind was on the win- 
dow of the hardware store. 

"What was the best business proposition you 
ever had, John?" Mr. Usher asked after awhile. 

Uncle John laughed. "The very best was when 
I was George's age." 

George looked up all attention on hearing his 
name mentioned. 

"We had a small chicken-house in the back 
yard, but no chickens. One day I asked Father if 
I might have some, and he agreed. That was my 
first and best venture, for I could n't lose. Father 
bought the chickens, paid for the feed, paid me 
for the eggs, and I ate them. Now you can't 
beat that, can you?" 

"No, I can't," laughed Mr. Usher; "but did n't 
your father soon tire of that?" 

"Yes— he did. But not until after I was well 



started. Then I was able to buy my own feed 
with what I received from the eggs and chickens 
I sold. I took all the extra ones to the store. I 
made real money from them. Every week I 
put a little more in my bank, and eggs were cheap 
in those days, too." 
t "Dad, may I keep chickens?" George broke 
in, all excitement. "We have a place for them, 
and I '11 take care of them and tend the garden! 
too. You '11 never have to show me the weeds, 
either, if only you '11 let me keep chickens." 

"We '11 see, son. It means a great deal of work, 
and we must n't start something we are not go- 
ing to finish. I '11 let you know next Monday, 
George." 

George knew what his father said was final ; and 
although he was too excited for sleep that night, 
he did n't mention the subject again. On Satur- 
day, however, he spent most of the day in the 
chicken-house, cleaning and scrubbing and white- 
washing. 

. When he came home from school on Monday, 
his father met him at the gate. 

"Come out back, son," he said, leading the way 
to the little house. He opened the door, and 
there, scratching away in the straw, were ten of 
the purest white, white-Leghorn pullets you ever 
saw. George was beside himself with delight. 

"Oh, Dad, thank you ever so much! Oh 
Mother!" he called. 

But his mother was right behind him and an- 
swered, "Come and see what we have in the 
kitchen." 

He ran on ahead. As he opened the kitchen 
door the cheep-cheep-cheep that greeted him told 
him that baby chicks were there. Sure enough, 
in a big cardboard carton behind the stove were 
an even hundred fluffy little yellow balls. He 
was speechless with excitement; but when Father 
opened the book of instructions for the amateur 
poultryman, which had been sent by the hatchery 
from which the chicks had been bought, George 
turned to look over his father's shoulder. As 
they studied the book together, it was hard to 
decide which was the bigger boy, and the mother 
was as interested as they. 

Hovers for the youngsters were easily and 
quickly made from cheese-boxes by cutting a 
little door at the bottom, so that they might run 
in and out. Three nails were driven in the side 
of each box about three inches from the bottom, 
and wire hoops were made to fit the inside of the 
box and rest on these nails. 



714 



THE BLUE BYKE 



715 




"GEORGE WITH HIS HISTORY BEFORE HIM, BUT HIS MIND ON THE WINDOW OF THE HARDWARE STORE" 



"Now, Mother, if you will sew some old flannel 
on the hoops for us, so that it will drop down on 
the backs of the little fellows, we will keep them 
snug and warm." 

"Will that keep them warm, Father?" 

"Yes. The heat of their bodies against each 
other will be enough, for we will bring them into 
the kitchen at night." 

George did not need to be called in the morning. 
He was the first one up, and glad indeed to find 
that the chicks had passed the night successfully. 
After breakfast he gave them some hard-boiled 
egg, chopped fine, and bread-crumbs, and plenty 
of sour milk to drink. It was a joy to watch the 
little fellows tap away at the food and stand 
around the saucers of milk, throwing their little 
heads far back as they drank. As it was best to 
feed them every three hours, Mother volunteered 
to tend them while George was at school. I 
really think she enjoyed them quite as much as 
George and Father. In fact, I am sure she did. 

One afternoon, George was delighted to find 
an egg in one of the nests. The next day he 
found three, then two, and the next, six. From 
then on, not a day passed that he did not have 
some eggs to mark down in the ledger Father had 
given him for his accounts. 

School was soon over, and George was delighted 
with the prospect of having more time to spend 
with his pets. Nor did he forget his promise to 
his father about caring for the large family gar- 
den. It was fun to dig in the garden with his 



flock of little chickens around him as they followed 
his hoe along the rows, picking up the bugs and 
worms. Never before had the garden been so 
well kept. They had far more vegetables than 
they could use themselves, and one day his father 
told him that he might sell the extra vegetables 
and have the money for his bank. 

Gradually his savings grew. Nearer and 
nearer seemed that wheel that Father and 
Mother thought he had forgotten. With the 
ten-dollar gold-piece Uncle John had given him 
for Christmas, he had nineteen dollars in the 
bank — nearly half enough ! 

One morning, as he was coming back from an 
errand for Mother, he met Uncle John. 

"Will you give your mother this birthday gift 
for me?" he said, holding out a small package. 

"Is this Mother's birthday?" 

"It sure is. Did n't you know it?" 

"I 'd forgotten, Uncle John. Of course I will 
give it to her. When are you coming over to see 
my chickens again?" 

"I '11 be over soon," said his uncle, as he nodded 
a good-by. 

On his way home, George thought of all the 
help his mother had given him in caring for his 
chickens and how neatly she had arranged the 
vegetables for him. "Mother has been awfully 
good to me," he said. "I wonder if it would 
please her if I bought a birthday gift for her." 
x\utomatically, his footsteps turned toward the 
hardware store. "I guess 1 '11 ask Mr. Elting 




716 



THE BLUE BYKE 




HERE IS THE YOUNG MAN WHO GREW THAT TOMATO" (SEE NEXT PAGE) 



what Mother might like," he thought, as he 
gazed longingly at the blue byke. 

As he entered the store Mr. Elting smiled from 
behind the counter and said, "Well, young man, 
do you want that bicycle?" 

"Yes, I want it some day, but not now, Mr. 
Elting. This is Mother's birthday, and I want 
something for her. I wonder what she 'd like?" 

"Here is a nice hreless cooker that she has al- 
ways admired, George," the storekeeper said 
laughingly, enjoying his joke immensely; "or 
would you prefer a nice bread -knife?" 

"How much is the cooker?" 

"Fifteen dollars." 

"D-d-did Mother say she would like one?" 

"Yes, George, she was admiring it only yester- 
day. But don't think about it, my boy; it 's too 
expensive. I was only joking. We have some 
dandy new bread-knives that are just the thing." 

George took a long, lingering look at the blue 
byke and then turned to Mr. Elting. "Will you 
send up that cooker this afternoon?" he said. 
"I '11 come right back with the money." And he 
ran out of the store before Mr. Elting had re- 
covered from his astonishment. 

After taking the necessary money from his 
bank, George ran back to the store. It was a 
proud boy who passed the window, with head up, 



saying to himself, "I don't want the old wheel, 
anyway!" He laid his money on the counter; 
nor could he resist telling Mr. Elting, as he 
pocketed his receipt, "I earned part of that myself." 

Mother was the proud one that night, but 
George could not understand why she cried when 
she met Father at the door. 

A few days later, his father asked George to 
come out into the garden with him. As they 
were walking up and down the rows, Mr. Usher 
noticed an enormous tomato on one of the vines. 

"What have you here, son?" 

"Is n't that a beauty, Father? And have you 
noticed the cauliflower?" 

"Why, no, 1 have n't," Mr. Usher replied. 
Later, when they had finished inspecting the 
garden he said, "You Ye done well, son. Chick- 
ens and a garden make a good combination. We 
have never had one like this before. We must 
place an exhibit in the garden show next week." 

With his father's help George placed his entries 
in the show — a fine sight it was, too, made up of 
his best specimens. All the town was there, and 
many were the cries of wonderment bestowed on 
the mammoth tomato. Great was his delight 
when he learned that the blue ribbon of first prize 
had been awarded to his exhibit. 

While he was gathering up his produce after 



THE BLUE BYKE 



717 



the show was over he heard a voice behind him 
say, "Here is the young man who grew that 
tomato." 

George turned. There was Mr. Elting and a 
strange gentleman beside him. "This is Mr. 
Castle, the seed man, George," he said. 

George shook hands heartily, but acknowledged 
Mr. Castle's compliments to him on his success 
with some embarrassment. 

"Young man, that is the handsomest tomato I 
have ever seen. As it is our business to obtain 
such prizes for our stock, it gives me great pleasure 
to offer you fifty dollars for that splendid speci- 
men, and all the seed you can use next year." 

"Do you mean that you are offering me five 
dollars for one tomato?" stammered George, who 
thought he had misunderstood the sum named. 

"Not five, but fifty. It will be worth more than 
that to us for advertising, as Mr. Elting tells me 
it was grown from our seed." 

George was speechless for a moment, but, at 
Mr. Elting's suggestion, gladly accepted the 
offer. With fifty dollars in his pocket, he ran 
straight for the hardware store. All his longing 
for the bicycle had returned in full force; his face 
glowed in anticipation. As he neared the store 



he- strained his eyes at the window. 1 1 was 
empty! With a sinking heart, he entered the 
store and asked the clerk for the wheel. 

"Mr. Elting sold it this morning, George; I 'm 
awfully sorry. But we have others just as good." 

"I don't want any just as good," said George, 
unable to conceal his disappointment. No won- 
der, after waiting so long without being able to 
buy it; and now, when he had the money, the 
wheel was gone ! He walked slowly home. What 
good was the money in his pocket? It would not 
buy him the one thing he wanted. 

As he came into the house, his mother called, 
"Is that you, George?" 

"Yes, Mother." 

"Did you feed the chickens?" 

"No, Mother." 

"It will soon be dark. You had better hurry." 
He walked slowly out the back door, his eyes 
dejectedly on the ground. When he finally 
looked up he gave a whoop of joy. What was 
that leaning against the chicken-house? It was 
the blue byke! On a tag, tied to the handle-bars, 
was written, 

"To the son of whom we are so proud. 
• With love from Mother and Father." 






















H t"'i Si 


1 
















■) 


3*£v 





WHAT WAS THAT LEANING AGAINST THE CHICKEN-HOUSE? IT WAS THE BLUE BYKE!' 



KIT, PAT AND A FEW BOYS 

By BETH B. GILCHRIST 

Author of "Cinderella's Granddaughter" 

SYNOPSIS OF THE FIRST INSTALMENT 
When Mother was summoned to Bermuda on account of Aunt Isabelle's .health what ™ e v *u ■ u 

their unexpected guest ? m ° ther declde t0 stay at home ' at temporarily, with 



CHAPTER IV 

KATHERINE DOES N't CARE 

To Katherine Embury, Mrs. Ward's invitation 
presented a simple and natural solution of her 
difficulty, and she accepted it without scruple. 
Girls had stayed at her mother's on as slight 
acquaintance. She was conscious of thinking, in 
the bustle of departure the next morning, it was 
lucky for her the entire household was not going. 

Standing a bit aloof under the vines, as became 
a stranger, she heard Phil say to Pat, "Now don't 
you forget what I told you, old lady. Previous 
engagement and all that sort of thing. It 's up to 
you to manage somehow." And Pat had replied : 
"Oh, I '11 try. You know I '11 do my best, Phil." 

This was Greek to Katherine, who, neverthe- 
less, quietly moved a step or two farther away; 
but she could not help seeing Nick dash up with a 
silky brown puppy, which he bundled unceremoni- 
ously into his sister's arms, nor help hearing a few 
words: " — homesick at Stone's — you see to him. 
Take him back when — you know, if — " 

Then Marian and Aunt Ida came out, and 
everybody kissed Mrs. Ward, and Marian clung 
to her in a seesaw of tears and expectancy, while 
Mr. Ward's deep voice adjured, "Hurry up, peo- 
ple; trains wait for no man — or woman, either." 
"Never go into the water unless Father or Aunt 
Ida says you may," Katherine heard Mrs. Ward 
counsel. "Do just as Aunt Ida says, dear, and be 
sure to write me everything that happens. Now 
run along, sweetheart. She 's coming, Father." 
There they went, streaming helter-skelter down 
the path and out into the street, turning half-way 
to the corner to wave at the figures they had left. 
It was all very intimate and warm and important, 
curiously important, somehow. Turning quickly, 
Katherine surprised Pat's eyes full of tears. 

Pat caught the astonished glance, blushed, cov- 
ered her tears with a wry little smile, and dropped, 
puppy in hand, to the veranda steps. 
"Come, let 's play with him." 



Katherine sank down beside her. "You care 
a lot about their going, don't you?" 

"Why, of course," said Pat. "I 'm daffy over 
the boys. You know how it is. You have a 
brother yourself." 

Katherine remembered the unconcern with 
which she and Don viewed each other's move- 
ments, and Pat went on: 

"I remember him as an awfully nice boy. 
Pretty bossy with the goats, but I guess you have 
to be bossy with goats. You must hate to have 
him 'way out there in Wyoming." 

"Of course, it is rather far," Katherine acknowl- 
edged. 

"And when they are away 'most all the year in 
college, the way the boys are— Don 's in college, 
is n't he?" 

"A sophomore— no, a junior, since last week." 

"Phil 's a junior, too. It nearly killed me the 
first year. He and I had always been such chums. 
And to have him away— Then last year Fred 
went too. When Nick goes, I don't know what I 
shall do. He has one more year in high, thank 
goodness. Is Don as nice as he used to be?" 

"Oh yes." 

"He was a good-looking little boy." 

"I think you would call him good-looking now " 

"Tall?" 

"Six feet, one and a half." 
"Jolly! I like 'em tall." 

"He is broad, too. Plays football, you know. 
Made his letter last year. They put him in for 
four minutes of play in the last game." 

"I know how you felt. Proud! Well rather! 
Were you there yourself?" 

"Oh no, I — He did n't tell us he was going to 
play." 

"Modest. That 's good, too. Do you know, 
you 're a wonderful girl, Katherine Embury." 

"I wonder what you mean by that." 

"You 're modest, too. If I were telling some- 
body about Phil— Well!" 

A faint flush mounted in the guest's cheeks. 



718 



KIT, PAT AND A FEW BOYS 



719 



Pat's tongue raced on. "But then, of course, 
I have three, so I have a right to be three times 
as proud, and maybe it 's excusable when you are 
three times a thing to show it a little. Only I 
know if I had just Phil, I 'd never be able to act 
modest about him. But there! I can't sit here 
all the morning, can you? I simply must do some- 
thing strenuous." 

"Anything you like." 

"Tennis?" 

"Very jolly, thank you." 

"Good! There 's a court on the next street. 
You like a rather hea\y racket, don't you?" 
"Fairly heavy." 
"I thought so." 

On the way to the closet under the stairs to 
choose rackets they passed the room where Mrs. 
Ward sat at a desk. _ ( 

"I am writing your mother, Kathenne, she 
called softly. "I am asking her to trust me with 
her daughter." 

Katherine smiled into the strong, gentle face. 
"I know she will." Then she leaned forward and 
her gray eyes looked straight into the dark ones. 
"Please do not let my coming be a nuisance. I 
noticed Patricia doing things for you, helping 
about the house. Won't you let me do things, 
too?" 

"Indeed I will." Pat's mother bent swiftly 
and kissed the delicate cheek. "I shall feel that 
I have two daughters at home now." . 

"Oh, thank you!" The girl's face warmed 
under the caress. ' 'We were going to play tennis, 

but—" , . 

"I am glad of that. It will help Pat forget for 
a while how much she is missing her brothers." 

Thoughtfully Katherine joined Pat in the hall. 

"Here are the boys'," said Pat, "and Father's 
racket, and mine. Which will you have? I can 
use one of the boys' just as well if you like mine 
best." 

"So can I," said Katherine, testing the rackets. 

Thereupon they proceeded to the tennis-court 
on the next street, and the ache at Pat's heart 
rapidly diminished under the necessity of putting 
all her strength and skill into the game. 

"I shall get to be rather fancy if I play much 
with you," she told Katherine, after the set. 
"Nick's game is n't much better than mine, but 
Phil is a crackerjack, and Fred plays almost as 
well. I did n't have them till a week ago to pull 
up my play. Now what shall we do this after- 
noon?" 

"Oh, anything. It won't matter." 
"Don't say that. Of course it matters." 
"Does it?" Katherine regarded the other girl 
smilingly. "How excited you get over things!" 
"I know it," ruefully. "But I 'd rather get ex- 



cited than not care— Honestly, does n't it mat- 
ter to you what we do this afternoon?" 

"No. Does it to you — really?" 

"Most certainly it does. It matters tremend- 
ously to me every minute of the day what I do. 
I expect you 're like that, too. You meant, did 
n't you, that you had n't decided yet what to 
want to do? You were waiting for me to suggest 
something. Or perhaps you were just being 
polite." 

An impulse stirred Katherine, the impulse to 
explore, to question. "I meant what I said," she 
told Pat, simply. "I like well enough to do a 
great many things. I liked to play tennis this 
morning. I should have liked equally well to do 
something else. Is n't that, after all, the way you 
feel?" 

Pat's laugh bubbled to her lips. "Oh, dear no! 
Of course I know I exaggerate more or less when I 
talk, but, making all possible allowances, that 
description would n't fit me at all." 

"Do you really love tennis?" 

"Well, yes, I do. Not, of course, as I love 
Nick— But, yes, I love it. And I loathe croquet. 
That 's the difference. Of course, everybody has 
choices." 

"Have they?" Katherine meditated. 

"How do you put it when you want something 
terribly?" Pat inquired. 

"Why, I don't. Do you?" 

Incredulity looked out of the brown face. "I 
beg your pardon, but you can't possibly have 
meant what you said." 

It was Katherine's turn to be surprised. "I 
don't think I understand you. Most girls have 
stopped 'wanting things terribly' when they get 
to be as old as we are." 

"None of the girls I know have stopped. I can 
think of a dozen things this minute— well, half a 
dozen anyway, one in particular — that I want 

terribly." 

"Really? That 's funny, is n't it!" 

"Don't you want anything— enough to cry for 
it?" The question pushed in astonished wonder 
past Pat's lips. 

"No," said Katherine, still smiling. 

Under the scrutiny of the gray eyes, the wonder 
in Pat's face changed to horror; the horror, to 
something else, faint and indefinable, that Kather- 
ine could not name. 

"Did n't you ever?" Pat persisted, regardless 
of manners. 

Katherine wrinkled her delicate brows in an 
effort to remember. She had an odd feeling 
that her self-respect was at stake, without at all 
understanding why it should be so. 

"Not since I was eight," she said, "and there 
was a doll that I could not have. It belonged to 



720 



anotherlittle girl, and Mother could not find its 
double. 

'Then you did n't want the right things," Pat 
said, with conviction, "or else you got them all " 
'Oh yes, I got them." 
"Oh, you poor dear! I 'm so sorry." 
The indefinable thing was quite clear now shin- 
ing compassionately out of Pat's liquid brown 
eyes. Katherine recognized it at last with a 
start of incredulity. Pity! A str ange feeling 

pT? wl th l gir1 ' a faint wave of repugnance 
my: Why should any one pity her? Bewil- 
dered resentment stirred in Katherine's heart. 

"Oh, I am so sorry," Pat's warm friendly voice 
was saying. "It must be perfectly dreadful to 
teel that way— not to care about things. Why I 
—I would n't want to be alive if I could n't care 
it s glorious to want a thing so much that you 
fairly ache with wanting it, to hope and plan and 
dream and contrive and then to have it come 
true- Oh, it 's glorious! To want a thing so 
hard that it seems as though you might die of 
wanting, even if you don't get it— that 's not so 
glorious, but I don't believe I 'd be willing to miss 
it. It must be so dull not to want things!" The 
words came out with a little explosive spurt 

"Perhaps it is dull," Katherine acknowledged 
She had never thought of her life in such terms 
but, in contrast with this vivid experience, her 
own sensations seemed colorless and drab. "I 
had thought all girls were like that. If not, I 
must be queer." 

The conversation, punctuated by frequent halts 
had brought them at last to the home gate' 
Now, as they turned, a girl's voice hailed them 
W hy, Pat Ward ! You 're the last person I ex- 
pected to see. What in the world are you doing 
here? I thought you had started for camp." 

"Oh, that was the boys, Carlotta," said Pat 
quickly, falling a step behind Katherine and ges- 
ticulating frantically for silence. "They went off 
with Father this morning. Did you know Kath- 
erine Embury when she used to visit Miss Brunt? 
Carlotta Hyde lives on the same street as your 
aunt, Katherine, three or four houses away." 

All of a sudden Pat had become tremendously 
concerned to keep Katherine from discovering 
what had happened. 

"Do you know, Mother," she explained that 
night, "for all Katherine is so pretty and sweet 
and has such lovely clothes and beautiful manners 
and such a fascinating voice, I don't believe she 
is very happy." 

p has n't the appearance of an unhappy girl, 

"Not unhappy, exactly— just not happy. Any- 
way, I 'd hate to have her find out she had inter- 
rupted our summer." 



KIT, PAT AND A FEW BOYS 



CHAPTER V 

THE DISCOVERY 



It was inevitable that the slip should occur 
Afterward, Katherine looked back on a 
significant happenings, and blamed herself for her 
blindness not to have seen their meaning. That 
the meltable did not happen for three days re- 
flects credit on Pat's precautionary measures. 

1 hen there was a garden-party. The fact tha< 
it was a garden-party is insignificant; as far as the 
disaster was concerned, it might as easily have 
been a sewing-bee or a luncheon or even a prayer- 
meeting. Look after her while I 'm serving " 
Pat had warned Carlotta, "and don't let anybody 
talk to her about our summer camp. From that 
they would be sure to go on to asking if she 
knew when Mother and I are going up and why 
we did n t go when the rest went." 

But who could avert Daphne Vane's happy 
shout? Daphne, motoring through the town that 
had been her home a year ago, had been swept 
mto the garden-party, and Daphne had one of 
those clear, distinct voices that lift the lightest 
word above a buzz of speech or clatter of china 
Oh, there 's Pat Ward !" she cried. "I did n't 
expect to see her. She wrote me they were all 
going to camp last Friday. Oh Pat, Pat, dar- 
ling! 

The soft words carried straight to Katherine's 
ears. She saw Pat's eyes meet Daphne's, and 
into her face flash welcoming gladness. She 
heard Pat's joyous, "Daphne! What are you do- 
ing? Motoring? It 's perfectly grand to see vou '" 
Katherine turned to Carlotta Hyde. 
" You were surprised to see Patricia the morning 
1 first met you." 
"Was I?" 

"A few other people have been less surprised 
since then. Now that I think of it, Pat has al- 
ways managed to shut them off as she shut off 
Miss Vane a moment ago. Were Mrs. Ward and 
fat planning to go to camp with the others?" 

"Since you ask me," answered Carlotta 
gravely, "they were." 

It was then, automatically, that Katherine 
began to remember. Happenings, allusions, ret- 
icences, unnoticed when they took place, flashed 
back into the girl's consciousness. Words and 
actions that had had no significance for her at the 
time now fell into position like pieces of a picture- 
puzzle when a missing part is supplied. In one 
swift moment of insight she perceived what it was 
that she had done. A hurt, shamed feeling took 
her by the throat and choked her. 

"Thank you," she told Carlotta, quietly "I 
have been very stupid." But she was not quiet 
within when Pat found her. 



722 



KIT, PAT AND A FEW BOYS 



[June 



"I don't want to hurry you away," began Pat. 

"You are not doing so. I am quite ready to go." 

They passed through a sheltering hedge into 
the street before either spoke. Then Pat said, 
"Carlotta told me." 

Katherine did not look at the other girl. She 
found it difficult to speak. "Why did n't you 
tell me you were going away?" 

"Because we wanted you to stay with us." 

"In that case you might have asked me to go 
too." 

"We thought of it, but Mother said it would be 
taking an unfair advantage of you." 

"I don't understand." 

"You don't know our camp." 

"It would n't have hurt me to learn." 

"Oh, but it might. You might n't have liked 
it a bit." 

"I can't see that whether I liked or disliked it 
makes any difference." 

"Maybe not to you. It would have made a 
difference to us, if we had asked you." 

"What is the matter with your camp?" 

"There 's nothing the matter with it." Pat 
grew blunt in her turn. "The matter is with you. 
It is just a camp like all camps. You don't know 
anything about camps." 

"I should have preferred learning, to having 
been the cause of delaying you and your mother. 
However, it has been only for a few days. I am 
going away to-morrow." 

Pat stopped short. "But you can't." 

"Yes, I can. If nowhere else, I can go home." 

"Your mother would n't like that. She thinks 
you are with us for the summer. Or she will 
think so when she gets Mother's letter." 

"She would like less to have me interfering 
with all your plans." 

"You are n't. I mean, I like to have you inter- 
fere." 

"What was the thing that you wanted more 
than anything else in the world, that you wanted 
enough to cry for it?" The question challenged 
like a glove in the face. 

Pat's color mounted. 

"That was three days ago." 

"Was n't it to go to camp with your brothers?" 

"Yes, it was, if you must know. But I tell you 
that was three days ago, and — " 

"You will be free to start to-morrow." 

"Oh, Katherine!" Pat stole a glance at the 
stern young face beside her. "Don't talk so. 
I 'd hate to go that way. And what about my 
mother?" 

" Your mother?" 

"Do you think she would have an easy minute 
if you went off the way you 're talking about 
doing now?" 



Katherine frowned. "No," she conceded, "I 
suppose not. I don't see but you will have to 
take me to camp." 

"Our camp," Pat told her, "is thirtv miles from 
anything bigger than a village. We sleep on 
boughs and we eat off wooden plates and we wear 
our oldest clothes. We take turns cooking and 
getting up in the morning to go for the milk. 
And we never dress up, except to put on a clean 
jumper." 

"That does n't scare me." 

"But. don't you see how different everything is 
from all the ways you Ye ever lived before?" 

"And don't you see," Katherine retorted, "that 
what I have learned this afternoon has made .my 
position here intolerable?" 

Mrs. Ward, rocking on the deep veranda, noted 
the faces of the girls coming up the path, Pat's, 
excited and troubled, Katherine's, unwontedly 
flushed and stern. 

"Mother, Katherine thinks we might take her 
to camp." 

"Why, certainly," said Mrs. Ward, pleasantly. 
"We will go down town to-morrow morning and 
help her purchase her outfit. I had just been 
thinking that we three might go up in a day or 
two and surprise the camp." 

"But — but what if she hates it?" Pat gasped. 

"What if I do?" Katherine returned coolly. 
"I am really rather curious to see." 

But with every hour, Pat's fears mounted. 
"If I did n't love it so myself," she confided to her 
mother the night before the}' were to start, "I 
should n't care so much. Oh, do you suppose she 
will like it?" 

"I can't tell, dear," answered her mother tran- 
quilly. "But I have seen enough of her to be 
certain of one thing — if Katherine does n't like 
camp, we shall never know it." 

CHAPTER VI 

INTRODUCING BIRCH CAMP 

A two-seated wagon containing four people, 
with a steamer-trunk strapped on at the back, 
drove into a clearing in the woods that clothed 
three sides of a Vermont lake. The hour was five 
o'clock, and the lake, as far as the eye could see, 
was deserted. Deserted, too, was the camp that 
huddled in the clearing, two connecting tents, the 
larger facing the charred circle of a camp-fire, and, 
at right angles to these, a row of three, also look- 
ing out on the camp-fire and beyond it across the 
length of the lake. On either side of the level 
space where the camp was pitched, trees and 
bushes pushed down a gentle slope to the water's 
edge. On a smooth crescent of beach a flat-bot- 
tomed boat was drawn up; two birch canoes lay 
overturned on the sand above the water-line. 



KIT, PAT AND A FEW* BOYS 



723 



1021] 

Directly behind the dingy canvas of the tents 
towered a fir-dark bulk. 

"Oh, we have surprised them !" cried Pat, jump- 
ing out over the wheel. "How jolly! Look, 
Mother, our beds are made!" 

Katherine, at Pat's elbow, viewed the interior 
of one of the three tents curiously. Saplings at 
front and back supported the ridge-pole; a cord 
stretched between the 
two served both as 
clothes closet and to di- 
vide the tent. On one 
side lay what looked like 
four long, narrow heaps 
of twigs piled to varying 
heights; on the other, at 
the foot of the green 
oblongs, nearest the en- 
trance, stood a chestlike 
box and a trunk sur- 
rounded by a motley col- 
lection of rubber boots 

and tennis - shoes. Be- 
yond the first loomed a 

second, larger trunk. 
"Is that a bed?" 

Katherine's eye was on 

the rectangle nearest her. 

It appeared to be about 

two inches thick and 

was bounded by slender 

poles. At the head lay 

a roll, and a pillow in a 

dark green cover. 

"Beautiful beds!" 

Pat sniffed joyously. 

"Spruce! The best kind 

of bedding. These two 

are Aunt Ida's and Mar- 
ian's. You can tell by 

the thickness, they 're 

crushed down so. I ex- 
pect they were as high as 

those others before they 

were slept on. The boys 

will make you one. The 

last tent in this row is their and Father's sleep- 
ing-tent. The one between," she waved a hand 
toward the big tent "is the dining-room and also 
living-room on rainy days. Now come down to 
the lake, quick !" 

She drew Katherine down beside her and 
plunged Katherine's hand, with hers, into the cool 
water. "Birch Lake, this is my friend, Katherine 
Embury. And oh, I do hope you will like each 
other. Now let 's get into our camp things. 
Then we shall feel at home." 

The driver of the wagon had unstrapped the 



steamer-trunk and set it in place against the side 
of the sleeping-tent. Katherine produced a key 
and unlocked it, while Pat threw up the lid of the 
big trunk beside it and began recklessly tumbling 
out shoes, skirts, and middies. "We '11 put away 
our good clothes and never look at them again till 
the day we go home. I '11 lay out your things, 
Mater. High boots to-night or sneakers? 




" 'I VE BEEN PINING TO SEE HOW IT WOULD LOOK THAT WAY,' SAID PAT" 
(SEE NEXT PAGE) 

"High boots, thank you. Mosquitos like me 
too well for tennis-shoes." 

Plainly, Pat was ecstatically happy. Kather- 
ine watched her quick movements and deftly, 
silently, followed her example. Modish hat and 
suit, gloves, blouse, and stockings retired into ob- 
livion at the bottom of the steamer-trunk. On 
came stout boots — Katherine decided she would 
not yet try conclusions with mosquitos — and a 
white cotton middy. Pat had taken down her 
curly hair, swept the pins into a tray of the trunk, 
and now was brushing and braiding it in two fat 



724 KIT, PAT AN1 

little tails. The ends she proceeded to tie with big 
bows of red ribbon, before pinning up the braids. 

"The ribbon is a concession to the fact that we 
are fresh from civilization," she explained glibly. 
"Generally I just use a rubber band. Handier 
for the woods. Does n't catch on the under- 
brush." 

Katherine, lacing her boots, thought how like 
a little girl Pat looked, with her curly head and 
bright cheeks. Then she took down her own hair, 
and, calmly sitting on the lid of her trunk, with- 
out even a glance at the mirror, parted it in the 
middle and began to brajd. 

Pat stopped, half-way into an ancient brown 
skirt. "You old sport! I Ye been pining ever 
since I first saw you to see how it would look that 
way." 

"How does it look?" 

"Lovely ! It 's so long and there 's so much in 
each braid. They 're perfect ropes, for all they 're 
so silky. Does n't Katherine look sweet, 
Mother?" 

"Very sweet, dear, and, like you, about half as 
old as she actually is." 

Pat tossed two blue ribbons to the girl on the 
trunk. "They 're Marian's. She won't mind. 
I feel half as old, Mother. I feel— skittish." 

Her mother laughed. "Perhaps you would 
better go out and gallop it off." 

"When Katherine is read}'. I always act like a 
colt just let into the pasture when I get to camp. 
Oh, they 're coming!" Pat cried suddenly. "Let 's 
hide, and then all three of us burst out at once 
and 'boo' at them." She flattened herself 
against the side of the tent, her eye to the opening. 

Katherine had a sensation of a swift approach ; a 
long dingy length shot by, basket in hand, in a 
noiseless stride toward the kitchen. An impres- 
sion of black hair, black eyes, a dark, mobile face, 
familiar, yet unfamiliar, persisted in the girl's 
mind. After the first, in long leaps, bounded a 
second nondescript figure; others were framed 
by the open flies. It was an excited group, for 
everybody was talking at once, opening bas- 
kets, and gesticulating. Into the midst bounded 
Nick, scales in hand, and Phil followed. Mr. 
Ward took the scales, if dignified, scholarly 
Mr. Ward could have turned into this bronzed, 
flannel-shirted woodsman. 

"Squabble over which has the heaviest fish," 
Pat explained in Katherine's ear. "Let 's put 
Mother in the middle. Now then, in just a min- 
ute. Won't they jump, though ! Mow!" 
"Boo!" "Boo!" "Boo!" 

Hand in hand, they burst triumphantly out of 
the tent, Pat's gipsy face aglow with love and mis- 
chief, Mrs. Ward's twinkling merrily, even Kath- 
erine's smilingly expectant. 



A shout went up. Fish and scales fell together. 
Before Katherine's eyes, the picture broke, 
cinema-wise, into rapid motion. The whole 
group leaped for the new-comers, Phil in the lead. 
A hand shot out, thrust Phil aside, and Mrs. 
Ward, tall woman though she was, disappeared 
into the woodsman's arms. Marian clung around 
her mother's neck, threatening to strangle her, 
was picked off, and one of the boys gathered his 
mother into a great bear-hug. A vivid red bow 
was all that was to be seen of Pat. 

"Welcome to Birch Camp, Miss Katherine." 

It was the khaki woodsman, and now there was 
no mistaking Mr. Ward's kindly, quizzical eyes. 

"We are so glad to see you !" Sincerity rang in 
Aunt Ida's voice. "This has made Birch Camp 
quite perfect." 

Nor was there any discounting the fervor of 
Phil's utterance: "I say, bully for you! You 're a 
trump, all right." 

Katherine felt herself magically drawn within 
the circle of friendliness and welcome. 

"Cooks to the kitchen," ordered Mr. Ward, 
crisply. "Fred, help me fix another bed before 
supper. Or perhaps we would better set up the 
cot." 

"Not for me," interposed Katherine, swiftly. 

"No trouble at all. We keep a cot-bed among 
the stores and often set it up for visitors." 

"I really prefer to try the boughs, thank you." 

"Katherine may have my bed to-night, Father." 

"Bless you, Pat, the mattress is all cut. Now, 
then, boys, work first and talk afterward." 

"Let 's watch them," whispered Pat. 

The two girls perched on Pat's trunk while 
under their eyes, skilfully laid, the soft pile of 
green twigs grew higher. Then Fred produced 
rubber blankets and what looked to Katherine 
like an astonishing amount of bedding for the 
three unoccupied "beds," and Katherine took her 
first lesson in camp custom. The rubber blanket 
was spread down over the spruce boughs; the 
woolen blankets and "comfortables" laid on it, 
and the whole made into a shapely roll at the head. 

It was very curious, the girl thought, but she 
wondered how one would sleep. However, she had 
no attention to spare for forecasting. The im- 
mediate surroundings were too absorbing. They 
ate at a rough pine table covered with oil-cloth, 
and their napkins were of paper. They had 
wooden plates and rather heavy white cups and 
plated forks and spoons, and manners that, for 
intrinsic courtesy, Katherine had never seen bet- 
tered at her mother's table, shining with silver and 
glass. The cooks came in and ate with the family 
and took turns in jumping up to replenish empty 
dishes or to pass the water-pitcher, and their 
cookery melted in the girl's mouth. She let Mr. 



KIT PAT AND A FEW BOYS 



725 



Ward put another trout on her plate, and hoped 
that nobody remembered how many she had had 
before. 

"I actually had forgotten, Phil," said his 
mother, "how deliciously you cook trout. Many 
boys are very good cooks," Mrs. Ward explained. 
"Asarule, I think they like to cook and do it well." 

"All our boys cook," said Pat. "Does n't 
Don?" 

"I never knew him to do anything of the kind." 

"You must n't think," persisted teasing Pat, 
"that Phil makes everything taste as good as he 
does trout. When it 's our turn to cook, we al- 
ways play up our strong points. That is why we 
have such good eats in camp. Everybody makes 
what he can make best." 

Katherine wondered whether her turn would 
come with the rest, and, if so, what she could do 
with it. 

"Leave the plates," Phil remarked, when the 
meal was ended. "I '11 burn 'em. This way to 
the dish-pan." 

Everybody rose, picked up his cup, knife, fork, 
and spoon, and proceeded in single file by a wind- 
ing, fern-grown path to the lake. A boat was 
drawn up on the shore, one end in the water. 
One by one the campers ran out into the stern of 
the boat, rinsed cup and silver in the water, 
scrubbed knife and fork with a wad of grass, and 
wiped them on towels hanging from the bushes 
near. 

Unerringly Katherine followed their example. 

"Honestly, have n't you ever camped before?" 
Pat questioned, as the two took their way back up 
the trail. "You seem to know just what to do." 

Katherine wrinkled her nose, whimsically. "I 
copy just as fast as I can." 

"Really? 1 'U tell you something. We don't 
generally wash our dishes in the lake. Phil, bad 
boy, started this to see if he could get a rise out of 
you." 

"He did n't, did he?" said Katherine, demurely. 

The girls set their cups and silver on one end of 
the dining-table. 

"Our library. " Pat waved a hand at a narrow 
box of books set shelf-wise on two sapling sup- 
ports. Katherine ran over the titles — "Don 
Quixote," "Little Women," "Tom Brown's 
School-Days," "Life of John Hay," Shakespeare 
in three volumes, "Pride and Prejudice," "The 
Journal" of Maurice de Guerin, "Tales of the 
Mermaid Tavern," "The Great Hunger," "David 
Copperfield," Lamb's Essays, "The Education of 
Henry Adams," "Lorna Doone." 

"We mostly take different ones every year," 
Pat explained. "But Marian won't be separated 
from 'Little Women' and Mother always brings 

(To be 



Shakespeare. It 's grand to read 'As You Like 
It' or 'Midsummer Night's Dream' in the woods. 
We each put in the books we want to read most, 
you know, and, having so few, we really do it. 
This summer 1 am going to read 'Anthony and 
Cleopatra' and 'Henry V and 'The Life of John 
Hay.' Then, if I have time, I '11 treat myself 
again to 'Lorna Doone.' What do you want 
first?" 

"I always meant to read 'Pride and Prejudice, 
Katherine acknowledged, wondering a little at 
Pat's list and how she had come to choose it. 

"This is your chance, then. Aunt Ida put it 
in, but nobody is reading it now. We try not 
to poach on each other's book preserves. It is 
horrid to have to hide a book if you want to finish 
it without waiting. We 'd better put on our 
sweaters," Pat continued. "It will be cold soon. 
The camp-fire toasts our faces while our backs 
freeze." 

As the girls emerged from their sleeping-tent, 
Nick began closing the flaps tightly. At a little 
distance Phil and Fred were stuffing ferns into an 
old tin boiler. 

"The smudge," Pat explained. "It drives 
away the mosquitos, you know." 

"I don't know." Katherine walked over to the 
boys and the rusty boiler. "How does it drive 
them away?" 

"By acting up to its name," Fred told her. 
A dense smoke and a villainous smell were issu- 
ing from the boiler. The girl sniffed and coughed . 
"Fearfully choky." 

Phil stuffed in more ferns and, snatching up the 
boiler, darted into the first sleeping-tent, whence 
he swiftly emerged, tying the flaps behind him. 

"Lovely odor, don't you think so? Fine to 
sleep in. Gives a person jolly dreams." 

Katherine gave back to the impish black eyes 
look for look as she replied: 

"You certainly manage to make bedtime sound 
alluring." . 

"Can't make her turn a hair, can you? jeered 
Fred, as the brothers repaired to the wood-pile for 
the evening's supply of fire- wood. 

"That girl is a dead game sport," said Phil. 
"Gee, you could have knocked me over with a 
shaving when I first saw her!" 

"Me, too. Hair down her back like any kid. 
But I 'U bet you she don't think highly of this 
turn-out, just the same." 

"Huh, that 's all you know," said his brother. 
"She don't think yet. She 's just sizing us up. 
When in Rome— that 's as far as she 's got. But 
she is the quickest to get that far of any tender- 
foot I ever saw." 

Six hours later Birch Camp was very still. 

continued) 



THE MAKING OF THE FLAG 

A Patriotic Masque 

By H. B. ALEXANDER 



One of the most beautiful and appropriate ways of 
celebrating a national festival, such as the Fourth of 
July or Flag Day, is by presenting a pageant or a 
masque in which the meaning of the day shall be 
made clear through the cooperation of the talents 
and enthusiasm of a whole neighborhood. Almost 
any community or school can prepare such a cele- 
bration. There must be some one to take charge 
who can organize the committees and block out the 
performance, deciding who shall train the singers, 
who shall select the actors, who is to prepare the 
costumes, who shall supervise the staging, conduct 
the music, attend to all the little forgetable things 
that somebody must be responsible for; and there 
must be, too, a general good will, a desire to work for 
the good of all, based upon the determination that 
this particular event is to put its community upon 
the neighborhood map. Granted these two things 
initiative and spirit, the talent for a capital perfor- 
mance is bound to appear, and the folk who under- 
take the celebration will delight themselves as well 
as others with what they succeed in doing. 

It is comparatively easy to produce effects that ap- 
peal to our patriotic sentiment. For one thing the 
national symbols, the flags, the uniforms, the names 
of great Americans, the names of the States them- 
selves, are known to every one, and every one knows 
something about the events of our national history. 
In the right situation a single name is enough to 
provoke a hurrah, and when there is plenty of music, 
color, light, and motion, the public responds fluently 
to the patriotic play. It is just the occasion for mak- 
ing the meaning of America, as a country worth lov- 
ing, evident to all through symbolism and history; 
for the right use of a Fourth of July is not noise and 
jubilation, but the impression of a stronger gratitude 
to those who made the nation free and of a deeper 
determination to keep it worthy of freedom. Every 
holiday should be recognized as, in some sense, a day 
of consecration. 

The masque which is here suggested as appropri- 
ate for either the Fourth or for Flag Day is composed 
of three parts or acts. The first and last are sym- 
bolic, with singing and dancing and attractive stage 
pictures. The middle part is a dramatic scene, to be 
acted as if upon the stage. The symbolic parts may 
be varied in many ways, both as to the number of 
people participating and the manner of presentation, 
features being added or taken away at will, without 
impairing the general effect. 

For example, as given on one occasion, "The Mak- 
ing of the Flag" was made the American scene in a 
pageant devoted to all the western allies in the late 
war. A kind of history of freedom was shown, each of 
the allies depicting its own contribution to this great 
human cause. That of England was the granting of 
the Magna Charta; ours was the creation, in the Revo- 
lution, of a new nation and a new national standard; 
that of France was the French Revolution; Italy's 
was the Garibaldian struggle for a united Italy; and 
Belgium was given the place of honor as the standard- 
bearer in the world's last great effort to maintain the 
rights of men to life, liberty, and the pursuit of 
happiness. 



The performance itself may be indoors or out- 
doors, but the latter is always to be preferred in the 
summer-time if the conditions are at all favorable 
No fixed stage is needed. There should be, however' 
a level green with a background of greenery which 
is always easy to make by reinforcing clumps of 
natural bushes with cuttings brought fresh on the 
day ot the performance. Entrances may be half con- 
cealed by greenery or bunting; but it is well to bear 
in mind that audiences, especially for out-of-door 
performances, pay very little attention to how the 
performers get on or off the stage; the thing that is 
remembered is the completed picture and the signif- 
icant action that goes with it; if that is well done 
success is assured. 

For the presentation of parts requiring the sugges- 
tion of scenery, like the interior of Betsy Ross's 
house in "The Making of the Flag," a capital device 
consists in large portable screens, like great banners 
representing the wings and back-drop of a stage' 
I he screens may be made of burlap or canvas 
mounted on bamboo or other light poles, and held in 
place by boys in Colonial uniforms. The cloth should 
be painted a neutral green, to harmonize with the 
background. The wing screens may readily be 
u7u rned with an emblem in the national colors 
Vv hen the screens are in place, attendants enter with 
the few articles of furniture needed. If the per- 
formance is at night, the light will, of course, be con- 
centrated upon the improvised stage. A brief 
musical prelude should introduce the action. 

Almost without exception, the best effects are 
produced by evening performances. People are per- 
haps more in the mood for poetic appreciation at this 
time, but in any case the light is less garish and the 
illusion more effective. Of course, the evening per- 
tormance calls for skilled use of illumination, and is 
only to be made successful when there is a good man 
at the spot-light and the lantern. Another feature 
which is attractive for an evening performance is the 
use of projected pictures in place of living-pictures or 
tableaux. The effective use of lantern-slides calls 
for a lantern with a long projection and a powerful 
light; but where these can be obtained, it will be 
found that many subjects give better results in this 
fashion than in any other. This is partly due no 
doubt, to the fact that the figures can be made of 
heroic size, and out-of-doors this is a matter of im- 
portance. In this masque two such pictures are called 
for m the first part: one the well-known "Spirit of 
1 776" and the other the "Signing of the Declaration " 
Either or both of these may be given as a tableau 
but there is gain, especially for the "Signing," in the 
lantern projection; and its effect will be greatly in- 
creased if the portraits of Washington, Jefferson, 
Adams, Madison, and others are immediately after- 
ward thrown upon the screen. While pictures are 
shown, there should, of course, be music, or music 
accompanying the proper recitation. In the matter 
of recitation, it is important not to give too much 
One ought never read the whole of the Declaration 
of Independence; a few sentences or phrases is enough 
to suggest the meaning of the whole, and that is all 
that is wanted. 



726 



THE MAKING OF THE FLAG 



727 



PART T 



THE DECLARATION 

Scene : A greensward, with greenery background. 

Roll of Drums. Music of fife and drums playing 
"Yankee Doodle." The fifer and drummers enter— 
the "Spirit of 1776," symbolizing that love of liberty 
and justice in which the United States of America 
came into being as one of the world's great nations. 
Fifer and drummers pass out. 

Columbia and the Thirteen Colonies enter to 
the music of "Hail, Columbia!" played by band or 
orchestra. Led by Columbia, the Colonies group and 
separate. They are joined by an equal number of 
youths in the uniform of the Revolution. With these 
thay dance the Colonial Dances, to the music of the 
instruments. . , 

A blare of bugles announces the coming of the 
States dressed in star-adorned robes, who enter in 
groups 'and move in starry squadrons to Columbia, 
and range themselves with the Colonies and their 
attendants to form the chorus. While they are per- 
forming these evolutions, the music played should be 
a good patriotic medley. 

Signing of the Declaration of Independence. 
A screen falls and upon it is projected the picture of 
the signing of the Declaration of Independence by the 
delegates of the Colonies. As the picture is shown, 
Columbia advances and reads: 

"When in the course of human events it becomes 
necessary for one people to dissolve the political 
bands which have connected them with another, and 
to assume among the powers of the earth the separate 
and equal station to which the laws of nature and ot 
nature's God entitle them. ■ • • rT . , „ , 
"We therefore, declare: That these United Col- 
onies are and of right ought to be, Free and Inde- 
pendent States. ..." . 

[If the performance is in the daytime, this scene 
should be treated as a tableau, and Thomas Jefferson 
should be given the reading.] 

The Picture Vanishes. The Spirit ot 1770 
appears once more in the central background The 
Colonies, the Revolutionary Soldiers, the Starry 
States, surge forward and sing: 

GOD OF OUR FATHERS, WHOSE ALMIGHTY 
HAND 

(Music by George W. Warren) 

God of our fathers, whose almighty hand 
Leads forth in beauty all the starry band _ 
Of shining worlds in splendor thro' the skies, 
Our grateful songs before thy thrones arise. 

Thy love divine hath led us in the past, 

In this free land by Thee our lot is cast; 

Be Thou our ruler, guardian, guide, and stay; 

Thy word, our law; Thy paths, our chosen way. 

From war's alarms, from deadly pestilence, 
Be Thy strong arm our ever sure defense; 
Thy true religion in our hearts increase, 
Thy bounteous goodness nourish us in peace. 

Refresh Thy people on their toilsome way, 
Lead us from night to never-ending day) 
Fill all our lives with love and grace divine, 
And glory, laud, and praise be ever Thine. 

s y Daniel C. Roberts. 

or "O Beautiful for Spacious Skies," by Katherine 
Lee Bates (Music by Samuel A. Ward), beginning: 



O beautiful for spacious skies, for amber waves of 
grain, . 

For purple mountain majesties above the fruited 
plain! 

America! America! God shed His grace on thee. 
And crown thy good with brotherhood from sea to 
shining sea! 

or, "O Lord Our God, Thy Mighty Hand," by 
Henry Van Dyke (Music by Walter 0. Wil- 
kinson), beginning: 

Lord our God, Thy mighty hand hath made our 
country free; 

From all her broad and happy land may worship 
rise to Thee; 

Fulfil the promise of her youth, her liberty dejend; 
By law and order, love and truth, America befriend! 

END OF PART I 



PART II 

THE MAKING OF THE FLAG 
Characters 

Bettikins, a ten-year-old. Betsy Ross, her mother. 
General Washington. Robert Morris. Major Ross. 

Scene: The front room of the home of Betsy 
Ross, upholsteress, Philadelphia, May, 1777- A 
large window (right) overlooks the street; a door (left 
rear) to the interior of the house; another door (left 
fore) to the street. Between the two doors is a ward- 
robe, door ajar, within it the bright colors of uphol- 
sterer's stuffs. To right of inner door is a tall clock, 
and beyond this, center, is a colonial sofa, above 
which hangs the portrait of a soldier of the Revo- 
lution, a saber suspended beneath. To the right, be- 
fore the window, is Betsy Ross's work-table — sewing 
materials and stuffs upon it and a pitcher filled with 
poppies. At the extreme right is a long mirror. Two 
or three chairs of plain pattern complete the furni- 
ture. Over one of the chairs hangs a piece of uphol- 
stering cloth upon which the arms of Washington — 
the stars and bands— has been appliqued. On the 
bare floor are scraps of cloth and thread- waste. The 
time is morning, and the sunlight streams in through 
the window on the poppies. 

(The tall clock strikes eight, as the curtain rises. The 
door from within, left rear, is pushed slowly open, and 
the bright, inquisitive face of Mistress Bettikins peers 
from behind it. After a second's hesitation, she enters.) 

Bettikins (curtsying to the clock). Good morrow, 
Gran'sire Clock! (Retreating slightly, with a wave of 
the hand and another curtsy:) Good morrow! (She 
turns gaily toward the window and the sun-brightened 
poppies.) Good morrow, Flowers! Good morrow, 
Day! Good morrow, you, Sir Sun ! (She turns to the 
portrait above the sofa and blows a kiss:) And good 
morrow to my dear, dear soldier father, gone so long, 
so long to the cruel war! Ah, when wilt thou come 
again to Mumsy and thy little Bettikins? 'T will be 
many a day and many a day, our Mumsy says,— 
and she weepeth saying it— for our good General 
Washington hath need of thee. But oh, Father mine, 
the day will be a merry one when thou 'rt come again ! 
(She faces about and catches a glimpse of her own re- 
flection in the tall mirror. She greets it with an arch 
gesture; then saucily curtsies and playfully postures 
before it, all with a childish affectation.) Good mor- 
row and fair day, sweet Mistress Ross! . Thou rt 



728 



early come a-callmg. {Earnestly.) But oh wilt 
hou not be early when thy dear father is come from 
the wars! And make thyself fine, fine! (Seted wMi 

SitoF^i^^f'S"^"* the result in 

arms ) 8 S ™ g ' keeping time with bod V <™d 

Yankee Doodle rode to town 
Upon a little pony, 

hair.) 6 takeS ° m nf P ° PpieS and thmsts U *» her 
Stuck a feather in his cap, 

,„ . , And called him macaroni! 
{Dancing.) 

Yankee Doodle, doodle, do, 
Yankee Doodle dandy — ' 

^vXutf^i enh andthrows ™& the gay mantle.) 
EST' k be n0 gay mac aroni until my soldier 

ather be come agam and Mumsy weepeth no mo re 
(She goes to the wardrobe and, taking a piece of blur 

r:trZ S l h T b Ti' r i ' Tis b e«er! I shall be 
rather the Lady of the Stars, which are the fair 

flT^l ° f th6 , m f hat slee P afield " (She takes from 
the table her mother's yardstick, which she holds aloft 
I ke a wand ) And this shall be my staff of magic 
wherewith to light them-all the fair stars of heTven 

She" oTe^ ! "*« the ^ 
(Bettikins stands with her staff upraised. The door 
from wtihm opens wider, and Betsy Ross appear 

^ mm ' den ' Wh ° ***** 

Betsy. And who is this Lady o' the Blue in 
Betsy Ross's parlor? e ' 1,1 

Bettikins (half startled). Oh, Mumsy! (Recov- 
ering her posture.) To-day I am the Fairy CeVug 
hou hast old me of This is my robe of blue like' 
the blue blue sky. And this is my wand, wherewith 
I light the lanterns of the stars each night to shine 
while men do sleep But oh, Mumsy, there should be 

M B ^ S 7 & tcMn S U P Bettikins and kissing her) 
Methmks t is no great trick. I '11 show thee maiden 
mine. And then Cerulea will be quite compTete - 
and may her good star bless her always I 

(She seats herself beside the table, Bettikins at her 

white silk This she folds, once and twice and five 
times each fold after the first making the angle of the 
pom of a star-) See 't is so it must be done-a fo d 
first m the middle; then here where is our star's first 
point and so for the others, each in order. And then 

(She tal tbU n thl l htUe W6 / ge ° f cl °th-and then- 
(She takes the shears and cuts through the folded 
cloth.) _ Lo m one simple stroke thou hast a fair 

swee? one? ^ " ^ Wand ' is '* "°" 
Bettikins (delightedly). Oh, thou magic Mumsy I 

JrTFn^'^T th€ star 10 the end of ^ yard- 
I clSf/ nmg t Ul J k f P ° mts: while Bettikiks holds up 
the cloth from which the star has been cut ) 

Bettikins. And oh, Mumsy, in the cloth is left 

a fairy window ^ 

five points hath its meaning and its lesson. Whereof 
the first point, which is this one, like a right hand to 
all, is the image of Justice. And this, which come I 



THE MAKING OF THE FLAG 



named Loyalty, whiSSL^^gJ^J 

arrnTh f Ul T°u alI u that is ri % ht and faT And the 
arm that reacheth above, and is the shield arm of a 
warrior, ,s the protecting arm of Faith And that 
which 1S above and is the peak and head of all point 
ng upright to the zenith, is the token of Hope, which 
s the true illumination of every star. Such is the 
lesson of thy wand, my bright Cerulea 

bettikins (taking the wand reverently) Dearest 
Mumsy, doth my star indeed mean all that" Tnd 

ctrs "lotZxt^ d ° a '[ th ° Se *at be'sot 
aiers ot General Washington, when thev lie afield 
omghts through all the heavens see bright flames of 
hope, which are the shining stars? 

Betsy (bravely sad). Yea, daughter; on all that 
0^^ °' er n many that beneathth 
Sht'of hopf dfernetr^ ^ f0r ^ 
tur B esf T1 hZ S {telli ^ over the Points with delicate ges- 
Z Ihll ' r h ' ch 18 llke a lifted arm : and Cour- 
pfhh A V S r a foot r ste PPed out; and Loyalty and 
Faith and Hope. Indeed, Mother, 't is like good 
Christian in the "Pilgrim's Progressed hath t 

one a ik"e e th n e ng °1L f-' a " d h ° ldin S a11 the P^S in 

Betsv T T ^ at 't armed with ? ood ™? 
-forth V* dau g, hter - th ere is such a meaning 

-for the name of the whole star is Liberty. Without 

UvdtvanVro ° tHer V !lr ,eS die a ^y-Faith and 
Hone las of , M^T and J llstlre - and Hope dies too, 
nop last of all when Liberty is taken away 

nnw J KINS upholding the wand). Oh, Mumsy 
now know why my dear soldier father is VonT to 
Sl tLtt^ Washi "g to "- ^ is for Libert and 
God i es (%\ : arS m f Shining "P vonder . ^'here 
\kv If / ( f g0CS ° ,ke Wmdow < Poking to the 
sky. As she does so, her eye catches sight of some- 
thing, n the street.) Oh, Mumsy! It is General w2h 
mgton! Here in our street! And dear Uncle 
ou^i htt- 11 ' tHey - coming 

^ceTth^^r? gen<?ral "° ™« tha'n 
r\Mce in thy life! (.She turns exc tedh to the mirror 

S) Hi "It ^ Cap - TheZZ'r 

trgen t ,e"en. thee f ° d °° r ' t hild ' and 'adniit 
(Bettikins goes to the door, left fore, while Betsy 
continues before the mirror. She turns to greet Vr 
guests as Robert Morris, clothed as a coloniZlgentZ 
man, enters with Washington, in uniform ) g 

Morris (robustly). Good morrow to thee Betsv 
I bring a guest whose face all know. General Wash ' 
mgton, 't is Mistress Betsy Ross. 

(Betsy curtsies, and Washington gravely 'bows ) 
Washington I am pleased, indeed, to greet 
fend Morris's fnend-and the widow of a vaint 

honoT' ' YC We ' COme 10 my nouse ' Ye d « me 

Washington. I trust the hour is not against us 
r is early, but our affair is early gainst us. 

Morris. R est you as to that, General. Mistress 

mg to Bettikins, whom he roundly kisses) she hath 
here a bluebird to waken her! Miss Bettikfns thou 
shouldst know the great general. 

. (Bettikins curtsies gravely to Washington who smil- 
ing, takes her hand and kisses it in courtly fashion') 




72Q 



730 



THE MAKING OF THE FLAG 



hwf H :w T °, N - A S ^l dier ' S d ^shter in the soldier's 
blue (with feehng). Ah, I know well, well, thou 'rt 
precious to thy mother. 

Bettikins {with childish dignity). 1 am the fairy 
Lerulea; and every night, with my wand, I light the 
stars that shine fair and bright on all the fields where 
soldiers he. My father is a soldier 

Washington. A fairy, in sooth, thou art Yes 
yes t is just such fairies that do light the stars that 
brighten soldiers' nights— the blessedest of fairies' 

Betsy {offering chairs). Prithee, be seated, General. 

{Washington seats himself, Bettikins drawing near 
his chair. Morns approaches the table, where Betsy 
takes up the piece worked with the Washington arms to 
show him. He dons his spectacles and examines it.) 

Betsy {to Morris). T is ready for the chair, just 
as you did command, if so be it suit. 

Morris {admiringly). What think you, General— 
the stars and bars of the arms of Washington for the 
council chair. Is 't not a fair piece of work and 
worthy the skill of Mistress Ross? Nay Betsy I 
never saw any better work. 

Washington. And I never saw the mullets bet- 
ter done, out of England or the Continent. You do 
me honor, Mistress Ross. 

Betsy {curtsying, with obvious pleasure). Which 
every American must ever do— with the best that is 
m him. I do but give my best 

Morris. Ah, General, I told you Betsy Ross is 
the very woman lor our need. Betsy, 't is another 
business we come upon to-day— more in meaning 
than even the working of our general's heraldry 
(He adjusts his glasses, pulls a paper from his pocket 
and steps forward.) The Colonies are now the United 
States of America— as our great Declaration and the 
Liberty Bell proclaimed, nigh a year ago. Such a 
nation as we now are must have a flag, symbolizing 
its union and its parts, thirteen States in one. Here 
(he hands a sketch to Betsy) is its design, drawn by the 
very hand of our general. And here is the descrip- 
tion, in the resolution made to be presented to Con- 
gress. (He reads.) "That the flag of the thirteen 
united States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and 
white; and that the union be thirteen stars, white, in 
blue field, representing a new constellation." So it 
reads, Betsy, and so lies the plan. 'T is you must 
make the flag, a task, I believe, that will cause your 
name to be honored in our country as long as this 
banner shall float above it. 

Betsy (who has been studying tlie design). Nay I 
have never made a flag. I don't know whether I can- 
but I 'II try. 

Washington (smiling). And with that spirit and 
with such skill as we have seen, we doubt not the 
outcome. 

M orris. Not a bit, not a bit ! Trust Betsy for it 

Bettikins. Oh, Mumsy can make anvthing— 
justaseasy! And I '11 help, too! 

Washington. Indeed thou wilt, by thy very 
smiling presence. Cerulea shall be the fairy god- 
mother of the flag— heaven-blest in her blue. 

Betsy (at the wardrobe, drawing forth a piece of red 
and white banded cloth). Here is a piece of stripe that 
should make the foundation. (She throws it over the 
back of the sofa, which she wheels out from the wall so 
arranging the cloth that it shows the thirteen stripe's of 
the flag. Morris stands at one side, adjusting his glasses 
to observe. Washington moves his chair to see to better 
advantage. The sofa is thus the center of the picture. 
Betsy drapes a piece of blue for the field. ) 



[June 

Betsy. T is thus the union should lie (she glances 
at the diagram), breaking the stripes, seven of the 
short and six of the long. {She pins on the blue ) 

Bettikins (running to the table, whence she picks 
up the piece of silk from which the star has been cut) 
And I know how the stars must be cut, all in one 
stroke! (She returns to where Washington is seated 
folding the cloth to show him. Betsy meantime is deftly 
cutting stars from the white cloth arid pinning them in a 
circle on the blue field, Morris watching her ) 'T is 
folded so, and so, and so; and then 't is cut here and 
the star falls out and leaves a star's window— see' 
(She opens the cloth, showing the star-shaped hole- then 
lays this on Washington's knee.) And I know the 
meaning of the star, too, and of all its points! 

Washington (smiling down at her). Who should 
know it better than the fairy Cerulea? And what is 
the meaning? 

Bettikins. This is the arm of Justice, and these 
two, which are like feet, are Courage and Loyally 
and the other arm is Faith, and the head is Hope' 
looking upward. (She looks up into Washington's 
face.) And the whole star is a soldier, like my father 
and it means Liberty. 

Washington (thoughtfully). Aye, child, it means 
Liberty — and sacrifice for Liberty. 

Bettikins (indicating the portrait). That is my 
soldier father, in the picture up there. Oh, Mumsy 
the flag is all done! Stars and Stripes and a blue sky 
lor the stars to shine in! Oh, it is beautiful! (She 
runs to her mother, who stands back awaiting the judg- 
ment of her guests.) 

Morris. There it is, General; done in a trice. 
And who can vie with our Betsy Ross? 

Washington (rising). Aye, it is a flag to move 
men s hearts. Its stars are indeed a new constella- 
tion, a very crown of heaven, shining at the zenith 
of Hope. Its bars are the staves of a new song, musi- 
cal with the cheers which brave men give when they 
make of their bodies the bulwark of their country's 
right. Under the folds of this flag America will fight 
her way to freedom, and under its folds, in good time 
Cod willing, she will fight for and win the freedom of 
other men in other lands, so long as tyrants rise to 
curse this world. (He turns toward Betsy, with Betti- 
kins beside her, changing in manner from the austere 
to the gentle.) But best of all, I like the poetry this 
little maid hath put into the meaning of the' flag. 
She is, in truth, the fairy godmother of her country's 
standard, lighting its stars with Faith and Hope and 
making them to shine for Freedom. (He advances 
toward Betsy and takes her 'hand.) Nor to you, 
Mistress Ross, can I deny a slender ray of this bright 
hope — even though its disappointment must make 
your grief more bitter. Major Ross is long reported 
among the lost — even among the identified and 
buried. But mistakes occur. There had seemed to 
be no doubt; but yesterday word came of the at- 
tempted escape of a prisoner in the hands of the 
enemy, apparently an officer, of the name of Ross. 
It is uncertain rumor; but (indicating the flag) — 
the stars bid us hope. 

Betsy (bravely). He gave himself, General, freely, 
and I him freely gave— for freedom. But, oh, I have 
never denied myself the right to hope.'— I and my 
Bettikins! (She clasps Bettikins. Morris wipes his 
glasses. Washington turns meditatively. The moment's 
silence is broken by the sound of rapid hoof-beats draw- 
ing near, and slowing abruptly as they approach. 
Bettikins breaks from her mother and runs to the 
window.) 

Bettikins. Oh, Mumsy! It is a soldier! It is 



THE MAKING OF THE FLAG 



731 



my soldier father! (The door opens violently, and a 
soldier in tattered buff and blue enters.) 

Washington (advancing and seizing his ham). 
Major Ross! 

Ross. General! (Then seizing Betsy and Betkkms 
in one embrace.) Betsy! Bettikins! Free at last! 
Home at last ! 

(Washington raises his hand in military salute. A 
great American flag is lowered taking the place of the 
usual curtain to the scene. The orchestra strikes up 
" The Star-spangled Banner!") 

END OF PART II 

There is a word that should be said about the use of 
history' in masques and pageants. It is seldom pos- 
sible to follow the historic events precisely as they 
are recorded. It is necessary to modify them so as to 
give a good picture or a telling drama. For example, 
in "The Making of the Flag," the officer kinsman of 
Betsy Ross is represented as her husband returned 
from captivity after he had been thought dead, 
whereas tradition tells us that Betsy Ross was really 
a widow. Of course, too, there is a kind of anachron- 
ism in representing the making of the flag imme- 
diately after the signing of the Declaration, for the 
former event came in May, 1777, nearly a year after 
the latter. These things, however, are not real per- 
versions of what is historically significant. The flag 
was a natural consequence of the Declaration, and it 
is the spirit of Betsy Ross that is the thing we wish 
impressed upon our imaginations. Wherever his- 
tory is memorable, it is because of some inner and 
lasting meaning of the event, and it is just for the 
sake of the meaning, as we have said, that celebra- 
tions are observed. 



PART 111 

OLD GLORY 

Scene: A greensward, with greenery background. 
Musical Prelude, to which there enters the 
Chorus — Youths in uniform, Maidens in the symbolic 
costumes of the States. They sing: 

Onward, comrades! Onward, brothers! 

Onward, men, who own the name! 
Kindle ye the fires of freedom 

That your sons may guard the flame! 

Strike the tinder! Touch the faggot! 

Let the blaze be tempest-fanned, 
Till the wonder-light upleaping 

Shine in splendor o'er the land! 

Lord of Battles! King, Redeemer! 

Master of the lives of men! 
Lift the banners of the righteous 

That thy Law prevail again! 

Thou command them! Thou sustain them! 

Through the years that are to be, 
Till as glass their souls be molten 

In the love of liberty! 

Flag Dance. Streams of youthful dancers enter, 
each alternate stream in red or white, interweaving 
in figures suggestive of rippling stripes. They part, 
and from the center there enters the blue — children 
in fluffy blue dresses, large bows of white indicating 
the stars. In the semicircle formed by the bands of 
red and white, they dance their star dance. Then, 
to graver music, all form in a tableau, the Flag. 



THE end 



HOW TO MAKE THE FIVE-POINTED STAR 



Take a square piece of paper or cloth and fold it in 
half; then fold it again so that it will resemble Fig. I. 
Fold it again on the dotted line so that, when 
folded, it will be as in Fig. II. Fold it over once 
more, again on the dotted line; when it should have 
the shape of Fig. III. Then cut it as shown in the 
dotted line in Fig. Ill, and you will have a symmet- 
rical five-pointed star. 

Betsy Ross's little house is standing to-day. 
Everything around it has changed — even the name 
of the street itself is different. Tall, five-story 



buildings look down on both sides upon the little 
two-storied structure, with its shingled roof and 
dormer-window, which is now cared for by the 
American-Flag House and Betsy Ross Memorial 
Association. The front room is used for the sale of 
small flags and other souvenirs, the proceeds of 
which are devoted to the work of the Association, and 
the room back of this, in which the first flag was 
made, has been restored to the general appearance 
it must have presented during the lifetime of Betsy 
Ross. 




FIG. I 




FIG. Ill 



CLOTHES 

By JANE BROWN 



Peggy says that, when she 's grown, 
She 'II have a dress, her very own, 
Like thistle-down; and every night 
Will dance with feet so fairy light. 
All the boys will like her, too. 
That is what Peg says she '11 do. 

Kath'rine says her first ball-gown 

W ill be the prettiest in town. 

She '11 choose her colors from the sky 

W hen the sun 's about to die; 

Dainty pink and palest blue, 

Rose and green and purple, too. 

\\ hen I am old and have my way, 
I '11 have no colors of the day, 
But a dress of thin gold light, 
Like the moon we saw last night ; 
Pile my hair up on my head 
Grandly— They '11 forget it 's red. 

Mine 's the finest gown, you '11 see; 
And a prince will come for me. 




SOME HINTS FOR CAMPERS 



By S. LEONARD BAST IN 



A TENT OF NEWSPAPER 

It is possible to make quite a useful little- tent 
out of newspapers. Secure a pole that is six or 
seven feet long; a piece of bamboo will do well. 
Near the upper part of this, wrap several thick- 




nesses of stout twine. Then from this part run 
lengths of twine. These should be carried out in 
tent fashion, and at the end they are fixed to 
wooden pegs driven into the ground. In all, 
there might be eight or ten of these lengths. Cut 
the newspapers into pieces of 
a suitable size, and with paste, 
fasten them over the twine. 
One border of the paper should 
be turned round the twine, 
the edge of the next bit being 
stuck just over the part that 
is turned round. An open 
space should be left to act as 
a doorway to the tent. To 
make the paper waterproof, 
go over it with a brush dipped 
in linseed-oil. The paper 
will then stand quite a fair 
amount of rain. 

It is easy to gather up the tent by taking out 
the central pole and loosening the pegs. The 
paper then falls around the pole, something like a 
giant umbrella, and it is easily set up again. 

WATERPROOF MATCHES 

One of the commonest experiences of the camper 
is that of finding that the matches are so damp 
that they will not strike. All this trouble may 
be avoided by providing oneself with waterproof 
matches. These are easily made in the following 



way. Melt a few lumps of candle-wax in an old 
can on the stove. Allow this to cool a little and 
then, before it has set, dip the matches in, one at 
a time. Treat the heads and about half of the 
wooden part. Place the matches on one side to 
cool. Matches treated in this simple manner 
have been soaked in water for many hours, and 
they have ignited as readily as those which were 
perfectly dry. The only difference is that, in 
striking, it is needful to do so a trifle more firmly 
so as to get through the thin film of wax surround- 
ing the head. When once the flame starts, the 
match burns very readily, owing to the wax 
which had adhered to the wood. Any ordinary 
matches can be treated in the manner described. 

MAKING A FIRE OF SMALL STUFF 

Now and again, when camping out, it is not 
possible to get a sufficiency of large pieces of wood 
to make a good fire. An excellent plan, by means 
of which a fine fire may be made out of small 
brushwood or even leaves, is shown in the pictures. 

In the first place, a stout upright is driven a 
little way into the ground. This might be four 
or five feet in height. At the base of this is 
placed a similar piece of wood, lying in a horizon- 




tal position along the ground, see figure I. Then 
start to pile up the stuff for the fire around the 
stakes in the manner indicated in figure 2. Take 
special care to press the material down well, as 
the closer it is packed, the longer the fire will last 
and the better it will be. When the heap is 
completed, both stakes are carefully pulled out. 
There will then be an air passage right through 
the heart of the mass. 

To set the fire going, it is only needful to place 
some lighted paper, or any dry material, at the 
lower opening. At once the flames start to roar 



733 



734 



SOME HINTS FOR CAMPERS 



up through it in a vigorous style, and the fire 
gradually spreads until the whole mass is glowing 
red with heat. 

A STOVE FOR THE TENT 

When the weather is bad, campers often find 
that the tent is none too warm. This is especially 
the case at night. Here is a good way of heating 
a tent which is well worth following. Open up in 
the ground a hole which is slightly less in diame- 
ter than an old metal pail which will be used to 




A STOVE FOR THK TENT 



fit over the top. Let the hole go down to the 
depth of about two feet. At the end of the day, 
gather all the glowing embers from the camp-fire 
and put them into this hole that has been made, 
pressing down well. Then invert the pail and 
place it over the hole. A few sods of earth placed 
round the part where the pail rests on the ground 
will keep in all smoke and fumes. In a few mo- 
ments the bucket will start to radiate heat, and this 
will be maintained for many hours. The next 
night the hole may be cleared out and filled up 
again with glowing material. 

A CAMPING-STOVE 

If you want a good stove for your camp, this is 
easy to make with simple materials. First get a 
barrel or a box that will stand three or four feet 
in height. In the bottom of this cut an opening 
about a foot wide, and a little more than this from 
top to bottom. At the upper part of the barrel 
make a hole, into which a chimney is to be fixed. 
This chimney could be made out of a piece of 
sheet-iron bent round, or even a number of tomato- 
cans would do. These can be fitted together if 
the tops and bottoms are melted away on a fire. 



[June 

To make one fit into the other, open out each tin 
a little at the lower part with a pair of pliers. 

W hen you have your barrel or box set up, you 
should plaster it all oxer with clay. If you can- 
not get good clay, mix earth with water or use 
mud from the river bottom. In any case, cover 
the box completely with the substance, putting it 
on eight or ten inches thick all oxer. When the 
whole surface is covered, light a fire of drv stuff in 
the box. Make a good blaze and keep this going 
for some hours. Of course, quite soon the barrel 
or box burns away, and the fierce heat then bakes 
the clay or mud into a hard 
coating. Your stove will 
, then be finished and you will 

i|J find it extremely useful. 

You can toast anything at 
the opening, and it is a fine 
place to cook fish or similar 
food. On a cool evening it 
is pleasant to sit around the 
stove, as it gives out a great 
deal of heat. 

MAKING A FIRE 
OUTDOORS 

It is not always easy to get a 
fire to burn well in the open, 
especially if there is a strong 
wind blowing. Under such 
conditions it is a good plan 
to build ui> a special fireplace such as you see in 
the sketch. Cut some sods of earth and pile these 
on the top of each other at the back and on either 
side of a space which is just about the width of 
your pan or kettle. W hen you have built up to the 
height of about a foot, or a little more, place two 
or three bars of iron from side to side across the 
top opening. It always pays to take these bars with 
you when you are camping out. Add one more 
sod all around, and your fireplace is readv for use. 

Gather together the material for the fire and 
put it in the opening, then place the kettle or the 



CAMPING-STOVE 




A GOOD FIREPLACE FOR A WINDY DAY 

pan in position, and set a match to the stuff. 
Soon you will have a splendid little fire going that 
w ill roar away no matter how windy the position 
may be. If you want to make the fire extra 



19-211 

strong, hold a piece of board, or even newspaper 
in front of the opening, so that it is nearly covered, 
save for a little crack at the bottom. The draught 
you will then get is tremendous, and you can 
soon have a fire that is almost as hot as a black- 
smith's. These little fires are splendid for roast- 
ing potatoes, and indeed for cooking almost any- 
thing that you would be likely to have on a 
picnic. If you cannot get sods of earth, you can 
make use of stones in very much the same way. 

A CAMP BAROMETER 

A handy little weather-teller, which may be 
taken into camp, is made in the following way. 
Get a glass jar with a tight-fitting cork. Then 
obtain a test-tube which is about the same length 

the 
1 tit 



SOME HINTS FOR CAMPERS 



735 




as the height of the jar. In the center of 
cork make a hole in which the test-tube wi 
upside down. Color some water 
by adding red ink, and almost 
fill the jar. Then fill the tube 
to about a third of its capacity. 
Now insert the open end of the 
tube in the water in the jar 
without the admission of any 
air. This can be done by hold- 
ing the finger over the tube and 
not taking it away until the end 
is immersed. Bore a few holes 
in the cork, and the barometer 
is complete. 

The atmosphere pressing on 
the water in the jar will affect 
the height of the fluid in the tube. When the air 
is dry and heavy, the water in the tube mounts 
upward; if it is moist and light, the opposite 
happens. In the first case, fine weather is to be 
expected; in the latter instance, unsettled condi- 
tions are to be looked for: To see the position ol 
the fluid in the tube from day to day, an india- 
rubber ring may be employed. If this is not 
available, a piece of cotton could be tied round 
the glass tube to mark the level of the barometer 
from time to time. 

This home-made weather-teller will be found to 
be very reliable. It is only needful to keep it in 
an upright position to have it in good working 
order. If at any time the water should be spilled, 
the jar can be refilled with plain water. The 
coloring of the liquid is only to make it more easy 
to observe the level of the fluid. 

AN EMERGENCY DARK-ROOM 

Have you ever been outdoors and wanted to 
change your plates, or something has gone wrong 
inside the camera and you have felt that you 



would give almost anything to be able to use a 
dark-room? Yet there may not be a house within 
many miles. If you have an overcoat or a rain- 
coat, there is no need to worry, for by following 
this plan, you can with safety do almost anything 
you find necessary. Sit down on the ground and 
spread the coat, outside up, over your legs. Tuck 
the borders of the coat under the legs at the sides 
and also beneath the feet. Put the camera or 
the dark slide under the coat, about as far down 
as the knees. Then insert the hands in the outer 
ends of the sleeves and push them inward. 
Tuck the collar end of the coat about the middle 
of the body, and bend slightly forward, so as to 
exclude all the light. You will then find that you 
can carry on an)' operations you wish in perfect 
safety. Of course, the whole thing must be done 
by touch, but a photographer soon grows clever 
with his fingers. He knows by the "feel" which 
is the side of the plate bearing the emulsion. As 
well, too, he is familiar with the workings of the 
inside of his camera, and can usually right mat- 
ters without actually using his eyes. At am- 
i-ate the plan mentioned above is worth trying 
when a sudden emergency arises. 

KEEPING INSECTS FROM THE 
PICNIC BASKET 

When baskets containing food are placed on 
the ground, all kinds of creeping insects soon 
make their way to the eatables. By using a sim- 
ple device, this trouble may be entirely prevented. 

Get a tin can that 
is not less than two 
inches deep. The 
lower part of an 
empty salmon or 
fruit can would do 
very well. In the 
bottom of this bore 
a hole through 
which a long piece 
of wire is thrust. 
This wire is fixed 
into place and the 
can made water 
tight by applying a 
little solder w r here 
it enters the hole. 
Bend the wire at 
both ends into the 
form of hooks. Fill the can with water and hang 
the device from the branch of a tree as shown in 
the picture. Attach the food basket to the lower 
hook. No creeping insects of any kind can reach 
the inside of the basket, which is perfectly pro- 
tected by the barrier of water in the can. 




A WELL PROTECTED BASKET 



THE LUCK OF DENEWOOD 

By EMILIE BENSON KNIPE and ALDEN ARTHUR KNIPE 

Authors of "The Lucky Sixpence," ■■Beatrice of Denewood," "Vive la France!" etc. 

SYNOPSIS OF THE PREVIOUS INSTALMENTS 

i E £?S7dti*t^ seeks ~:\^^ ?T ntown - ?■* *** « - 

saying that a relative of the family, a French rirl named Satric Z s' S"**"*' a " ° mcer with the A - E - 

and he has thought it best to send her to SSSr^^tSSSJE!!^ ^ ^ ** aMi8tance ' 
in an aeroplane flight over the lines, has disappeared and is P Soul ange, an officer in the French army, 

Denewood, is talking this news over with her cousfn Be tv Powelf ' when fi^F ? ^ ^ aUnt * the '° dge at 
girl of their own age, deeply interested in the Denewood book! nXhlh story 5 Xt ho T^fl 
see the lucky slX pence, their family talisman, and when she is told th Tit h* Th. i ! t Cr firSt deslre is to 

at the girls' indifference and declares her belief that with it was £? 5 f t rf ^ a ? ntUly She is ast °"nded 
their whole-hearted hospitality, she determines to find he , J Denewood. Full of gratitude for 

plans to hunt for it, and to that end ^an^rimi h P ^ 3nd reSt ° re the luck of the house - Beatrice 

called. On her admission to The ' S^SS^ S^S ^ f ^ 00 ' " DeneWO ° d is 

and thinking it a waste of time forbids day-schoS to lo abov th. fi Tfl ^ • ^'^ Maple discovering this 
excited by a letter from jack asking for a d^^of^f&S^e^n^ , ^ Peg is Vastl >' 

lest unauthorized news of her brother rouse false hopes sS?v aft^ a ^ V° Stand gU3rd ° Ver B ^ 

Captain Badger of the British Army, calls, saying that he 'has news of 1 on f r FT t announces him «elf as 
With Jack's letter in her mind, Peg refuses to let him see R, Th °\ L . ouls D whlch he will give to no one but Be. 
return to the lodge. He mistakes fa£faS£5 Peg ^suades her Z or£ to otf ^ I 1 ™™™ ' «*» ** 
her cousin and, seated outside the spring-house near \vha t he has to Z Z Z "^1°' L ° Uis ' t0 im P^sonate 
out what the stranger proposed. The two giris earn hat Ca D ta n Bad " ^ '"^ COU ' d als ° find 

francs to ransom Louis de Soulange whom ife de, L rf 7 k S f g , m S6arch 0t three h ""dred thousand 
Be can supply this money from bidden stlX t«yt^B6 insTs^" ^ ■ aSSUm6S that 
tion. He finally gives her till the next dav and PeTtri t ' u \t S ' , S Up ° n havlng tlme tor considera- 
ignorant of this crisis in her ^T^S^fto ^^^^S 1 7 * ^ ^ * is UL Meanwhile. Be, 
believes may be there. She unexpected" scover^ ; It and S ^ l ° a S6Cret P assage she 

examines the passage and finds itXted by Ts m^^T^^S"^^ * * 

tries to reenter the spring-house, but the trap-door refuses to open. ' retrac,n 8 her ste P* she 



CHAPTER XVII 

MISS HITTY GORGAS 

It was for a moment only that despair took pos- 
session of Beatrice when she found herself trapped 
in the passage under the spring-house. 

"There mus' be some way out," she said to 
herself, and lifted her head bravely. 

She was not the sort of a girl to become panic- 
stricken and so to lose her wits as to be helpless. 
Her experiences during the grim days of the con- 
flict in France had made her self-reliant. On 
many occasions she had been the one person in the 
old chateau who had remained calm when rumors 
of the approach of the Germans threatened to 
demoralize the entire household. Not until the 
walls had begun to tumble about their ears under 
a vicious bombardment, did Beatrice lose control 
of those about her. Four years of war had 
strengthened in her the courage traditional in the 
Soulange family, and the circumstances of her 
present position served to stimulate her into 
quickly setting about the task of freeing herself. 

"There mus' be some way out," she repeated, 
more positively than before, and once again 
pushed vainly on the little door above her head. 
Then she collected herself and tried to reason out 
a possible explanation of her predicament. How 



could it be that the trap, which opened so easily', 
from above, seemed absolutely immovable from 
below? 

"There mus* be a secret lock," she concluded, 
and with this thought in mind, she passed her 
hand over the under surface of the flooring, but 
her fingers could not even find the cracks in the 
masonry where the square block of stone fitted 
into the opening. 

"If I am to get out; it mus' be at the other 
end," she murmured, and scrambled down to the 
bottom of the passage. 

She made her way back through the tunnel, 
climbed the narrow stair, and stood once more 
before the shadowy barrier. With all her strength 
she pressed against the heavy planking, but it 
resisted her utmost efforts. Satisfied that noth- 
ing could be gained by this method, she again 
sought a handle which she might turn; but as 
before, her fingers found nothing of the sort, and 
fear crept into her heart as the conviction grew 
that this was not a door, but a stout partition. 

For a moment or two Be was near to giving up; 
but with a determined shake of her head, she 
repeated to herself the words that had given her 
courage before. 

"There mus' be some way out," she murmured, 
and again set herself to finding a means of escape! 



736 



THE LUCK OF DENEWOOD 



737 



High above her, and quite beyond reach, was 
a narrow slit in the masonry, which admitted a 
pale, uncertain light. Beatrice looked up at it, 
but could see no hope in that direction. It might 
serve as a vent to the sound of her voice if she 
called for help; but the girl, as yet, had no inten- 
tion of seeking aid and by so doing betray the 
secret of the passage. 

"I shall 'ave to be very hungry before I shout," 
she told herself determinedly. 

Her thoughts turned back to the square trap 
leading into the spring-house, and she made a 
half-involuntary movement as if to go back 
there to try once more to open it; but although 
she felt sure that a means had been provided for 
an exit at that point, she was certain that, without 
a light, her efforts would be futile. 

This led her to a speculation as to why the 
passage had been built at all. Of course, there 
had been a purpose behind its construction. It 
was not meant as a place for children to play in 
nor an interesting and mysterious tunnel used 
only to surprise people. Probably it had been 
planned originally as a means of sending a mes- 
senger to secure assistance in case the house was 
attacked by Indians. 

But an enemy having discovered the entrance 
through the spring-house, it became necessary to 
put up a barrier in the passageway itself. Yet it 
was equally necessary that a friend should have 
a clear road into the house, or the tunnel would be 
of little service. 

So arguing to herself, Beatrice arrived at the 
conclusion that a means of getting through the 
solid planking must exist, and she tried to re- 
member all she had read of the passage in the 
Dene wood books. 

"My great ancestress called it the 'Mouse's 
Hole' " she said half aloud, then chuckled softly 
to herself as a new idea entered her mind : it was 
a little toad that had showed her the way in; 
perhaps a mouse would show her the way out. 

"If I sit very still, per'aps one will come," she 
thought, but after a few moments of silence she 
grew restless. "What should I do if I were a 
mouse?" she asked herself, and then answered her 
own question: "I should find a crack under the 
door." 

She knelt and felt along the bottom of the 
planking. Yes, there was an inch or more of 
space between it and the top step. "But I am 
too big a mouse to get out there," she told her- 
self; yet at that moment she made a discovery. 

This top step was considerably wider than the 
others and, instead of being stone, was wood. 

"Now why is that?" Beatrice asked herself, 
realizing that here was a significant fact that 
encouraged investigation. 



Eagerly she felt along the edge just underneath 
the barrier, and presently her fingers came in 
contact with what, after a moment or two, she 
concluded must be hinges. For an instant she 
was puzzled, then with a cry of surprise and 
delight, she seized the front of the step and pulled 
upward. With astonishing ease it lifted and, 
like the lid of a box, folded back against the heavy 
planking that barred her way. 

"Ah, now per'aps the hole is big enough for 
such a mouse as I," Beatrice said excitedly, and 
started to crawl under. 

But, to her surprise, she found another step 
leading down and, after that, still another, so that, 
by bending a little, she was able to pass beneath 
the heavy planks; and in a pace or two she again 
found stone steps going up. 

"Had I not thought of what a mouse would do, 
I should still be trapped," Beatrice murmured as 
she looked ahead, where she was relieved to find 
that there was more light. And, with a feeling 
that her path was now clear, she hurried on 
rapidly, conscious that she was safely inside the 
walls of the big house and ascending to the second 
floor. 

Again the passage grew dark, and presently she 
stood on a level space. In front of her was a 
wall of blackness, and she stopped, putting forth 
her hands before she took a hesitating step. Then 
suddenly she halted abruptly, for, with extraor- 
dinary clearness, the sound of girls' voices came 
to her. 

"My dear, I did n't have your algebra," one 
said ; and another answered rather pettishly, "Well, 
somebody has it!" 

"It 's probably downstairs in the study," the 
first girl replied. "Come on. The dormitory is 
no place for your books anyhow, my child." 

Beatrice heard the girls go out of the room, and 
then all was silent again. 

"I am behind that fireplace," she said to herself. 
The sound of human voices had brought her a sense 
of being back in the world again, and the anxiety 
she had felt in the passage was gone. She smiled 
as she took another step forward. It would be 
a great tale to tell Peg. 

"But I 'm not out yet," Beatrice reminded 
herself, and at that moment her outstretched hand 
came in contact with another barrier. 

But this time she had no difficulty. At her 
first pressure, the door opened and let in a broad 
beam of light. Beatrice, blinking, looked into the 
dormitory, which had been the nursery in the 
old days of Denewood. 

Her first impulse was to dart out of the passage 
with adeep breath of thankfulness;butan instant's 
reflection showed her that it would be wise not to 
appear too abruptly. If there were any girls in 



738 



THE LUCK OF DENEWOOD 



[June 



the room she would probably frighten them into 
hysterics and at the same time betray her secret. 

She listened and, hearing nothing, peeped into 
the room. It was empty and, pulling the door 
tight shut behind her, she stepped through the 
fireplace. She was free! 

But she was now face 
to face with another 
difficulty. If she met 
any of the teachers, she 
would seemingly stand 
convicted of disobeying 
Miss Maple's rule that no 
day-scholars should go 
upstairs in Maple Hall; 
while if she ran hastily 
down to the big hall, the 
girls there could not fail 
to see her and draw the 
same inference. 

For a moment she hes- 
itated, then, forgetting 
that Miss Maple had 
gone to town, she deter- 
mined to go to her at 
once, plead guilty of hav- 
ing broken the rule and 
take the consequences. 

With this in mind, she 
crossed the corridor to 
the door of Miss 
Maple's sitting-room 
and knocked. 

A voice bade her come 
in and she entered, ex- 
pecting to see the school- 
mistress. 

I nstead , a rou nd -faced , 
red-haired little woman 
was standing in front of 
a skirt-board set on the 
backs of two chairs, 
sponging a dress that was 
spread out upon it. She 
nodded brightly at the 
sight of Beatrice. 

"Looking for Miss 
Maple, honey?" she asked briskly. "My, but you 
're dusty! You 'd better let me brush you off." 
She picked up a whisk and started to work with- 
out waiting for consent. "Now about Miss 
Maple — thank goodness she ain't here. She 's a 
good woman. There ain't a mite of doubt she 's 
the salt of the earth, but she does fidget me terri- 
ble. My land, I 'm just as much an old maid as 
she is, and I 've got just as good a right to be a 
fuss-budget. What was it you wanted, anyway? 
Maybe I can find it for you. Miss Maple ain't 



coming back till after dinner. I know, because 
she paid me before she left. I 'm Hitty Gorgas. 
Good old family, but come down in the world. 
I do sewin' by the day. 'T won't be a mite of 
trouble to get you anything you 're looking for." 




BE GAVE A GASP AND ALMOST DROPPED THE FRAME" 



Hitty Gorgas was known all over Germantown 
as a fine worker, with a tongue that was hung in 
the middle and wagged both ways. In fact, it 
was openly said that if she had no one to listen 
to her, she talked to herself rather than be silent. 
And Hitty would have been the last to deny this. 

Be had never heard of Hitty, but her words 
had started a new train of thought in the girl's 
mind. Instantly her determination was taken and 
she entered the room, closing the door behind her. 

This was her chance to search for the sixpence 



THE LUCK OF DENEWOOD 



739 



in Miss Maple's own stronghold, and she meant 
to seize it, no matter what penalty she incurred. 

"I am Beatrice de Soulange," she began abrupt- 
ly. "A cousin to this house." 

"Land sakes!" Miss Hitty put in, "I am glad to 
see you. I know all about you. I know all about 
every family in Germantown. The Wisters and 
the Darraghs and the Gummeys and the Morrises 
and the Carpenters and the Chews and every- 
body. I can tell you all about them from way 
back — which was Tories in the Revolution and 
how they 've stood in every war since then." 

"In such case," said Be, "you know how the 
luck of this house was los'. I do not need to tell 
you. But you do not know how much I want to 
find it, for when I do, I think my cousins come to 
their own 'ome to live, per'aps." 

Miss Hitty interrupted again. 

"You came to ask Miss Maple to let you look 
for it?" she asked; then, without waiting for an 
answer: "I see. Go right ahead, my dear. It 
won't do anybody a mite of harm." 

Be hesitated for a moment, then she shook her 
head. 

"No," she said firmly, "I did not come to ask. 
Already Miss Maple 'ave say it is a nonsense and 
forbid that we come up the stairs; but now I am 
here, I mean to hunt, because she is not at 'ome 
to stop me. And you must not tell me that I 
may, so that it is all my own blame." 

Miss Hitty looked at the girl with dancing eyes. 

"I like your grit," she said. "And I can tell 
you this much — I can feel for those who ain't so 
rich as they once was. I 'd a heap sight rather 
see the Traverses back in this place than have 
the school here, even though the school does put 
plums in my pudding." 

With which words she set busily to work at 
her task of cleaning Miss Maple's gowns, and Be 
started her inspection of the room. 

It was not large, for Denewood, but it was 
pleasant and cosy. The walls were wainscoted 
to a height of four feet in white painted wood. 
Above this hung sconces, several samplers, two 
silhouettes, and a miniature in wax. The furni- 
ture was chintz-covered mahogany. There was a 
card-table, a desk, a sofa, and various book-cases. 
The floor was made of narrow oak planks, with a 
pattern around the edge fashioned from the same 
wood laid at a different angle. 

She pressed her hands down into the space 
between the back and the seat of the sofa, while 
Miss Hitty looked up in the air speculatively. 

"The chairs and that sofa have sure been done 
oyer a lot of times," she remarked. "It don't do 
a mite of harm to look at it; but I can't think 
there 's much left of the old piece 'cept the wood- 
work. That portrait you 're looking at, they say 



was little Marjory Travers. Peg always seemed 
to me to favor her." 

"It does look like Paig," Be asserted. She had 
taken the wax miniature from its hook and carried 
it to the light, where she thoroughly examined it. 
"It is very pretty." 

She hung it up again and went over to a sampler. 
The verse embroidered on it was: 

When I was young and in my Prime 
You see how well I spent my Time, 

And by my sampler you may see 
What care my Mother took of me 

This was surmounted by a number of fearsome 
animals and signed, "Marjory Travers, her work," 
while beneath the signature were bands made of 
various intricate stitches and patterns. 

"I can embroider a little, but not so well as 
this," Be said. 

"And the child who made that was probably 
half your age," Miss Hitty told her. "For my 
part, I 'm thankful that samplers had gone out of 
style before my day. Seein' that I have to spend 
most of my time now prickin' my fingers with a 
needle, it 's just as well I did n't learn to hate it 
before I had to. That other sampler is sort of in- 
terestin'." She nodded toward a darker corner. 
"I never could make out why she took to working 
samplers at her age, unless it was to teach one of 
the grand-babies." 

Be took from its nail the frame Miss Hitty 
had indicated and walked to the window with it. 
Its square of linen canvas was elaborately worked 
with exquisitely fine stitches of silk in a design 
that came up solidly to a central wreath or vine, 
supported at the top by two doves and enclosing 
the following verse: 

You '11 seek and find To-morrow is your cry. 
In what far country doth To-morrow lie? 
Your treasure here is safe beneath your eye, 
So blame not John while Jack goes blindly by. 

Beatrice Travers, 1818. 

Be gave a gasp and almost dropped the frame. 

"What is it, child dear?" asked Miss Hitty, 
startled. "Do be careful. You came near lettin' 
that slip, and then a howl would have gone up! 
Though to be sure that sampler does belong to 
the family and not to the school." 

"But I 'ave foun' that sixpence!" cried Be, 
breathlessly, beginning to dance with excitement. 

CHAPTER XVIII 

PEG PLEADS WITH BETTY 

The discovery that Mr. Powell was down with 
influenza disturbed Peg profoundly. Back of all 
her schemes to cope with the wiles of Captain 
Badger was the thought that, if the worst came 
to the worst, her Cousin Bart could take the ma^- 



740 



THE LUCK OF DENEWOOD 



ter up and thrash it out with the British officer 
man to man. The fact that the captain had mis- 
taken the identity of Betty had been hailed by 
Peg as a favorable opportunity to elicit informa- 
tion upon which a wiser head than hers could act. 
Yet now that the information had been gained, 
there was no one to whom she could go for advice. 

Unlike Betty, Peg was more and more inclined 
to the belief that the basis of Badger's tale was 
true, namely that Louis de Soulange was alive 
and was being held for ransom. Otherwise, the 
circumstances of his death would have been 
known by this time, for he had not fallen in a 
great battle where one man might perish unob- 
served. Nor could the Germans have anything 
to gain by keeping him a secret prisoner. Indeed, 
the more she thought of it, the more the complete 
silence following Louis's disappearance seemed to 
prove the truth of Badger's explanation. This 
growing conviction gave Peg a realization of the 
seriousness of the problem she faced. A false step 
might doom Be's brother. The captain's actions 
were sufficiently significant, and to go contrary 
to his command for silence might force him to 
take desperate measures to guard his own safety. 

Peg walked slowly into the living-room and sat 
down again almost mechanically, entirely ab- 
sorbed in the perplexities of the situation. In the 
hall, Betty telephoned to her home in Chestnut 
Hill, and presently followed Peg in with the latest 
news of the invalids. 

"Aunt Polly says that everything is going as 
well as can be expected and that we are each to 
take six pills of Pulsatilla," she announced, sitting 
down on the sofa disconsolately. 

"I guess Aunt Polly is the only one who is 
enjoying it over there. She 'd rather take your 
temperature than go to a party. How 's Cousin 
Bart?" Peg ended. 

"The doctor has been in to see him and says 
there 's no doubt he has the flu," Betty replied. 
"He is n't to be disturbed about anything." 

"Of course not," Peg agreed. She had n't 
deluded herself by any false hopes in that 
direction. 

"I 'm not sure I ought n't to go home and help 
nurse the family," Betty went on. 

"They don't want you," said Peg. "If they 
did, they 'd have sent for you." 

"I know, but I think I ought to go anyhow," 
Betty half insisted. "It does n't seem right that 
I should n't have anything to do, while — " 

"You would be just one more person for Cousin 
Elizabeth to worry about," Peg pointed out 
sensibly. "And besides," she added significantly, 
"you have something to do here!" 

"You mean Captain Badger," Betty remarked, 
preparing for a struggle. 



[June 

"I certainly do !" Peg's tone was incisive. 
"Well, I 'm through with him," Betty an- 
nounced positively. "You can't expect me to 
talk to a brigand all alone again. It was all 
very W ell when I did n't know; but now, I don't 
think Father and Mother would approve." 

"I don't believe they would, either," Peg 
agreed, "not under ordinary circumstances, any- 
way; but that 's something we can't find out, and 
these circumstances are so far from ordinary that 
I think they 'd say, 'Go.' You simply must meet 
him. ^ I '11 be in the spring-house to protect you." 

This one thing, at least, Peg had determined 
upon: the appointment with Captain Badger 
must be kept; and if possible, he must be -per- 
suaded to give them more time. 

"You would n't be any protection from a 
brigand!" Betty said scornfully. 

"He is n't going to brigand you," Peg replied 
irr tably. "Have some sense, Betty. He 's 
bound to be the polite English captain if he ex- 
pects to get anything out of you. The last thing 
he '11 do is to be disagreeable." 

"But what shall I tell him?" Betty argued. 
"I have n't thought of that yet," Peg confessed ; 
"but there 's one thing we have to do — we must 
find some way of convincing him that we need a 
few more days' time." 

"He won't give them to us," Betty protested. 
"He '11 have to," Peg asserted, with more 
confidence than she felt. "Don't you see, Betty, 
if we 're right in our guess that he wants money 
for himself, he '11 stay as long as he thinks there 's 
a chance of getting it? All we have to do is to 
let him believe that sooner or later we 11 give in 
and tell him what he wants to know." 

"But we can't do it," Betty reiterated. "So 
what 's the use of pretending?" 

"If I could pretend as well as you can, I 'd love 
the chance," Peg said sweetly. 

"You can't flatter me into giving you your own 
way," Betty insisted. "Besides, we should n't 
have anything to do with him. From what you 
said yourself, he can't be trusted. If we knew, 
we would n't tell him where that strong-box is." 
"Oh, yes, we would," Peg retorted. 
"But if you think he 's the man who kidnapped 
Louis de Soulange, he should n't have a cent!" 
Betty protested warmly. "He 's a robber, yet 
you talk of giving him just what he wants." 

"Of course I do!" Peg answered impatiently. 
"He may be anything you like, but if he 's the 
only person who knows where Louis is, we '11 
have to deal with him, won't we, no matter how 
many times a brigand he is?" 

"It would n't be right," Betty maintained. 
"It would n't be right to let Louis de Soulange 
die, would it?" Peg questioned. 



THE LUCK OF DENEWOOD 



741 



"I think we should send for the police," Betty 
returned half-heartedly. 

"You know as well as I do that we dare n't do 
any such thing," Peg asserted. "What 's the use 
of talking like that? Suppose something hap- 
pened that this man Badger did n't like and he 
disappeared? Then where should we be?" 

"I don't believe anything he says, anyway," 
Betty replied. 

"I believe some of it," Peg insisted. 

"I believe he wants money," Betty agreed with 
a mocking laugh. "All the rest of the story is 
just made up; I know it is." 

"Are you so sure of that that you are willing to 
tell Be you just let him go?" Peg demanded. 
"Do you feel that we dare run the risk of letting 
something happen to Louis de Soulange just 
because we think Captain Badger is n't telling 
the truth? I guess not!" 

"I don't know what to do," said Betty, help- 
lessly; "I don't know where the Soulange strong- 
box is, if there is one, and — and — oh, I think we 're 
in an awful mess!" 

"Oh, forget about us!" Peg cried angrily. 
"I 'm thinking of Be and her brother." 

"Then why don't you tell her?" demanded 
Betty. 

"I 'm afraid of the shock. You know as well 
as I do the risk to her," Peg explained soberly. 
"I guess we '11 have to tell her sooner or later, only 
I 'd like to make sure it 's necessary first. It 
would be an awful thing to raise her hopes, and 
then nothing come of it. If I were just sure, one 
way or the other! I believe I '11 go with you to- 
morrow, when you see this captain, and tell him 
we don't trust him, and then see what he does. 
As a last resort, we can explain that you are not 
Be, then he '11 stay till he sees the real Be. That 
's what we '11 do, Betty," Peg went on as this new 
thought took shape; "we won't say that we don't 
believe him, but just the truth, that, when we 
found how terribly serious it was, we were worried 
— and we '11 be awfully sympathetic, and — " 

"Of course, we don't know that he is n't just 
what he says he is," Betty remarked thoughtfully, 
as this sudden enthusiasm of Peg's impressed 
itself upon her. "And he 's awfully handsome." 

"There 's no doubt of that!" agreed Peg, 
whole-heartedly. "And he has lovely manners, 
and — and — and — that 's what we '11 do ! He may 
be a little cross; but when he sees how sorry we 
are, he '11 just have to be nice, and we '11 promise 
not to say a word to anybody, and then we '11 take 
Be to see him, if we have to, but we '11 have gained 
that much time. Cousin Bart might be better 
even. So that 's settled, is n't it?" 

"I think so," Betty said, nodding, "although I 
don't know how he '11 take it." 



"Oh, he '11 take it all right," Peg insisted, jump- 
ing up. "And now let 's find Be. She '11 think 
we 're lost. And be careful. Not a word to her 
yet." 

"I wonder where she is," Betty remarked, as 
they hurried out of the room. 

CHAPTER XIX 

A STRANGE HIDING-PLACE 

In Miss Maple's sitting-room, Be's announcement 
and her evident excitement stirred Miss Hitty's 
curiosity. 

"Land sakes, child! what are you talking 
about?" she cried, running to the girl's side. "Do 
be careful of that sampler! If you drop it, there 
will be trouble. Stop dancing and be sensible." 

With a great effort, Be controlled herself, at 
least enough to stand still. 

"But I 'ave found a piece of the sixpence," she 
repeated ecstatically. "You will see — here!" 
She held the framed sampler in front of Miss 
Hitty's face, but the old lady, after a near-sighted 
glance at it, looked up at Be. 

"Say, there ain't nothing wrong with your 
head, is there?" she asked a trifle anxiously. 

"Inmy'ead, wrong?" Be repeated, not under- 
standing Miss Hitty's idiom. "It is not in my 
'ead, but in the sampler. Look!" Again the 
seamstress gazed at the worked linen in Be's 
hand, while the girl with trembling fingers pointed 
to the embroidered wreath under the glass. 

"Do you not see it?" she went on excitedly. 
"There, among the stitches, is the chain. I 
catch the sparkle of it as I take it to the window. 
You do see, eh?" 

"Land sakes, I believe I do!" said Miss Hitty, 
growing animated. "Why it 's all worked in 
among those leaves! My, ain't you the clever 
child? And there 's the bit of sixpence made to 
look like a flower. Say, that old Beatrice Travers 
was smart — I must say it. She was smart!" 

"We mus' take it out at once," Beatrice de- 
clared. "Where can I break the glass?" 

She was looking around for a suitable place to 
put her threat into execution when Miss Hitty 
grasped her arm. 

"Softly, child! softly!" she admonished, "I 
don't know as we ought to do such a thing. Maybe 
theTraverses won't like our ripping up that pretty 
old sampler. But anyhow, we don't have to 
break anything. We can open up the back." 

"More than anything do the Travers want their 
sixpence," declared Be, positively. "It mus' 
come out! to bring back the luck of the 'ouse 
some one of the family mus' wear it. That you 
know." 

"I know a lot of things," Miss Hitty conceded; 



742 



THE LUCK OF DENEWOOD 



[June 



"but give me that frame before you smash it. 
Perhaps we can take the coin out without ruin- 
ing everything." She took the frame from Be's 
rather reluctant hand, and turning it over, she 
deftly removed with her scissors the small nails 
holding the back. Then she slipped the old 
sampler out and laid it on the table. Two heads 
bent over it anxiously to examine the ancient 
treasure more closely. 

Suddenly Miss Hitty raised an excited face to 
Be. "I 'm blest if I don't believe you 're right, 
child!" she exclaimed. "The old lady that did 
this did n't intend that it should stay here forever. 
She 's fixed it so we can take the chain out, and 
the sampler won't be a mite the worse." 

With careful fingers old Miss Hitty unfastened 
the clasp holding the two ends of the chain 
together and then considered the matter carefully. 

"I guess she meant to have it pulled from this 
end right through like a drawing-string," she went 
on, talking half to herself; "but after all these 
years, the silk may n't be none too strong. I 'm 
going to take my time over it." 

She sat down at the table and, with great 
deliberation, began to draw the chain through 
the silken loops, while Be watched her with 
breathless interest. Suddenly Miss Hitty uttered 
an exclamation of surprise. 

"What is it that it is?" demanded Be, transla- 
ting literally in her excitement. 

"Wonders will never cease!" cried Miss Hitty. 
"Old Lady Travers was a foxy one, all right. 
Who 'd have thought of such a thing! Look, 
honey; under the real chain she 's embroidered 
one, so that when we 've drawn the gold one clear, 
it will never be missed." 

It took half an hour, but at the end of that time 
the sampler was back in its frame and hanging on 
the wall, and Miss Hitty and Be looked at each 
other with sparkling eyes. 

"Let me put it on you, child," said the old 
seamstress. "That 's the safest place for it. You 
don't want to lose it now you 've found it again." 

"Indeed no!" cried Be, and bent her head while 
Miss Hitty fastened the clasps securely at the 
back of her slender neck. 

"Now I mus' run and tell Paig!" Be exclaimed. 
"She will so wish to know about it and learn that 
t he luck has come back. Oh, thank you so much, 
Miss Hitty Gorgas." 

"Land sakes, child! you don't have to thank 
me," said the other. "I would n't have missed 
this last half-hour for a farm. And say," she 
went on, a little more seriously, "I ain't much on 
superstitions, though there 's some of them it 's 
well to be careful of. But what I was thinking 
was this: maybe the Travers' bad luck has been 
on account of that sixpence being lost, — I should 



n't wonder if that was so, — but I 've always 
thought there was a heap of luck in a pretty face, 
and you 've brought that to them, honey. Good- 
by, my dear, I 'm glad you came in." 

"Good-by," answered Be, and hurried out into 
the hall, intent upon returning to the lodge in the 
shortest possible time. 

It was only as she turned the corner of the 
corridor and was about to run down the stairs 
that once more Beatrice came to a realization of 
the fact that she was on the forbidden second 
floor of Maple Hall, and in the great hall below 
her, walking toward the stairs with one of the 
girls, was Miss Thomas, Miss Maple's second in 
command. Quick as thought, Be turned back 
and instinctively sought a hiding-place in the 
dormitory. More than ever she must guard the 
secret of the passage and the explanation of her 
being on the prohibited floor. 

The dormitory was deserted, and she waited 
at the edge of the fireplace for a moment, hoping 
that Miss Thomas would pass; but in this she was 
disappointed. She heard footsteps stop and turn 
into the room, and moved back softly into the 
passage, half closing the door in front of her. 

"My dear," Miss Thomas began, as they came 
in, "we 're absolutely alone here, and you can 
talk to me quite unreservedly." 

"I 'd just die if the other girls found out," a 
tearful voice said ; and Beatrice, who had no wish 
to overhear so secret a confidence, was in a quan- 
dary. For an instant she was in half a mind to 
go out boldly. She was not at all afraid of Miss 
Thomas, or of Miss Maple, for that matter; but 
on calling to mind all the facts connected with 
the recovery of the sixpence, she did not feel sure 
what the result might be if she made a clean 
breast of it to the head of the school. Of one 
thing, however, she felt certain: Miss Maple 
would not be inclined to deal leniently with one 
whom she did not like. And suppose she should 
insist that the sixpence be restored to its place in 
the sampler, as part of the rented furnishings. 

"Non! I shall not go back and get caught!" 
On that point Be was resolved, even if she had to 
wait in the passage indefinitely. 

This time she was not at all afraid. She could, 
of course, come out whenever she wished. After 
an instant she turned and tiptoed to the top of the 
steep stair, then, descending, she passed under the 
barrier where she had almost given up in despair. 
She stood there a moment, annoyed at being held 
back from running to Peg, and reflecting that for 
a considerable time there was no chance of getting 
out through the dormitory unseen. 

"I go again and push that trap-door," she said 
to herself, impatient at the delay, and searching 
about in her mind for a means of escape. It 



IQ2i] 



THE LUCK OF DENEWOOD 



743 



would do no harm to try. But first she carefully 
replaced the step before she hurried down. 

Going in this direction, the light was all ahead 
of her until she entered the underground passage. 
She felt she was on familiar ground, and in spite 
of the darkness, she went forward quickly. In 
the lower passage, where the dusk deepened, she 
slackened her pace and began to grope ahead, 
expecting to encounter the first of the short flight 
of steps leading up to the spring-house, and at 
length her foot struck a projection. 

Feeling her way cautiously, she mounted until 
her hair touched the top, then she raised her hands 
to lift the trap. 

"It will be no use, I suppose," she said to her- 
self; but to her great joy and surprise, the square 
door above her head moved easily, and a moment 
more she was out in the light again, looking down 
at the closed trap in wonder. 

(To be 



"Now how is that?" she wondered. "Before it 
would not open. Now — " She shrugged her 
shoulders in the French fashion, then a light 
entered her mind, "Commeje suis bete!" ["How 
stupid I am!"] she said; "it is the lucky sixpence, 
of course!" and turned to leave the house. As 
she did so, her eye lit upon the little toad look- 
ing up at her. 

"Ah, Monsieur Crapaud, you are still there. 
I 'ave to thank you a thousand times!" she said. 

Outside the door she nearly collided with a 
man who was standing and hurriedly poking 
about in the grass near one of the benches with a 
walking-stick. 

With a slight exclamation of surprise she halted, 
and the intruder looked up and saw her. It was 
Captain Badger, and Be recognized him at once 
as the English officer she had passed one afternoon 
on her way to the lodge. 

continued) 



THE LAND CALL 



By EDITH BALLINGER PRICE 




Off swung I with a song on my lip, 

Down to great waters a-seeking a ship; 

My eyes to the west and my stick in my hand, 

So I beheld her a-coming to land. 

The wind in her tops'ls, the foam at her bow 
(Ah, I remember the look of her, now!), 
Beating up handily into the bay, 
Casting my soul in a spell that day. 

Years upon years can I now look back 

On the wandering thread of a sea-blown track; 

Round the Horn and across the Line, 

In the black gale's teeth or the hot star-shine. 

Oh, the taut shrouds' tune and the halyards' 
creak, 

And the cry of the sails when the northers speak, 
And the voice of the sea on a hurrying keel, 
Ever and ever my heart shall feel. 

Yet — when we drop past the shores of Clyde, 
Slipping in with the evening tide, 
When the sheep bells blow on the landward air, 
And the dusk is come, and the moon hangs fair, 



When the harbor lights shine out so still, 
My eyes turn back against my will 
To the windy top of Ardrossan Hill — 
The hill where I stood with a song on my lip, 
Before that I plighted myself to a ship. 



THE BIGGEST FAMILY IN NEW YORK'S 
EXECUTIVE MANSION 



By HAROLD G. McCOY 



Children crowd the famous executive mansion 
in Albany, New York's home for its governor, now 
that Governor Nathan L. Miller has taken 
possession. 

All records as to the number of children in 
the stately old Governor's residence have been 




CONSTANCE AND LOUISE MILLER AND THEIR 
DOG SCOUT 



broken, and they will be shattered still further 
when Governor Miller can induce his first grand- 
child to visit him in the big house on the hill in 
Albany. 

There are seven children in the Miller family, 
from youngsters to grown-ups — more than ever 
before made their home there. They are a mighty 
proud lot, now that they have moved from the 
big old English home in Syracuse, with its wonder- 
ful lawns and gardens, to the "first home in the 
State." 

It was long before Governor Miller was nomi- 
nated for the governorship, — in fact, when he was 
asserting that he would not accept the nomina- 
tion, — that some one tried to reach him by tele- 
phone and found him away on his vacation. One 
of the Miller youngsters answered, and when the 
inquirer had learned where Judge Miller and Mrs. 
Miller were staying, he persisted with this query: 

"How would you like to go down to Albany and 
live in the big executive mansion and have your 
father governor?" 

There was a bit of hesitation, and then Louise, 
one of- the famous Miller twins answered: 

"Oo-oo-oh, would n't that be w-o-n-d-e-r-f-u-1 !" 

Well, it has come true, and Louise, one of the 
outdoor youngsters who scampered by day all 
over James Street hill in Syracuse, is now living 



in the big executive mansion at Albany and has 
her father for governor. Of course, it 's "wonder- 
ful!" 

If there ever was a healthy lot of outdoor young- 
sters, these Miller children are they. From Con- 
stance, the baby of the family, to Mildred, the 
oldest, now married, with a baby of her own, they 
are conspicuous examples of what outdoor life 
means to a child. 

A lively troop of children they are! After 
their father had been nominated for governor 
last summer, photographers began to descend on 
the Miller home for pictures of the nominee and 
his family. A day for them was fixed, and the 
family gathered together. 1 1 was some job, for the 
children were playing all over the neighborhood. 

Movie men set up their ponderous cameras, 
and newspaper photographers scurried back and 
forth across the lawns, peering into the ground 
glass of their cameras, trying to catch the children 
at play. It was no use! They were too active, 
and in the end Judge Miller had to gather his 
flock around him. Marshalling them as a movie 
director handles action, he put his family through 
their stunts and turned them out as finished movie 
actors. 

He marched them across the big lawns while 
the movie men ground out hundreds of feet of 
film and the "still" photographers snapped their 
camera-shutters until their plate cases were 
empty. 

But there was one of his "actors" Judge Miller 
could not control. It was Scout, the new canine 
lord of the executive mansion grounds, a rangy 
police-dog who is the particular pet of the Miller 
children. Only once would Scout consent to pose 
for his picture, and then his mind was somewhere 
else, for his eyes were not on the lens, but far 
away. This posing does bore one! Especially, 
when one is to be the lord high keeper of the big 
grounds at the executive mansion. 

There has often been a large family of chil- 
dren in the executive mansion — six when Colonel 
Roosevelt was governor, and five during the recent 
administration of Governor Smith. But to-day 
there are seven, Constance, the youngest, then 
the twins, Eleanor and Louise, Elizabeth, Mar- 
garet, and Marian. The oldest, Mildred, is now 
Mrs. D. P. McCarthy, wife of a soldier of the 
second division of the A. E. F. 

A happy, healthy family they are, watched 
over by their mother, a fine, old-fashioned Amer- 
ican mother. 



744 




WHEN THE LINE MOVES UP 

Once more Young America is saddened by the 
approach of the end of a year of school. Soon 
are to begin the dreary days of nothing-to-do 
except swim and go fishin', play tennis or baseball, 
and wait for September to come. 
The line moves up. 

The Very Little Folk say good-by to the kinder- 
garten, the grammar-school boys and girls begin 
to think of the weighty responsibilities of high 
school, and the high-school folks prepare to go to 
college to be freshmen all over again. 

The line moves up. 

Everybody is making progress. Everybody is 
looking ahead. Everybody has something to hope 
and work for. A hitching-post can stand still, but 
the horse that wants oats must keep moving. 

"Onward and upward" used to be the motto of 
the Sunday-school books. It is n't fashionable, 
nowadays, to talk like that; and yet the old 
phrase has a helpful suggestion. It 's cheerful! 
When you 're moving onward and upward, you 're 
alive, you 're in the race, you count! 

Commencement time is a good time to take a 
look backward, to see how much you 've gained 
in the last year; and a look forward, to see what 's 
ahead. Keep in step, don't straggle, when — 

The line moves up. 

FACTS ABOUT THE CENSUS 

The first national census was taken in 1790, and 
since then the count has been made every ten 
years. The first census, in 1790, gave a total popu- 
lation of less than 4,000,000. The fourteenth, 
last year, gives a total of more than 105,000,000. 
It cost more than $23,000,000 to take it. 

Five States now have populations larger than 
that of the nation in 1790: Texas, with 4,663,228; 
Ohio, 5.759-395; Illinois, 6,485,280; Pennsylvania, 
8,720,017, and New York, 10,384,829. New York 



City now has a million or so more inhabitants 
than the whole Union had 130 years ago. 

The census is more than a mere counting of 
individuals. Many large volumes are needed for 
it. The population is divided into groups by age, 
by race and color, and by occupation. It estab- 
lishes the basis of representation in Congress, and 
is used in calculating taxes, in the draft for the 
army in the war, and by insurance, banking, and 
other companies in managing their business. 

PRESIDENT AND CONGRESS 

The very thing that makes it hard to write The 
Watch Tower, the long interval between the 
writing and the publication of the articles, ought 
to make these pages only the better worth reading. 
The Watch Tower is a review, and it gives you 
the advantage of seeing recent events from two 
angles. As this article is written, President 
Harding's first message to Congress is a matter 
of the day's news. When you read it, you will 
be able to check up its "points" with actual 
performances. 

On Tuesday, April 12, President Harding ap- 
peared in person before the Senators and Repre- 
sentatives, and read his message. The President 
explained that the special session had been called 
because of the existence of problems, domestic 
and international, "too pressing to be long neg- 
lected." He urged that the home problems be 
taken up first in the program of legislation. 

Economy, President Harding said, was the 
watchword; but it must be made more than that, 
it must become a reality. The nation's expendi- 
tures must be cut down to fit the nation's income. 
The payment of the war debt must be arranged 
in a businesslike way, so that the amount may 
be reduced steadily, year by year. Current ex- 
penses must be cut down; all the government de- 
partments had been ordered to organize their 



745 



746 



THE WATCH TOWER 



[June 









ill 








Iff 1 






Wide World 1'hoto 



PRESIDENT HARDING READING HIS FIRST MESSAGE TO CONGRESS 



work in the most economical way possible. 
Further, President Harding advised that the 
system of taxation be overhauled, and urged early 
adoption of a protective tariff, and a reduction of 
the high cost of government. "I have said to 
the people," he remarked, "that we mean to have 
less of government in business and more business 
in the Government." 

Taking up the matter of the railroads, the 
President urged Congress to lower the rates of 
transportation. "Freight-carrying charges," he 
said, "have mounted higher and higher, until 
commerce is halted and production lowered. 
Railway rates and costs of operation must be 
reduced." 

Another problem is that of the public highways. 
Transportation by auto-truck helps lighten the 
burden of the railroads, but it cannot be developed 
as it ought to be unless and until we have better 
roads. "I know of nothing," said the President, 
"more shocking than the millions of public funds 
wasted in improved highways — wasted because 
there is no policy of maintenance." 

Our Chief Magistrate asked Congress to con- 
sider ways and means of developing American 
ownership of wireless plants and cables; of im- 
proving and expanding our commercial and 
military facilities for air navigation; for taking 
care of disabled veterans of the A. E. F., and for 
instituting a National Department of Public 
Welfare, to supervise the work of education, health 
protection, and child welfare. The regulation 



of these matters is now distributed among a 
number of bureaus in separate departments. 

Taking up our foreign relations, the President 
outlined a policy whereby America would defi- 
nitely "reject" the League of Nations as now con- 
stituted, and undertake only to cooperate with 
Europe on recognition of our war-won rights. 
He urged Congress to pass, at once, a resolution 
declaring us at peace with Germany. 

As you read this, in June, it will be interesting 
to see just how far Congress has been able to go 
toward realization of this program. 

THE "GENERAL STRIKE" IN 
ENGLAND 

The attempt by a part of British labor to bring 
about a stoppage of all industry showed perhaps 
even more startlingly than the story of commun- 
ism in Russia the danger of trying to cancel the 
laws of nature in regard to human life. Such a 
state of affairs in England comes nearer home to 
us than the horrors of Bolshevism in Russia. 

Men have equal opportunity, so far as their 
relation to the State is concerned. But men do 
not have equal abilities. Laws that permit the 
industrious man to prosper are good laws. Laws 
that permit unscrupulous men to take advantage 
of honest men are bad laws. 

Bad laws can be killed, and good ones passed in 
their place. But when any one part of the popu- 
lation tries to dictate how the government shall 



THE WATCH TOWER 



747 



be run, the result is lawlessness. Foolish labor- 
leaders who threaten to put a stop to all produc- 
tive industry and public service are a danger to 
the whole State. They would destroy what they 
could not replace. 

Thank heaven for the good practical sense of 
American workers! We are all workers. We 
must be careful to keep our love of fair play and 
square dealing all round. 

JOHN BURROUGHS 

On his way home from the West to celebrate his 
eighty- fourth birthday, John Burroughs died, and 
his funeral was held on the day for which the 
birthday observance had been planned. The 
friend and student of Nature was buried in the 
place where he had spent many happy hours 
searching out the secrets of bird and tree life. 

John Burroughs pursued his studies in an out- 
door laboratory. You cannot imagine him devot- 
ing a lifetime to chemical analyses or scientific 
formulas. He was interested in life and its mean- 
ing. The birds and the bees, the flowers and the 
fishes, were all bearers of a message that he tried 
to read. In many, many books he told the Story 
of Nature as it unfolded before him. To thou- 
sands of readers his writings brought knowledge 
and inspiration to study. 

The studies of John Burroughs, and the writings 
in which he reported them and presented their 
results to the public, were a very important con- 
tribution to our American civilization, which 
strives to make the world a safe and happy one to 
live in. 

PROGRESS IN THE BALTIC STATES 

Dr. Rudolf Holsti, Finland's Minister of For- 
eign Affairs, said in an interview that the Baltic 
States had made remarkable progress since the 
war. "The Russians," he said, "carried away all 
they could; the Germans took what little the 
Russians had left; and then the Reds smashed up 
what could not be moved." 

Five new states were brought into being in 
northeastern Europe. Since the war, they have 
all been productively engaged, and in contrast to 
Russia, they have endeavored to take a place in 
the world's work of reconstruction. Their work- 
men may not be as happy as angels, but they are 
doing pretty well and are not inclined to follow 
the Russian example. 

These new states stand between Russia and 
the route of commerce out through the Baltic, but 
they do not close that route to any future develop- 
ment of Russian trading. Dr. Holsti regards the 
dispute between Finland and the Aland Islands 
as only a passing difficulty, and believes that 



Lithuania and the Poles will be able to "get 
along." The mere fact that a Baltic statesman 
chooses to say these things is an encouraging 
sign for the future of the old Baltic kingdoms and 
the new Baltic republics. 

A FRIENDLY CRITIC GETS A 
FRIENDLY ANSWER 

This letter has been received, read with careful 
attention, and set aside for notice in The Watch 
Tower because it presents an honest criticism 
that concerns us all: 

Lincoln University, Pa. 

April 2, 1921. 

Editor of St. Nicholas; 
Dear Sir: 

It seems to me a pity that the writer of The Watch 
Tower should miss an opportunity to make for the end- 
ing of war and inter-racial enmity in the remarks he 
makes concerning certain countries. We certainly do 
not wish a war with Japan, and a good many of us want 
to see a new Germany. 

Why, then, keep before the younger generation, who 
were in no way responsible, the hatefulness, the crime, 
and the savagery of the late war? He says: "Sympathy 
for Germany is like sympathy for a man who has delib- 
erately set fire to a house and is not even sorry for the 
destruction of life and property he has caused." Grant- 
ed. But does it follow that the children and the grand- 
children of the man who burned the house and the man 
whose house was burned are to swear eternal enmity? 

It seems to me that The Watch Tower is losing an 
opportunity of restoring peace and good will among the 
men and women of the morrow. The hatred of North 
and South would have died out sooner if the grown-ups 
had not deliberately passed on their prejudices and 
enmities to the children. 

In saying this I am no Germanophile, nor do I forget 
any of Germany's crimes, but I do not think it necessary 
either for justice or for patriotism to train children to 
hate other children because of the crimes of the fathers. 
Very truly, 

George Johnson. 

The question here brought up is a difficult one. 
The Watch Tower preaches no Gospel of Hate. 
No reader of it can fairly affirm that it has ever 
spoken in a spirit of revenge, or that it has in- 
tentionally encouraged "inter-racial enmity." 
And we do not believe that our articles fail to 
embody quite accurately our intention, which is: 
to get at the facts, even if it hurts, when there is 
something good to be gained in the end. 

A nation is made up of all its citizens. The 
nation is a personality composed of millions of 
personal units. You who read this are a part of 
America; so am I who write it. So are more than 
a hundred million other persons — old and young, 
rich and poor, good and bad, wise and foolish. 
We are all parts of a great nation which has to 
deal with other nations just as individual persons 
have to deal with one another. 

A person who does not pay his bills is a bad 



748 THE WAT 

factor in the community. He makes other people 
pay for his wrong-doing. A person who is reck- 
less with a gun endangers the lives of others, who 
are not on guard against such perils. In a com- 
munity of individuals, of states, or of nations, each 
one must make his conduct, where it affects others, 
fit the rules adopted by the community for its 
protection. Failing to do so, he must be brought 
to book: first, for his own good; second, for the 




Wide World Photo 



AMBASSADOR JULES JUSSERAND AND SPECIAL ENVOY 
RENE VIVIANI LEAVING THE WHITE HOUSE AFTER 
CALLING UPON PRESIDENT HARDING 

protection of other individuals; third, for the 
preservation of civilization, which is nothing 
more or less than the organization of communities 
for the common welfare, in contrast with the life 
of savages, where it 's every one for himself. 

"Losing an opportunity of restoring peace and 
good will?" The Watch Tower man would shed 
every 'drop of ink in his veins to accomplish that 
restoration ! The Watch Tower boys and girls 
have given time, work, and money for every work 
of relief and reconstruction. 

We don't think there is any danger at all of a 
war with Japan. We want to see Germany cured 
and worthy again of respect and confidence. But 
we believe the way to avoid war with Japan is to 
discuss freely and openly the difficulties that 
undeniably do exist. We do not believe that 
they can be removed by shutting our eyes to them. 
And, ready and anxious as we are to see signs of 



an honest intention on the part of Germany to 
do the right thing, we are not going to let our- 
selves be betrayed. Germany must keep her 
word, even if she has to be forced to it. We should 
like nothing better than to see Young Germany 
take hold and make good ; but it has n't happened 
yet. 

Meanwhile, The Watch Tower will continue 
to be, as it always has been, American through 
and through; not "training children to hate other 
children because of the crimes of the fathers," 
but teaching children to think for themselves, 
to stand for the two-sided square deal, and to be 
Americans with backbone. 

OUR FRIEND, FRANCE 

Ambassador Jusserand, who represents France 
in this country, and M. Rene Viviani, former 
prime minister, sent to us on a special mission, 
have assured Americans, in the most unreserved 
manner, that France is this country's friend. M. 
Viviani was greeted at New York with great 
enthusiasm by an audience that packed Carnegie 
Hall, and in a most eloquent address he promised 
that the countrymen of Lafayette would always 
be ready to help defend American freedom against 
attack. 

Coming from the French Government's official 
representative, these assurances have great au- 
thority. It is pleasant to know that the nations 
back of the two Governments share this friendly 
feeling. 

THROUGH THE WATCH TOWER'S 
TELESCOPE 

The Committee on Election Laws of the Massa- 
chusetts Legislature drew up, in April, a bill pro- 
viding a penalty to be imposed upon qualified 
voters who neglect to cast a ballot in a city, state, 
or national election. The bill, as the committee 
proposed to submit it, fixed a fine of five dollars 
for such offense. We often speak of the right to 
vote or the privilege of voting, and forget that 
voting is a duty. The community has a right to 
require every qualified voter to express his pref- 
erence. The election is supposed and intended to 
embody the desires of all citizens with voting 
power, and every absentee from the polls weakens 
the representative quality of.the balloting. Would 
the idea of compulsory voting be popular? It 
would greatly increase the cost and work of hold- 
ing elections. 

The veteran suffrage leader, Mrs. Carrie Chap- 
man Catt, made a stirring appeal to women 
to "do something" to put an end to war forever. 
"It seems to me," she said, "that God is giving a 



THE WATCH TOWER 



749 





© Kadel and Herbert 

THE STUDENT FIRE-DEPARTMENT OF STEPHENS COLLEGE, COLUMBIA, MISSOURI, OUT FOR A PRACTICE RUN 



call to the women of the world to come forward 
and say, 'You shall no longer slay your fellow- 
men.' " Mrs. Catt's eloquent appeal commands 
almost universal sympathy, but most of us are 
inclined to give President Harding a little more 
time before accusing his Administration of being 
"stolid and inactive." The National League of 
Women Voters appealed to Congress to take the 
lead in a program of disarmament. 

In the last week of March and the first half of 
April, in Japan, more than 6,000 houses were de- 
stroyed in three fires, two in Tokio and one in 
Hakodate. The first conflagration in Tokio 
threatened to destroy the whole city. 

In the first three months of this year, it is reported, 
42,000 persons emigrated from Italy to the 
United States, and 29,000 to various countries in 
South America. 

Ex-President Taft said recently: "I believe 
that legislation may be more or less helpful in 
increasing among men equality of opportunity, 
but the question is: Have men the courage, char- 
acter, and foresight individually to improve that 
equality of opportunity?" Mr. Taft, in the same 
address, criticized labor for lack of interest in its 
tasks. With utmost respect for the great army of 
faithful workers to whom such criticism does not 
apply, we must say that it does seem that a great 
many people fail to meet the earn-your-living 



problem in just the right spirit. Whether there 
are more such in this age than there have been in 
other ages, we leave to the judgment of others. 

The New York State Senate passed, by a vote of 
38 to 7, a bill requiring public-school teachers to 
pass loyalty tests. Two kinds of teachers would 
object to these tests: those who are most loyal, 
and those who are disloyal. Opposition to the 
bill was based on the good old American plan of 
letting citizens take care of some things them- 
selves, instead of having the Government do it. 
But such personal freedom requires very high 
quality in those who enjoy the privilege! In one 
way or another, we must make sure that the 
school-teachers of all our land are 100 per cent. 
American. 

The students at Stephens College, Columbia, 
Missouri, a junior college for girls, have a self- 
governing board which not only includes execu- 
tive, legislative and judicial departments, but also 
includes an organized fire-department. The fire- 
chief is elected by the student body at the begin- 
ning of each school year. The chief has complete 
control of the appointments, selecting captains in 
the various dormitories and lieutenants for each 
floor in each dormitory. Fire-drills are held 
from time to time, and the organization has be- 
come so efficient that the buildings are entirely 
emptied within three minutes after the alarm is 
sounded. 



NATURE AND SCIENCE FOR YOUNG FOLK 



ROLLING OVER A CAPSIZED BATTLE-SHIP 

American engineers have accomplished so many 
wonderful things that we are apt to overlook the 
fact that other nations also possess engineers 
capable of performing marvelous achievements. 
Most of our readers probably do not realize that 
the Italians are remarkably ingenious and daring, 
particularly in aeronautic and marine engineer- 
ing. They probably inherit some of the genius 
that made the old Romans the greatest engineers 
of their day. 

Italian engineers were recently faced with a 




International 



THE "LEONARDO DA VINCI" IN DRY-DOCK 

vexing problem, which they solved in a wonder- 
fully neat and original manner. 

It was in August, 1916, that a terrific explosion 
was heard in the harbor of Taranto, and the 
dreadnought Leonardo da Vinci was seen to settle 
down by the stern and turn turtle. The after 
magazines had exploded, tearing a large hole in 
the hull of the vessel. Immediately, the water 
poured in and weighted down one side of the 
vessel, so that it rolled over and sank, bottom up- 



ward. It all happened within ten minutes and 
249 officers and men were killed. At the point 
where the accident occurred, the water was only 
six fathoms (thirty-six feet) deep, and the bottom 
of the vessel projected above water-level. 

The Leonardo da Vinci was one of the most 
important vessels in the Italian Navy. She was 
650 feet long and had a displacement of 22,380 
tons. She was fitted with thirteen 12-inch gulis, 
eighteen 4.7-inch guns, and eighteen 3-inch guns, 
besides three torpedo-tubes. The sinking of this 
vessel was a serious loss, and it was particularly 
tantalizing to have the boat lying helpless right 
there in the harbor in plain sight. Immediately, 
engineers set about the task of righting the vessel. 
The first plan was to construct a large floating 
dock which would lift up the boat and permit of 
repairing it in the open, but the pressure of the 
war was such that neither money, men, nor ma- 
terial could be spared, and the Italians, realizing 
that probably the vessel could not be salvaged and 
put back into service before the end of the war, 
proceeded in more leisurely way to work out a 
plan of operations. The first thing they did was 
to build large models of the ship, to study out 
just why it capsized and just how it could be 
righted again. It was finally decided to raise the 
vessel bottom upward, and then tow it into a dry- 
dock, where repairs could be completed, after 
which would come the task of righting it. 

The dry-dock at Taranto is only forty feet 
deep,- and the vessel could not enter it keel upward 
without having the funnels, gun-turrets, and all 
superstructures above the forecastle deck re- 
moved. This proved to be a very difficult task, 
because the wreck had sunk deep into the muddy 
bottom. The plan was first to make temporary 
repairs of the holes that had been torn in the hull, 
and then to pump air into the hull until it floated. 
Men would then enter the hull through air-locks 
and cut away the superstructure. The bulkheads 
and decks had to be strengthened, so as to stand 
the air-pressure. All this was very tedious work, 
particularly that of cutting away the rivets that 
held the funnels in place. Then quantities of coal 
and ammunition were removed, and finally the 
hull was ready to be raised on a cushion of air. 
Not only was air pumped into the hull, but eight 
air cylinders, each seventy feet long and sixteen 
feet in diameter, were lashed to the hull. Every- 
thing worked out according to calculations and at 
last, in the autumn of 1919, the hull, still bottom 



750 



NATURE AND SCIENCE FOR YOUNG FOLK 



751 




Iutcruatioual 



THE "LEONARDO DA VINCI" IN TARANTO HARBOR, RIGHTING ITSELF 



up, was floated and towed into the dry-dock. 
Here repairs were fully completed and the hull 
was made as good as new. 

But then came the problem of turning the hull 
over. Had it been a small boat, it might have 
been turned over by means of cables and steam- 
winches, but the Italian engineers decided to use 
a more ingenious scheme. If water flowing into 
the hull had so unbalanced the vessel that it cap- 
sized, why could n't water again capsize the cap- 
sized hull and turn it right side up? They studied 
the matter with their models of the boat and 
found out just how to do it. By letting the water 
flow into certain compartments, they could make 
the model turn over just as they wanted it to. 
And so the hull of the Leonardo da Vinci was pre- 
pared with proper compartments for air and 
water, and 400 tons of solid ballast were added. 
Finally, on January 24 of this year, the dry-dock 
was flooded and the vessel was towed out to open 
water, where a deep basin had been dredged out. 
The valves were opened to let the sea-water flood 
the compartments, and slowly the vessel began to 
roll over. Then the motion increased, and all 
hands got clear of the ship. The hull righted it- 
self and the momentum carried it far over to the 
opposite side. But there was no fear of its going 
over too far and capsizing again. This had been 
guarded against by placing ballast which gave it 
a list in the opposite direction. 

The spectacle was witnessed by government 
officials from an airship that hovered over the 
vessel and as soon as the hull was righted the 
Italian flag was automatically run up to signalize 
the triumph of the Italian engineers. When the 
vessel was in dry-dock, a motto by the great 
Italian for whom the vessel was named was 



painted in large letters across the deck, and when 
the vessel righted itself spectators read : 

"Ogni torto si dirizza" — "Every wrong rights 
itself." 

A. Russell Bond. 

THE CONSTELLATIONS FOR JUNE 

The two star-groups that occupy the center of 
the celestial stage in mid-latitudes of the northern 
hemisphere during the early evening hours of 
June are Bootes (Bo-o'-tez), called the Hunter, 
although the word means the herdsman or the 
shouter, which will be found overhead at this 
time, and Virgo, the Maiden, largest of the zodi- 
acal constellations, lying nearly due south. 

The gorgeous orange-hued Arcturus in Bootes 
and the beautiful bluish-white Spica, like a dia- 
mond in its sparkling radiance, form with De- 
nebola (De-neb'-o-la), which we identified last 
month, a huge equal-sided triangle that is always 
associated with the spring and early summer 
months. 

To the west of Bootes, below the handle of the 
Big Dipper, is a region where there are few con- 
spicuous stars. Here will be found Canes Venatici 
(the Hunting Dogs with which Bootes is supposed 
to be pursuing the Great Bear around the north 
pole), and, farther south, Coma Berenicis (Bere- 
nice's Hair). 

The brighter of the two Hunting Dogs, which is 
also the brightest star in the entire region covered 
by these two constellations, appears as a beauti- 
ful blue-and-yellow double star in the telescope. 
It was named Cor Caroli (Heart of Charles) by 
the astronomer Halley in honor of Charles II of 
England, at the suggestion of the court physician, 
who imagined it shone more brightly than usual 



752 



NATURE AND SCIENCE FOR YOUNG FOLK 



the night before the return of Charles to London. 
Of more interest to astronomers is the magnifi- 
cent spiral nebula in this constellation, known as 
the "Whirlpool Nebula," appearing as a faint, 
luminous patch in the sky, and of which many 
photographs have been taken with the great tele- 
scopes. This entire region, from Canes Venatici to 



[June 

Northern Crown. It consists of six stars ar- 
ranged in a nearly perfect semicircle, and one 
will have no difficulty in recognizing it. 

Bootes is one of the largest and finest of the 
northern constellations. It can be easily dis- 
tinguished by its peculiar kite-shaped grouping 
of stars or by the conspicuous pentagon (five- 



CANES . 



• VENATICI 



Corona / 
Boreal,* 8ob ^s 



£ coma 

.. BERENICIS 



THE CONSTELLATIONS BOOTES. CANES VENATICI, AND COMA BERENICIS 
THE DIAGRAMS SHOULD BE HELD OVERHEAD, WITH THE LETTER "N" TO THE NORTH TO CORRESPOND TO 
THE POSITIONS OF THE CONSTELLATIONS IN THE HEAVENS CORRESPON » 



Virgo, abounds in faint spiral nebula? that for some 
reason not yet understood by astronomers are 
crowded together in this part of the heavens where 
stars are comparatively few. It is believed that 
there are between five hundred thousand and a 
million of these spiral nebulae in the entire heav- 
ens, and the problem of their nature and origin 
and distance is one that the astronomers are very 
anxious to solve. Many wonderful facts are 
now being learned concerning these faint nebu- 
lous wisps of light which, with few exceptions, are 
observable only with great telescopes, and which 
reveal their spiral structure more clearly to the 
photographic plate than to the human eye. 

Coma Berenicis, south of Canes Venatici and 
southwest of Bootes, is a constellation that con- 
sists of a great number of stars closely crowded 
together, and just barely visible to the unaided 
eye. As a result, it has the appearance of filmy 
threads of light, which doubtless suggested its 
name to the imaginative ancients, who loved to 
fill the heavens with fanciful creations associated 
with their myths and legends. 

This region, so lacking in interesting objects for 
the naked-eye observer, is a mine of riches to the 
fortunate possessors of telescopes; and the great 
telescopes of the world are frequently pointed in 
this direction, exploring the mysteries of space 
that abound here. 

Just to the east of Bootes is the exquisite little 
circlet of stars known as Corona Borealis, the 



sided figure) of stars which it contains. The most 
southerly star in this pentagon is known as Epsilon 
Bootes and is one of the finest double stars in the 
heavens. The two stars of which it consists arc 
respectively orange and greenish-blue in color. 

By far the finest object in Bootes, however, is 
the magnificent Arcturus, which is the brightest 
star in the northern hemisphere of the heavens. 
This star will be conspicuous in the evening hours 
throughout the summer months, as will also the 
less brilliant Spica in Virgo. 

Some recent measurements show that Arcturus 
is one of our nearer neighbors among the stars. 
Its distance is now estimated to be about twenty- 
four light-years. That is, a ray of light from this 
star takes twenty-four years to reach the earth, 
traveling at the rate of one hundred and eighty- 
six thousand miles per second. It is evident that 
such a distance expressed in miles would be be- 
yond our comprehension, and therefore, to express 
the distances of the stars in simple and convenient 
form, the "light-year" was devised, which is the 
distance light travels in a year and which is equiv- 
alent to about six trillion miles. It would seem 
as if we should hardly speak of Arcturus, twenty- 
four light-years away, as a near neighbor, yet 
there are millions of stars that are far more dis- 
tant from the earth, and very few that are nearer 
to us than Arcturus. 

The brightness of Arcturus is estimated to be 
about forty-three times that of the sun. That 



NATURE AND SCIENCE FOR YOUNG FOLK 



1921I 

is, if the two bodies were side by side, Arcturus 
would send forth forty-three times as much light 
and heat as the sun. 

Arcturus is also one of the most rapidly moving 
stars in the heavens. In the past sixteen cen- 
turies it has traveled so far as to have changed its 
position among the other stars by as much as the 
apparent width of the moon. Most of the stars, 
in spite of their motions through the heavens in 
various directions, appear to-day in the same 
relative positions in which they were several thou- 
sand years ago. It is for this reason that the con- 
stellations of the Egyptians and of the Greeks and 
Romans are the same constellations that we see 
in the heavens to-day. Were all the stars as 
rapidly moving as Arcturus, the distinctive forms 
of the constellations would be preserved for only 
a very few centuries. 

Virgo, which lies south and southwest of Bootes, 
is a large, straggling constellation, consisting of a 
Y-shaped configuration of rather inconspicuous 
stars. It lies in the path of our sun, moon, and 
planets, and is, therefor, one of the zodiacal con- 
stellations. The cross in the diagram indicates 
the position of the autumnal equinox, the point 
where the sun crosses the equator going south, 
and the position the sun occupies at the beginning 
of fall. 

Spica, the brightest star in Virgo, is a bluish- 



753 



.VIRGO 

* / 

,* H Spica 



THE CONSTELLATION VIRGO 

white, first-magnitude star standing very much 
alone in the sky. In fact, the Arabs referred to 
this star as "The Solitary One." Its distance 
from the earth is not known, but must be very 
great as it cannot be found by the usual methods. 
The spectroscope shows that it consists of two 
suns, very close together, revolving about a com- 
mon center in a period of only four days. 

Within the branches of the Y in Virgo, and 
just to the north of it, is the wonderful nebulous 
region of this constellation, but it takes a power- 
ful telescope to show the faint spiral nebulae that 
exist here in such profusion. 



Jupiter and Saturn will be visible in Leo 
throughout this month. Jupiter will be very 
conspicuous in the southwest soon after sunset. 
Saturn will be found less than ten degrees east of 
Jupiter. It is now less brilliant than Spica. Venus 
is a morning star this month, and will be a beauti- 
ful object in the eastern sky before sunrise, its dis- 
tance from the sun increasing during the month. 

An excellent opportunity will be afforded for 
one to observe Mercury during the first two weeks 
of June, as it reaches its greatest distance east 
of the sun on June 10. On this date it will be 
less than twenty degrees above the horizon at 
sunset, and southeast of the sun. On account of 
its proximity to the sun, Mercury is the least 
observed of all the brighter planets, though more 
brilliant than most of the first magnitude stars. 

There is a possibility that a periodic comet, 
known as the Pons-Winnecke comet, may pass 
near the earth the last of June, and there may be 
an unusual meteoric display at the time. This 
comet is due to arrive this summer, but the exact 
date of its visit is uncertain. 

Isabel M. Lewis. 

PROPELLING A BOAT WITH PUMPS 

Those readers of St. Nicholas who have been 
studying physics will recall Newton's third law, 
which states that "To every action there is op-' 
posed an equal and opposite reaction." Those 
who have never heard of this law, or who have 
forgotten it, will need a word of explanation. 

In the first place, you cannot move any object 
without having something to push against. You 
cannot even move yourself without pushing 
against something. When you push a cart along 
the street, your feet are pushing in the opposite 
direction against the pavement. The second 
point to consider is that the push against the cart 
is exactly equal to the push against the ground. 
If the cart were heavy and the ground were slip- 
pery, your feet would slip out from under you and 
the cart would stand still, and yet the push against 
the cart would exactly equal the push against the 
slippery ground. 

When you fire a rifle, the powder gases push the 
bullet in one direction and the rifle in the opposite 
direction. The "kick" of the rifle is due to the 
backward push of the powder gases, and we call 
this "kick" the reaction. The push against the 
bullet is exactly equal to the reaction of the rifle; 
but because the rifle is heavy and the bullet is 
light, the velocity of the bullet is very great com- 
pared with the backward velocity of the rifle. 
Even if there were no bullet in the gun, the pow- 
der gases would make the gun kick, because they 
could not get out of the gun-barrel without push- 
ing back against the breech-block of the gun. 



754 



NATURE AND SCIENCE FOR YOUNG FOLK 



Some people think that the kick of a blank charge 
is due to the pressure of the powder against the 
air, but that is not so; the kick would be exactly 
the same if the gun were fired in a vacuum. 

Firemen have a lot of trouble handling the 
hose when they are directing a high-pressure 
stream of water upon a fire. The water will not 




THE WATER-DRIVEN BOAT. INSET SHOWS INFLOWING AND OUTFLOWING STREAMS 



run out of the hose without pushing against some- 
thing. If the hose runs ii. a straight line from the 
hydrant, the push is exerted against the hydrant. 
Of course, the water presses against the walls of 
the hose too, but the pressure is equal in all direc- 
tions and we need n't stop to consider it. But if 
the hose is bent, we feel the reaction immediately. 
The water will not change its direction without 
pushing against something, and in this case it is the 
hose it pushes against. A similar example of re- 
action is furnished when you run around a corner. 
You have to push yourself around with your feet, 
and if your footing is not good enough, your feet 
will slip and you will not be able to make the turn. 
So every change of direction results in reaction, 



[June 

and the reaction of a stream in a bent hose may 
be so great that two or three firemen must use all 
their strength to control the wriggling hose. 

Two hundred years ago, long before the first 
steamboat was built, an inventor suggested that a 
boat might be propelled by pumping a jet of water 
out of the stern, but the matter was not taken 
seriously. Fifty-five 
years ago, an 1160-ton 
boat with water-jet pro- 
pulsion was actually built 
by the British Admiralty, 
but it did not prove effi- 
cient. Then, in 1 88 1, two 
small boats were built, 
one driven by a common 
propeller and the other 
by a water-jet. The 
propeller-driven boat 
made 17.6 knots and the 
water-jet boat only 12.6. 
This was rather discour- 
aging, and jet propulsion 
was dropped as imprac- 
ticable. It is interesting 
to note that the boat 
would have made just as 
good progress had the jet 
been discharged in the 
open air instead of under 
water. In fact, the re- 
action would have been 
no greater had the jet 
discharged against a 
stone wall, and no less 
had the jet discharged 
into a vacuum. 

The failure of the boat 
was due to a number of 
secondary causes; there 
was nothing wrong with 
the principle of jet pro- 
pulsion, and so, from 



time to time, inventors have revived it. 

Recently, a water-driven boat which looks like 
a real success has been constructed in England. 
It does as well as a propeller-driven boat of the 
same size and engine power and has certain ad- 
vantages not possessed by other boats. The boat 
is really only a launch, twenty-four feet long and 
weighing two and a half tons. The power-plant 
consists of a 7f horse-power engine and a pair of 
centrifugal pumps. Each pump consists of a 
drum in which an impeller is mounted to turn. 
The impeller is just like a four-bladed paddle- 
wheel, but it does not fit the drum closely. 
There is plenty of clearance all around the blades. 
The drums project through the hull of the boat 



NATURE AND SCIENCE FOR YOUNG FOLK 



755 



and are covered over by casings that look like 
paddle-boxes. Each drum has two inflow open- 
ings, one at each side, and an outflow opening at 
the bottom and toward the rear. Water comes 
into the drum through the inflow openings and is 
carried around the drum by the blades of the im- 
peller, only to be hurled out toward the stern of 
the boat. The outflowing stream passes between 
the two legs of the inflowing water, as shown in 
the inset of our picture. 

The reaction produced by the outflowing stream 
is what drives the boat forward. Now the drums 
can be turned within the casings, so as to change 
the direction of the outflowing stream. In fact, 
they can be turned so far that the stream of water 
is actually directed forward, reversing the direc- 
tion of the boat. The drums may be turned 
separately, so as to steer the boat or turn it 
around as if on a pivot. All the while the engine 
and the impeller will be running continuously in 
the same direction. The drums can be turned 
rearwardly so far that the outflow openings are 
completely covered by the casing. Then all the 
impellers do is to churn the water in the drums, 
and there is no reaction that propels the boat. 
The drumsare moved by a couple of hand levers 
and may be locked in any position by means of 
ratchets, one of which is shown in our drawing. 
This makes a very simple and flexible means of 
control, and the pilot need not bother with the 
engine, once it is started. He can turn this way 
and that, run fast or slow, or reverse, merely by 
working the levers. 

One of the mistakes of previous water-propelled 
boats has been that they used small jets of water 
of very high velocity. It is quantity of water, 
rather than velocity, that counts. In this boat, 
the stream of water delivered by each pump is 
twenty-four inches square in cross-section, and 
about 9^ tons of water are discharged per minute. 

The speed of the boat is 5.6 knots, which is just 
about the same as the speed at which a screw- 
propeller would drive the boat with an engine of 
the same horse-power. The boat draws only 
seventeen inches, and so can travel in very shal- 
low water. It can be used in streams or lakes 
filled with weeds, where a propeller could not be 
used without becoming badly tangled. 

A. Russell Bond. 

THE BOHEMIAN WAXWINGS 

One day we went to visit Mr. W. A. Eliot and 
were talking about different birds common 
around Portland, Oregon, and of one or two rare 
kinds which were reported near the city. 

Suddenly the telephone bell rang, and in a few 
minutes, Mr. Eliot said that a flock of these 



birds, the Bohemian waxwings,. were then up on 
Council Crest, a hill overlooking the city. 

We immediately started off to see them. As 
we left the car and walked along, we sighted them 
in a tree near by. We watched them until they 
flew farther up the hill, and we had to make a 
wide detour to see them again. Then we watched 
them bathing and eating rose-haws and holly- 
berries. 

The way they ate the large rose-haws was in- 
teresting. These were too big for them to swallow 




BOHEMIAN WAXWINGS 



whole, so they tried to peck them to pieces. 
Their beaks were not strong enough to do this, 
so they tried to swallow them anyhow. Some- 
times a bird would fly up with one in his mouth, 
but he always dropped it and went to another, 
sometimes larger and sometimes smaller than the 
last, but invariably with the same result. 

The waxwings are so called because of the red- 
tipped secondaries (wing-feathers) which look as 
though they had been dipped in red sealing-wax. 

The Bohemian waxwing is larger than the 
ordinary cedar waxwing and is a natural resident 
in the high mountains and in the far north. It 
has a bright brown mask, a black band through 
the eye, a black chin, bright yellow-and-white 
wing patches, and a broad yellow band on the tail. 
R. Bruce Horsfall, Jr. (age 12). 



THE TIPTOE-TWINS' PRIZE-WINNERS 




5. WHEN THEY RE INVITED OUT TO TEA C. THEIR MANNERS ARE MOST SAD TO SEE! 



756 



FOR VERY LITTLE FOLK 




11. WHERE EACH IS JUDGED A FIRST-PRIZE PIC. 12. THEN BOTH TROT HOMEWARD, JIGGLETY-JIG. 




ST. NICHOLAS LEAGUE 



"A HEADING FOR JUNE." BY JEAN PATTISON, AGE 13 
(SILVER BADGE) 

This, dear St. Nicholas League, is the very last contribu- 
tion I can ever make to your pages, for in two more days I shall 
have reached the age limit! 

Before I go I want to thank you for all the pleasures you 
have given me. and, yes, for all the disappointments, too! 

I wish I could do something to show how much I love you, 
but that seems impossible. But I am going to make you a 
promise: I am going some day, some how, to make the League 
proud of me. Your ever-loving member, 

Helen Elmira Waite. 

Dear St. Nicholas League: You cannot even estimate my 
pride in possessing my silver badge, for I have been striving for 
recognition in the League for the past ten years! How well I 
remember my first, six-year-old, smudgy contribution! My 
writing — or rather my printing — was at that early date quite 
illegible, I fear. But while eleven years have elapsed since my 
initial contribution to the League, my enthusiasm for and en- 
joyment in the League have never lagged; and although at 
present I am in college, and have but little time for anything 
else but work, I still find a few minutes now and then in which 
hurriedly to make a contribution for "St. Nick." You see I 



have but a few more months in which to try for a gold badge, 
and I shall be eighteen next birthday (in December). 

Thanking you again and again for the charming badge, which 
I shall continually wear with pride and pleasure, I am, 
Your sincere friend, 

Selma Morse. 

Dear St. Nicholas League: I have received the lovely silver 
badge for a poem I wrote in the March League competition, 
Thank you very much for it. 

The badge means a lot to me, as it represents an organization 
that, I am sure, is doing a great deal to advance and stimulate 
interest in culture among young people. I appreciate, more 
than I can tell, everything that membership in the League has 
done for me. Writing for the contests has made me think and 
has broadened my outlook on life and nature. 

I only regret that in a very short time I shall be eighteen 
years of age and can then be a League member no longerl I 
used to think that all the happiness in the world would be mine 
at the independent age of eighteen; but I now actually look 
forward with some apprehension to my next birthday! 

I thank you again for the badge and for the opportunities and 
advancement it represents. 

Yours very sincerely, 

Rudolph Cook. 

By placing its age-limit at eighteen, the League has, in 
truth, caused the birthday for that year to take on quite 
a tragic aspect ! We receive many letters to this effect 
as the fatal date draws near for one member after 
another. But our young friends must remember that 
they can graduate into the main pages of the magazine 
itself — and of many other magazines! "The world is 
all before them where to choose"; and St. Nicholas 
and their fellow-members will watch their progress with 
the special interest of old-time comrades. 

The League is proud of these letters, which show 
how well — in the familiar phrase — "we are advertised 
by our loving friends." And, in all modesty, St. 
Nicholas may indeed take just and lasting pride in an 
organization that can inspire such sentiments and loy- 
alty in the hearts of American boys and girls. 



PRIZE COMPETITION No. 255 

(In making awards contributors' ages are considered) 
PROSE. Gold Badges, Evelyn Perkins (age 12), Connecticut; Jeanne Hugo (age 16), Minnesota; Florence 
Beaujean (age 14), New York. Silver Badges, Marjorie C. Baker (age 12), Colorado; Alice Sherwood (age 
13), Ind.; KathrynL. Oliver (age 16), Calif. ; Edwin Peterson (age 15), Minn. ; Violet Whelen (age 13), D. C. 
VERSE. Gold Badge, Helen R. Norsworthy (age 17), Canada. Silver Badge, Max Goodley (age 17), Ky" 
DRAWINGS. Gold Badges, Harriette McLeod (age 16), Mich. ; Bernard S. Sheridan (age 17) Ohio Silver 
Badges, Jean Pattison (age 13), N. Y.; Mary Palmateer (age 12), Mass.; Margaret Westoby (age 13), Can. 
PHOTOGRAPHS. Gold Badges, Margaret Scoggin (age 15), Missouri; Jane F. Kirk (age 15) Pennsyl- 
vania Silver Badges, Eunice C. Resor (age 16), Ohio; Mary Scattergood (age 13), Pennsylvania; Minnie 
G. Palmer (age 14), New York; Mary F. Thomson (age 15), Ohio; Natica Nast (age 16), New York. 
PUZZLE-MAKING. Silver Badges, Elizabeth Barton (age 17), New York; Lael Tucker (age 11) Louis- 
iana; Betty Dering (age 11), Wisconsin; Alice Wilkins (age io), California. 




BY JESSICA W. HOLTON, AGE 12 



BY MARY SCATTERGOOD, AGE 13. (SILVER BADGE) 



'CAUGHT BY THE CAMERA' 

7S8 



ST. NICHOLAS LEAGUE 



759 



JUST IN TIME 
(A True Story) 

BY MARJORIE C. BAKER (AGE 12) 

(Silver Badge) 

Saturday night, Mother and I went to the Auditorium 
to see Pavlovva. We got out quite late. Mother and I 
were all alone in our new car. It is a closed one. We 
were going down Logan Street, which was very dark. 
All of a sudden we heard a man yell at us. He said, 
"Pull over to the curb and stop!" Mother at first 
thought it was a policeman; but she looked around and 
saw a man jump from a car and point a gun at us. She 
knew that no policeman would point a gun at a woman 
and a little girl, so she put on full speed, and the man 
could n't jump on our running-board. 

Our car has a wonderful pick-up, and we got away for 
the time being. They followed close behind us, without 
any lights on. Mother drove as fast as she could with- 
out tipping the car over. She drove up in front of our 
house and honked the horn loudly. Daddy came out 
just in time to see the men race up Second Avenue after 
us. But we had n't gone that way; we had turned off 
of Second Avenue just in time to escape them. Daddy 
"phoned Headquarters right away. Some policemen 
caught the men after a long chase. 

I certainly think we got home just in time, don't you? 

IN A ROSE GARDEN 

BY HELEN A. NORSWORTHY (AGE 1 7) 

(Cold Badge. Silver Badge won September, 1920) 
In the witching, mist-hung moonlight soft, I slipped 

along the grass 
To a stone-walled, dew-wet garden where the pale- 

hued roses mass — ■ 
Where the fountain's thread of silver lifts and sways as 

breezes pass. 

Dreamed I there, in swimming fragrance, of a myriad 
roses poured 

On the cool night air, like incense to some mystic 

Eastern lord — 
Came a sound of footsteps falling, faint as rain upon 

the sward. 

Footsteps, and a silken rustle — lo! with dainty old- 
time grace, 

Came a lady lightly toward me, quaintly clad and fair 
of face; 

And a courtly lord trod after, brave in uniform and 
lace. 

All unheeding of my presence, soft they wandered to 
and fro 

On the blossom-bordered pathways that they loved so 
long ago; 

And the fountain echoed back their silver laughter, 
sweet and low. 

Softly fell the moon-rays round them, clothed them in a 

gleaming light; 
On the silken gown they shimmered, on the powdered 

wigs of white, 

On the heavy-perfumed flowers, on the saber polished 
bright. 

Swift she stooped and plucked a rosebud; smiling, gave 

it; and I knew 
That an old-time lord and lady to their plighted troth 

were true. 

And their shades still loved to wander 'mid the roses, 
wet with dew. 



When the pale, uncertain moonlight silvers lawns and 

woods and seas. 
When the sleeping roses yield their heavy perfume to 

the breeze — 

Think you not that far, faint stirring is the sighing of 
the trees; 

'T is the footsteps of the shades returning from some 

long-dead June, 
To wander where the lichened fountain tinkles still its 

tune, 

While full-blown roses drop their gleaming petals 
'neath the moon. 




(silver badge) 
JUST IN TIME 

BY C. LILLIS LELAND (AGE 1 5) 

(Honor Member) 
In a deep, cushioned arm-chair before the fireplace sat a 
stately, dark-haired maiden, her dreamy gaze fixed on 
the glowing embers before her. She seemed to be think- 
ing deeply. 

Suddenly a slight shudder shook her whole frame, and 
her face took on a curious expression, half of fear, half of 
anticipation, as if she were struggling against some 
strong emotion within her. It took her but a moment 
to decide what course to pursue. This was the crucial 
moment — it was "now or never!" If she did not fore- 
stall that — But she must, she must! 

In less time than it takes to tell it, she had sprung to 
her feet, darted across the room, seized her muff from 
the table where it lay, and was fumbling within it fev- 
erishly. There was not a moment to lose! Every 
second counted ! 

Just as it seemed that she would never find what she 
sought, and as the emotion was becoming more over- 
powering than ever, she drew forth triumphantly some- 
thing soft and white. 

Xhen — "Kerchoo-o-o-o-o!!" Ah! She had found her 
handkerchief just in time! 

JUST IN TIME 

BY ELISABETH COPE (AGE 1 2) 

In 1862, during the Civil War, the Confederates changed 
the old partly burned steamer Merrimac into an iron- 
clad monster carrying fifteen guns. 

On March 8, the Merrimac came out of Norfolk and 
steamed to the vessels of the Union blockade, at Hamp- 
ton Roads. The sailors laughed at the Merrimac. But 



760 



ST. NICHOLAS LEAGUE 




HEADING FOR JUNE." BY MARY PALMATEER, AGE 12 
(SILVER BADGE) 

great was the fright when the Merrimac, without bein<* 
injured by the bullets fired at it, fired a broadside into 
the Cumberland and sank it. The news was soon tele- 
graphed over the United States. All hope for the North 
was given up. for what could stop this terrible monster 
from destroying all the fine wooden ships of the time. 

All day the Merrimac wrought havoc, but by night 
before finishing her career of destruction, she returned 
to Norfolk. 

That night the Monitor arrived at Hampton Roads 
The Monitor had been built by John Ericsson, and had 
come down at the critical moment. 

The next day, Sunday, the two ironclads fought a 
battle. The commander of the Monitor, being slightly 
blinded by burning powder, withdrew the Monitor 
Neither vessel won, but the Monitor came just in time 
to save the Northern cause. 

JUST IN TIME 

BY EVELYN PERKINS (AGE 1 2) 

{Gold Badge. Silver Badge won August, 1020) 
The noonday sun beat down upon the rolling pastures 
of Palestine, one day long ago. Standing alone on a 
grassy hilltop was a young boy gazing over the mead- 
ows. The cool breeze brushed back the dark locks from 
his forehead, the sunlight glistened in his clear, dark 
eyes. His strong, handsome body was wrapped in a 
sheepskin; and a harp was slung over his shoulder It 
was David, herding his father's flocks. 

Turning, he went to a shady nook under an olive-tree 
and began to play upon his harp. There was no sound 
save the breeze as it trembled in the olive-tree overhead 
and the mellow notes of the harp as Davids fingers 
wandered idly over the strings. 

Suddenly, there was a cry on the other side of the little 




[June 

hill and several frightened sheep came bounding toward 
David. Laying down his harp, he mounted the hill and 
saw two sheep cowering beneath a thorn-bush An- 
preaching them, stealthily, was a dark wolf, his head 
lowered, teeth set, uttering a low growl. David placed 
a pebble in his sling, there was a singing twang, and 
the missle whistled through the air, hit the wolfs flank 
with a stinging pain, and bounced off. With a yelp of 
pain the wolf sprang forward, growling, and, with his 
fore feet on the sheep, lowered his head to tear it to 
pieces. But David sprang toward him ; and pinning him 
to the ground with his staff, he struck the fierce creature 
a fatal blow on the head. 

When the sun was sinking behind the hills, David 
started homeward, the dead wolf thrown over his 
shoulder, his flocks bounding after him. But he never 
forgot the day when he had been just in time to save his 
sheep. 




MY FAVORITE SPORT. " BY HARRIETTS MCLEOD, AGE 16. 

BADGE. SILVER BADGE WON JANUARY, I921) 



(GOLD 



CAUGHT BY THE CAMERA." BY NATICA NAST, AGE 16 
(SILVER BADGE) 

THE ROSE 

BY JOHN IRVING DANIEL (AGE 1 7) 

{Honor Member) 
Thin pressed between the pages old and worn — 

A crisp and withered rose. My fancies leap 
To my lost sweetheart, who, one fair June morn. 
From her dear hand gave me that bud to keep. 
The blood drawn from her dainty finger when 

She plucked the rose, then sealed our hearts in love. 
The tender kiss seemed as a soft amen 

To me; perfection reigned, as heav'n above. 

This dream, inspired by withered flower's scent, 
Reveals a love whose radiant angel face 

Appears as though by Time's dark caverns lent, 
My heart to lift and decades to erase. 

But then, yes, even as the phantom grows, 
It fades; I see naught but a withered rose. 

JUST IN TIME 

BY ALICE SHERWOOD (AGE 13) 

{Silver Badge) 

"Just in Time." When I think of that subject, there 
are many incidents that come to my mind, but one that 
I think of first is the Battle of Waterloo. 

How it was fought on June 18, 1815, near Waterloo 
about ten miles from Brussels. 

How the British commander, Wellington, had fallen 
back toward Waterloo, and the Prussians under Blilcher 
had been defeated at Ligny. 



1Q2I] 



ST. NICHOLAS LEAGUE 



761 







BY EVELYN SHEPHERD, AGE II 



BY GLADYS M. HURD, AGE 14 

'CAUGHT BY THE CAMERA' 



BY EUNICE C. RESOR, AGE l6 
(SILVER BADGE) 



The British army was in the shape of a curve with the 
center nearest the enemy. Wellington desired only to 
hold this position until Blucher and his troops, who 
were some ten miles away, arrived. 

The opposing armies had about seventy thousand 
men each, Napoleon's men being war-worn veterans, 
while Wellington's men were mostly untrained Belgians, 
Brunswickers, Hanoverians, and English. 

The French army kept in the lead all the afternoon 
by brilliant, but costly, cavalry charges. 

By nightfall, when both armies were exhausted, 
Blucher arrived with reinforcements just in time to save 
the day. The battle turned against the French. Na- 
poleon, in a last desperate effort, launched the famous 
"Old Guard," against the enemy. This failed, and the 
allied army advanced in a bayonet charge. The French 
were soon in retreat. 

This battle had the effect of removing forever from 
Europe Napoleon, with his great military genius and 
boundless ambition. 

What if Blucher and his troops had not arrived when 
they did? We do not know what the outcome would 
have been; but as long as he did come, we need not 
worry about it. 

JUST IN TIME 

BY KATHRYN LOUISE OLIVER (AGE 1 6) 

(Silver Badge) 

Los Angeles, California. 

"Buddy" dear: 

I know you are interested in the achievements of 
Jack (whom, you will remember, I regard as the eighth 
wonder of the world), so "Listen, my child, and you shall 
hear." 

It happened in this wise: the championship (foot-ball) 
game had reached the last quarter of the last half, no 
one "knocked out" seriously, score seven to seven, and 
everybody's hair standing on end with excitement, for 
our men had fought their way down toward our goal 
and only had three more yards to make before the 
touchdown that would "put us on the map." You can 
imagine how tense we all were — every one leaning over 
every one else in their eagerness to see, and the "rooters" 



for the others shrieking frantically to their men, "Hold 
that line!" 

At that moment the men untangled themselves from 
the last scrimmage (I don't see how they know which 
leg belongs to which!), and there Jack lay, all white, 
and — apparently — ruined for life. You can imagine my 
feelings! He never, on any similar occasion had looked 
so frightfully long and limp, and I was petrified with 
fear. 

It seemed centuries before he stirred, sat up, was 
helped to his feet, where he stood, swaying dizzily, — 
looking ready to collapse at the slightest touch. I knew 
that he had been hurt badly, but he pulled himself to- 
gether, dashed into the game, caught a forward pass, 
streaked across the line, and fell, unconscious again, 
just as the referee called, "Time"! 

Of course the crowd went wild and he was the hero 
of the hour, though he was n't conscious much of the 
time to appreciate it. 

And proud? I was perfectly insufferable! 
Yours ever, 

"Slim." 




"CAUGHT BY THE CAMERA." BY ELIZABETH D. LEVERS, AGE IS 



762 



ST. NICHOLAS LEAGUE 




"A HEADING FOR JUNE." BY MARGARET WESTOBY, AGE 13 
(SILVER BADGE) 

IN A ROSE GARDEN 

BY FRANCES MALLORY (AGE 1 5) 

(Honor Member) 
I opened up a casket small. 

A faded fan there met my sight, 
And to my bended head arose 

A fragrance exquisite. 

As I stood there, my soul was borne 

Through ages past, so far away; 
I wandered in a garden fair 

At dusky twilight, close of day. 
The air was freshly damp and warm; 

The insects buzzed about my head ; 
An odor sweet and heavy rose 

From every flower-bed. ' • 

From roses lifting up their heads 

To catch the evening dew — 
Sweet roses, shining through the dusk 

With every lovely hue: 
Pink as the dawn.'pure white as snow', 

A deep blood-red, and yellow- 
gold — 

The perfume of those flowers fair 
Came from that garden old. 

From out my dream I slowly came, 

Back from that distant land. 
A dozen petals from a rose 

Were resting in my hand. 




"my favorite sport." by otho blake 
age 17. (honor member) 



JUST IN TIME 

BY JEANNE HUGO (AGE 16) 

(Gold Badge. Silver Badge won November, ioiq) 
As the interurban street-car stopped at a small suburb a 
man came rushing down the street like a whirlwind, 
with the tails of his coat waving in the breeze and his 
hat threatening to fly off at any moment. The con- 
ductor was in the act of giving the signal to start when 
the man yelled at him, came dashing into the car, and 
flopped exhausted into a seat. 



[June 

"Well," he said when he had got his breath, "I was 
just in time, was n't I?" The conductor grinned and 
replied, "It was a close call, all right." As he said the 
last word, the car gave a sickening lurch and stopped 
Some one who was looking out of the window an- 
nounced, "It 's off the track." 

"Oh!" groaned the man, "now I am in a nice mess. 
The wedding begins in five minutes. A case of being 
just in time to be late, I should say." 

It was fully twenty minutes before the car was again 
on the track. Those were excruciating moments for our 
hero. He twisted about, bit his lips, tried not to think 
of the wedding, and was altogether miserable. The car 
finally started again and the man got off at the next 
suburb just in time to see the bride and groom get into 
an auto and go speeding down the street, followed by the 
good wishes of their friends. 

"Well, my dears," he.said, as he threw a handful' of 
rice after the departing pair, "you caught each other 
just in time" (neither was very young) "and here 's 
hoping that as you journey through life together you 
may never get off the track!" 



A ROSE 

BY MAX GOODLEY (AGE 1 7) 

(Silver Badge) 
Down a little winding roadside, 
Filled with flowers of every color, 
Where the wild birds are a-calling 
And the sun shines through the day, 
Blooms one flower most entrancing, 
Filling every breeze with fragrance 
From its nodding, swaying blossoms 
From its heart of purest gold. 

On its dewy-laden petals, 
Sparkling in the summer sunlight, 
Butterflies of rainbow brightness 
Rest and sip the sweetness there. 
While deep-sheltered in its green 
leaves 

Hidden, swaying with the breezes, 
Lives a nest of baby birdies 
Cooing softly to themselves. 

Growing, breathing in the sunlight, 
With its wild and simple beauty — 
Petals of a faint pink color. 
Gleaming under skies of blue — 
Filling all the world with brightness, 
Adding cheer to the waj'farers — 
To all this, there is one answer: 
For this flower is a wild rose. 

JUST IN TIME 

BY FLORENCE BEAUJEAN (AGE 14) 

(Gold Badge. Silver Badge won 
January, 1020) 
The outlook directly after the Rev- 
olutionary War was not very promising for our new 
republic. During the war, the people had been united 
by common danger, but now that there was no fear, they 
were rapidly drifting apart. 

This condition was due to the poor form of govern- 
ment of that time under the Articles of Confederation. 
The articles contained many flaws, the main one being 
that it provided for no executive body to enforce the 
laws. The national government had almost no power, 
while that of the state possessed much. Instead of 
feeling as brothers toward each other, the people of one 



1921] 



ST. NICHOLAS LEAGUE 



763 



state became enemies of those in another state. Some 
one has likened the union at this time to a barrel having 
no hoops. As there was nothing to hold the union to- 
gether, it was falling apart, and thirteen foreign coun- 
tries, each having selfish notions of its own, with no re- 
gard for others, were being formed. 

The leaders of the country, seeing that something 
must be done to preserve the union, called a convention 
at Annapolis of delegates from all the states. As only 
five states were represented, the plan was abandoned 
until fall, when another convention, at which most of 
the states were represented, met at Philadelphia. 

After much debate, it was decided to plan a new form 
of government. The Constitution, under which we 
to-day are governed, was the production of this con- 
vention. 

It was submitted to the states for ratification. Many 
were opposed to it, but finally it was ratified by all in 
1787. As every one familiar with American history 
knows, the Constitution contains none of the defects of 
the former government, and soon, with Washington as 
our President, we were a happy and united people. 
It may be truly said that the Constitution came "just 
in time." 

JUST IN TIME 

BY EDWIN PETERSON (AGE 1 5) 

(Silver Badge) 

The Seventy-seventh Division, U. S. Marines, was en- 
tirely surrounded by the Germans. The Argonne woods 
were infested by machine-guns. Shells whizzed, boomed, 
crashed. It was the fifth day that the 77th Division had 
been shut in, but still Major Whittlesey refused to sur- 
render. It was five days since the battalion had tasted 
food or water, except small morsels of emergency ra- 
tions, or had had an hour's uninterrupted rest. 

Cher Ami was a carrier-pigeon, the company's mas- 
cot. He had been forgotten in the midst of dying 
soldiers, in the midst of shot and shell, in the midst of 
intense suffering on every side. 



A soldier, looking for his kit, came across the cage in 
which Cher Ami was huddled in a corner, half dead with 
fright and hunger. He was sent out with a message. 
No sooner had the bird left the hands of the liberator, 
than one of its legs was shot off. The bird fluttered, 
started to fall, recovered itself, and flew on valiantly. 




"CAUGHT BY THE CAMERA." BY MARGARET SCOGGIN, AGE 15 
(GOLD BADGE. SILVER BADGE WON MAY, 1919) 

Only one thing was calling him onward— home, home; 
to Cher Ami the one thought was home. 

A live mass of feathers, soggy with blood, fell into the 
hands of an orderly. It was Cher Ami, delivering the 
precious message. It was through this message that a 
detachment of soldiers was able to rescue what remained 
of the Lost Battalion. One hundred and ninety-four 
starved, crazed, and wounded heroes that had been 
without food, water, rest, sleep, shelter, or medical 
treatment for nearly six days, were saved through a 
faithful pigeon! 

This touching tale of a little bird bringing succor to 
the remainder of the Lost Battalion, "just in time" to 
save it from annihilation that seemed inevitable, will 
live in song and story for generations to come. 





BY MARY LESLIE, AGE 15 



BY JANE F. KIRK, AGE 15- (GOLD BADGE. 
SILVER BADGE WON DECEMBER, 1920) 




BY CARLOTA HEIDE, AGE 12 



'CAUGHT BY THE CAMERA" 



764 



ST. NICHOLAS LEAGUE 



[June 




"MY FAVORITE SPORT." BY BERNARD S. SHERIDAN, AGE 17. 
(GOLD BADGE. SILVER BADGE WON OCTOBER, IQIO) 

JUST IN TIME 
BY VIOLET WHELEN (AGE 13) 
(Silver Badge) 

A bright ray of sunshine flashed through the hospital 
windo\* and lighted upon the pallid face of a young 
soldier. A doctor and a white-capped nurse were bend- 
ing over him with anxious faces. Finally, the doctor 
straightened up and glanced at the nurse. 

"If the general does not hurry, it will hardly be here 
in time," was all he said, as he passed on to the next 
bed. 

The "it" which the doctor spoke of was the Victoria 
Cross. The young soldier who lay dying had won it by 
a glorious service; but there had been some unaccount- 
able delay in presenting it to him. He knew he was to 
receive it, his general had been there the day before, had 
praised him for his brave deed, and told him of the 
great reward that was coming to him. Now he was 
past recovery and was slowly slipping away. His only 
wish was that he might have one look at that glorious 
medal as it lay pinned upon his breast. 

The day passed, and still no word from the general. 
The room was filled with the glow of an autumnal 
sunset. Suddenly, the door opened and three officers 
appeared and advanced to where the soldier lay. The 
foremost bore the insignia of a field marshal. As he 
bent over the bed, his strong dark features were strik- 
ingly outlined against the dying splendor of the sunset 
as it poured through the window. But the soldier felt 
only, with a thrill of happiness, the weight of the tiny 
piece of bronze pinned to his shirt,, and the firm hand- 
grasp of the great soldier whom all England honored. 




JUST IN TIME • 

BY RUTH KENNEY (AGE 9) 

In a coal-mine near Wilkes-Barre a story is told of how 
a band of rats saved some miners' lives. The miners 
would feed the rats, for they knew that, while the rats 
were in the mine, the mine was safe. 

One day, the miners noticed that the rats were run- 
ning toward the slope; then they picked up their dinner- 
cans, and followed the rats. 

A few minutes after, the mine caved in. The men 
had left the mine just in time. 

SPECIAL MENTION 

permitted' tH ° Se Wh ° S6 W ° rk W ° U ' d haV ° been used llad spacc 



PROSE 

Valentine Eskenazi 
Mary A. Holbrook 
Dorothy R. Burnett 
Ronald M. Straus 
Dorothy Pond 
Elizabeth L. 

Thompson 
Joan Knight 
Margaret McCoy 
Betty Ellison 
Dorothy Trautwein 
Eleanor 

Frothingham 
Nellie Van Orsdall 
Nance Nieman 
Jeanette Nathan 
Esther Gilkin 
Rosemary P. Brewer 
Edward T. Horn 
Elizabeth Sussman 
Elizabeth Leete 
Glanville Downey 
Eleanor P. Vail 
Pauline Crockett 
Florence Finch 
Silvia A. 

Wunderlich 
Margaret A. 

Hamilton 
Irma Tillman 
Annie M. Young 
Rosamond Gardner 
Sarah Shiras 
Dorothy E. Snow 
Shirley While 
Lois Mills 
Wilhelmina Rankin 
Elizabeth T. Roberts 
Arthur Bissell, Jr. 
Carl Eardley 
Mildred Elpes 
Carol H. Hanigan 
Margaret Hoening 



Henrielte Dollz 
Louis Cohen 
Barbara Blech 
Harriott Churchill 
Katherine Wood 
Margaret Waring 

VERSE 
Margaret Humphrey 
Margaret MacPrang 
Caroline Rankin 
Betty Brown 
Aline Fruhanf 
Katherine Foss 
Louise Steuarl 
Elizabeth Brooks 
Margaret S. Terry 
Helen Preston 

Powell 
Malvina Holcomp 

Mary Page 
Bradshaw 

Angelica S. Gibbs 

Eva Louise 
Hourwich 

Josephine Rankin 

Dorothy Wilmerding 

Nina Micheles 

Helen B. 
Monkhouse 
DRAWINGS 

Worthen Bradley 

Isabelle Haskell 

C. F. Mielkr 

Francis Harold 

Lucille Murphy 

Adelaide Noska 

Meredith A. Scott 

Amy Tatro 

Grace Hays 

Edith Barnes 

Teresa R. Rankin 

Mary S. Bryan 

Francis Martin 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

Frances W. Coppag 
Henrietta Sleinkd - 
Dorothy Eshleman 
Henry Kirby-Smith 
A nna Marie 

Mike sell 
Marcella Prughl 
Rachel Hammond 
Norman Kasller 
Gladys R. Hall 
Ruth Baker 
Jean Hunter 
Lillian Ridenour 
F.lizabelh McKinney 
Elizabeth Lovell 
Frederick M. 

Leonard 
Elizabeth Nash 
Douglas Anderson 
Elizabeth Farthing 
Elizabeth Gregory 
Katharine Nash 
Anne Parsons 
Mary C. Thompson 
Sallie Ford 
Grace Rarig 
Madeleine Edwards 
Joseph N. Ulman, 
Jr. 

John Cowles 
Helen Furst 
Rafael R. Peyre 
Marion B. Simonds 
Anita C. Grew 
Elizabeth Stuart 
E. H. Cassatl 
John H . Rowe 
Caroline Harris 
Frances Robbins 
Thomas Grandin 



ROLL OF HONOR 

A list of those whose contributions were deserving of hieh 
praise: 



CAUGHI BY ThE CAMERA. BY MARY F. THOMSON, AGE 15 
(SILVER BADGE) 



PROSE 
Grace H. Glover 
Catherine M. 

Seiberling 
Marian Grant 
Minnie Pfeferberg 
Virginia 

Weyerhaeuser 
Frances P. Davis 
Evelyn Richards 
Marie Louise 

Hornsby 
Mary Helen 

Warden 
Helen Brossman 
Lillian Drescher 
Thomas B. 

Matthews 
Louise E. 

Baldwin 
Marilla Hayes 
Margaret E. Little 
Susan Hall 



Monica A. Harnden 
Meyer Lisbanoff 
Philena Weller 
Margaret Gott 
Celeste K. Proctor 
Grace Mulholland 
Mary Elliot 
Janet L. Bullitt 
Jean Maisonville 
Jane N. Gotten 
Eunice Clark 
Alice De Lancey 

Parker 
Carol McNeely 
John Deschenes 
Willie Eitzen 
Ruth Neumann 
O. P. Metcalf, Jr. 
Anne J. Davenport 
Nancy M. Pinkley 
Norma P. Ruedi " 
Winifred B. Tooze 
Regina Wiley 



Barbara D. Simison 
Dorothy DeGraff 
Edith E. Kearney 
Joyce W. Nye 
Mary Neal 

Childress 
Mary Swornstedt 
Nannette 

Robertson 
Virginia Walles 

Butler 
Sara Hayden 
Hilda M. Abel 
Harriet T. Mason 
Mary Clark 
Elizabeth Warren 
Allen Mills 
Edith Olline 
Eleanor Collins 
Katharine H. 

Collins 
Margaret Reed 
Josephine Riddilc 



1921] 

VERSE 
Edith Patch 
Inez L. Shaw- 
Lou W. Conklin 
Margaret Copp 
Selmond \V. Stone 
Winifred Dysart 
Viola Wertheim 
Jean S. Baker 
Elisabeth Hodges 
Sophie Cohen 
Gwendolyn Ray 
Sophia H. Walker 
Marianna R. 

Ruffner 
Mary Abby Hurd 
Gwynne M. Dresser 
Florence Frear 
Helen P. Carson 
Ellen J. Schorr 
Amy Armitage 
Clara Starck 
.lessie C. Smith 
Marjorie K. 

Rockwell 
Janet Watson 
Pauline Averill 
Barbara Maniene 
Katharine L. 

Woodworth 
Elizabeth C. 

Lankford 
Glenn Kyker 
Margaret H. 

Thompson 
Margaret Sheridan 
Patricia Sheridan 
Jane Kluckhohn 
Josephine F. 

Newcomb 
Elaine Brown 
Florence 

Gershkourtz 
Doris Kinciade 
Barbara E. Watson 
Elizabeth Paisley 
Harriette Barnard 
Elizabeth Meader 
Virginia 

Cunningham 
Catharine Stone 
Helen B. Jenks 
Gretchen N. 

Behringer 
Ruth Tikiob 
Virginia Esselborn 
Anne B. Porter 
Lucy Smith 
Alfred Rakocy 
Margaret R. White 
Dorothy L. Bing 
Miriam L. 

Whitehead 
Betty Devereux 

DRAWINGS 
Harriet Dounes 
Frances Badger 
Marjorie I. Miller 
Ethel Durbin 
Dorothy 
Stephenson 



ST. NICHOLAS LEAGUE 



765 



Keith S. Williams 
Marjorie W. Smith 
Doris Miller 
Theodore Hall, Jr. 



Louise W. Allard 
Elizabeth Genung 
Clara F. Greenwood 
Lucy F. Baldwin 



WHAT THE LEAGUE IS 






MY FAVORITE SPORT 
BY EMMA C. BOWNE, AGE IS 




"A HEADING FOR JUNE" 
BY EDMOND DE FERRARI, 
AGE 14 



Grace Griffin 
Marcia Tikiob 
Verl Goodwin 
Evelyn Owen 
Martha Everett 
Dorothy Jayne 
Louise Blanchard 
William Speer 
Bertha 

Berolzheimer 
Gerald H. Taber 
Helen W. Doud 
Edna B. Marks 
Betty de 

Morinni 
Orole Williams 
Theodora 

Pleadwell 
Jessie Goodman 
Sibyl 

Fahnestock 
Evelvn Balmer 



PHOTO- 
GRAPHS 

Margaret Blake 

Josephine Beals 

Charles B. 
Schauffler 

Frances Miller 



Bruce H. Younger 
Thomas F. Webb 
Virginia G. Myers 
Muriel Howard 
Alice Bragdon 
Lucia G. Martin 
Anita Kellogg 

PUZZLES 
Oriole J. Tucker 
Natalie Johns 
Alma Miller 
Elizabeth M. 

Parmelee 
Ruth Miescher 
Elisabeth V. 

Freeland 
Edna M. Royle 
Herbert J. 

Goldfrank 
Jean Pattison 
Derexa Pentreath 
Medora Harrison 
Elizabeth Forman 
Marion Wadsworth 
Elaine Ervin 
Adolph 

Weisenburg 
Glee Viles 
Florence Goddard 



The St. Nicholas League is an organization of 
the readers of the St. Nicholas Magazine. 

The League motto is "Live to learn and learn to 

live." . „ 

The League emblem is the "Stars and Stripes. 

The League membership button bears the 
League name and emblem. 

The St. Nicholas League organized in Novem- 
ber, 1899, became immediately popular with earnest 
and enlightened young folks, and is now widely rec- 
ognized as one of the great artistic educational 
factors in the life of American boys and girls. 

The St. Nicholas League awards gold and silver 
badges each month for the best original poems, 
stories, drawings, photographs, puzzles, and puzzle 
answers. 

PRIZE COMPETITION No. 259 

Competition No. 259 will close July 3. All con- 
tributions intended for it must be mailed on or 
before that date. Prize announcements will be 
made and the selected contributions published in 
St. Nicholas for October. Badges sent one month 
later. 

Verse. To contain not more than twenty-four 
lines. Subiect, "Flight." 

Prose. Essay or story of not more than three 
hundred words. Subject, "An Important Discovery." 

Photograph. Any size, mounted or unmounted; 
no blue prints or negatives. Young photographers 
need not print and develop their pictures them- 
selves. Subject, " In Summer-Time." 

Drawing. India ink, very black writing-ink, or 
wash. Subject, "A Bit of Life" or "A Heading for 
October." 

Puzzle. Must be accompanied by answer in full. 

Puzzle Answers. Best and neatest complete set 
of answers to puzzles in this issue of St. Nicholas. 
Must be addressed to The Riddle-box. 

No unused contribution can be returned unless it 
is accompanied by a self-addressed and stamped en- 
velop of proper size to hold the manuscript or picture. 

RULES 

Any reader of St. Nicholas, whether a subscriber 
or not, is entitled to League membership, and upon 
application a League badge and leaflet will be sent 
free. No League member who has reached the age 
of eighteen years may compete. 

Every contribution, of whatever kind, must bear 
the name, age, and address of the sender and 
be indorsed as "original" by parent, teacher, or 
guardian, who must be convinced beyond 
doubt — and must state in writing — that the 
contribution is not copied, but wholly the work 
and idea of the sender. 

If prose, the number of words should also be added. 
These notes must not be on a separate sheet, but on 
the contribution itself — if manuscript, on the upper 
margin; if a picture, on the margin or back. Write 
in ink on one side of the paper only. A contributor 
may send but one contribution a month — not one of 
each kind, but one only; this, however, does not in- 
clude "competitions" in the advertising pages or 
"Answers to Puzzles." 

Address: The St. Nicholas League, 
The Century Co. 
353 Fourth Avenue, New York. 



THE LETTER-BOX 



Christiania, Norway. 
Dear St. Nicholas: I am staying with my aunt and 
uncle for a year in Norway. This summer we are going 
for a trip on the fjords and we are also going salmon- 
fishing, which must be great sport. Norway is a beau- 
tiful country covered with mountains, and with snow 
most of the year. 

I am very much interested in "The Dragon's Secret," 
and "The Luck of Denewood." 

I got a Hardanger peasant dress for Christmas. It 
has a black skirt, white waist, a red bodice with a red 
belt, a cap covered with beads, and a white apron. 
Your loving reader, 

Frances Rodgers (age 14). 



Bradford, Mass. 
Dear St. Nicholas: I have taken you nearly two 
years and enjoy you very much. My sister and I 
always have a scramble to get you first. 

Four years ago my mother brought my sister and me 
to America from Japan. We did n't know a single 
word of English, though, before we came here, Mother 
was teaching us A-B-C. 

I enjoy all your stories, but among those that interest 
me most are Augusta Huiell Seaman's stories. I thought 
"The Crimson Patch," was very interesting, and I like 
"The Dragon's Secret" very much. 

I am always anxious to get you. 

Your devoted reader, 

Kimi G. Tamura (age 13). 



Mi. Pleasant, Iowa. 
Adorable St. Nicholas: Don't you like to know 
when you help any one? I do, and that 's the very 
reason I 'm writing this. 

I belong to the Pioneer Corps of the Girl Reserves and 
we had planned a Valentine party at which they wanted 
me to give a reading. A Girl Reserve will not refuse 
what is asked of her, so I found a poem and learned it 
the first of the week, but about a half an hour before, 
when I thought it over, it seemed inappropriate. But 
what could I do? And then, all of a sudden, I thought 
of you — "the very thing!" It did n't take long to find 
the most adorable poem, which every one liked. 

So you see you were the friend indeed that helped a 
friend in need, 

Your admiring reader, 

Jane D. Wilson. 



Halighton, La. 
Dear St. Nicholas: I have taken you for two or three 
years, and have certainly enjoyed you during that time, 
My mother suggested that I take you to the school 
this winter, and I did. My, how they scrambled for 
you! Every month now I take you there, and they all 
want you first. We work the puzzles out, but never 
send them in. 

We all like "The Luck of Denewood." Every one 
wants to read that first. I like "The Dragon's Secret" 
best. "The Crimson Patch" and "The Slipper Point 
Mystery" were good too. 

Your devoted reader, 

Clara Tucker (age ii). 



Hudson, O. 

Dear St. Nicholas: One of Mother's Christmas 
gifts to me was you. She gave you to me for a year, 
but I can hardly imagine not having you next year 
also. For three months I have watched very eagerly 



for each magazine. I sometimes wish you came oftener. 
but I have the pleasure of thinking of the stories and 
poems you will bring the next month, after I have read 
each magazine. 

I was very glad to receive the certificate showing 
that I am now a member of the League. I proudly 
wear my membership button, and I hope I shall get a 
silver or gold badge before I am eighteen. We are going 
to frame the certificate, and hang it on the wall in my 
bedroom. 

I took the March number to school, on Friday, 
March 4, and suggested to my teacher that the maga- 
zine could be passed from one pupil to another and 
each one read the story of one president's inauguration. 
We did it in place of history. 

Thanking you again for membership in the League, 
I am 

Your delighted reader, 

Jacquelin R. Williams (age ii). 

Fort Qu' Appelle, Saskatchewan, Canada. 
Dear St. Nicholas: I read the Letter-box every 
month, but I have not yet seen a letter from this part 
of Canada, so I thought I would write one to tell you 
that I live on the site of the Hudson's Bay Company's 
post, established here in 1858. It was here, also, that 
the Indians of the Northwest Territories made the first 
treaty with the Government, in September, 1874. A 
monument was erected here in 1015 to commemorate 
this treaty. Wishing every success to the League, I 
remain, 

Your affectionate reader, 
Frances G. McDonald (age 12). 

A BIRTHDAY LETTER TO A LITTLE SISTER 

Boarding-School-on-Hudson, New York. 
Dear Nancy: This is a kind of birthday letter, al- 
though it will probably come before your birthday. 
Is n't it a grand and glorious feeling to be six! I shall 
listen on the night before your birthday for the bang 
that always comes at midnight. In the midst of this 
explosion, you will grow to be six. 
This is a movie: 






tad 







I. at five minutes of 
twelve 



2. at five minutes past 
twelve 



At five minutes of twelve, Nancy is sound asleep in 
picture 1. As twelve o'clock strikes, there is a loud 
explosion. The bed-clothes fly all over! At five min- 
utes past twelve. Nancy is asleep again and everything 
looks as if nothing had happened, but Nancy has grown 
several inches taller. Don't let me frighten you with 
these pictures, for, to tell the truth, the birthday girl 
never feels the explosion at all. I know, for I have had 
seventeen birthdays! So don't worry. Be on the watch 
for six cages full of bear-hugs which are on their way to 
you. From 

Sister Janet. 
(Janet Blossom, Graduate of St. Nicholas League) 



760 



Double Zigzag. From i to : 
gomery. Cross-words: I. Loam 
5. Ogle, 



ANSWERS TO PUZZLES 

Little Rock; 3 to 4, Mont- 
2. Riot. 3. Ants. 4. Taft. 
6. Peon. 7. Ream. 8. Poet. 9. Arcs. 10. Yolk. 
Arithmetical Puzzle. Mary was 15, Tippy, 5- 
Double Acrostic. Primals, Hepatica; finals, Marigold. 
Cross-words: t. Harm. 2. Edna. 3- Pear. 4- Anti. 5- Twig. 
6. Into. 7. Coal. 8. Amid. 
A Riddle. Pepper. 

An Obelisk. First row, Warren Harding; fourth row, Calvin 
Coolidge. Cross-words: r. X. 2. She. 3- Gorge. 4. Needy. 
5. India. 6. Dally. 7- Rigor. 8. Arrow, g. Hunch. 10. 
Ninny. II. Eerie. 12. Reave. 13- Rally. 14- Altar. 15. 
Witch. 

Illustrated Numerical Enigma. 

"The year 's at the spring 
And day 's at the morn." 
Charade. Boss-ton. Boston. 



IN THE MAY NUMBER 

Metamorphoses, i. Rake, rate, date, dare, dart, dirt. 2. 
Dirt, dart. cart. 3. Cart, carp, camp, damp, dump. 

Pi. May shall make the world anew, 
Golden sun and silver dew, 
Money, minted in the sky, 
Shall the earth's new garments buy. 

Triple Beheadings and Triple Curtailings. Shakespeare. 
1. Sen-sit-ive. 2. Wit-her-ing. 3- Imp-art-ial. 4. Moc-kin- 
gly. 5. Imp-end-ing. 6. Pre-sum-ing. 7- Com-pan-ion. 8. 
Int-err'-upt. 9. Adv-ant-age. 10. Int-rod-uce. 11. Tol-era-ted. 

King's Move Puzzle. Augusta Huiell Seaman: 81-71-62-63 
72-80-70-61-S1-50-42-S2-60-69-79-78-68-77-76. Three Sides of 
Paradise Green: 67-59-49-41-33-34-44-45-54-53-43-35-36-26-25- 
24-23-13-12-20-30-21-11-3-2. The Crimson Patch: 1-10-19-29-38- 
28-37-47-55-46-56-65-64-73-74- The Slipper Point Mystery: 75- 
66-58-57-48-39-40-31-32-22-14-4-5-15-16-6-7-8-17-27-18-9. 



To Our Puzzlers: Answers to be acknowledged in the magazine must be mailed not later than July 3, and should be addressed 
to St Nicholas Riddle-box, care of The Century Co., 353 Fourth Avenue, New \ork City, , JN. v. , 

Solvers wishing to compete for prizes must comply with the League rules (see page 76s) and give answers tn full, follow.ng the 



plan of those printed above. ,. , , 

Answers to all the Puzzles in the March Number were duly received from Mason 1 . Record- 
Anna's Girls— "Patty Duffy." 



-Ruth Tangier Smith— St. 



Answers'™ Puzzles in the March Number were received from Rachel Hammond 9— Virginia Ball— John F. Davis, 9 
'•Eighth Grade," Slayton, 9-N0 name, 9-Kemper Hall. 8-Dorothy Donaldson, 8-EU.e Wiese, 7-Dorothy Marshick 7- 
Harriet Rosewater, 6— Mary I. Fry, 6— Esther Tollefson. 5— Margaret Gorton. 5— Bettina Booth, 5— Edward E. Wendell, 5— T,l, 
Jenkins, 4 — Hortense A. Doyle, 3 — Josephine M^ Miller, 3- 
M. Scattergood, 2- 

■ ' 1 > \ " ( \ i ( \ 1 1 • ) 1 ',11 \ — > r 1 , 1 1 . \ > . 1 1 . j , jn.. in . t ' . j ■ ■ 

R.— A. H.— G. M.— M. S.— D. S.- 
J — R.-T. R.— W. B. I.— G. G. H.— J. T.— P. A. M.- 
C— M. B.— M. E. W.— F. H— S. B. 



-Jule 

-Carlan S Messier, 3 — E. B. McClox, 2— J. V. Gilbert, 2— F. Dekum, 
-M. Scholter, 2— E. W. Johnston. 2— K. Kahler, 2— R. E. Nason 2— V. Drew, a— M Gherini, 2. One 
puzzle, A. L. LeJ.-E. B. N.-C. McC.-M. G.-M. A.-M. C-V S.-V, B -- F { J ®- J , r ;- J ' *M G ~?' L ~ P - F ' 

— J. M.— E. M. T.— W. K. B.— V. C— B. M— E. G.— W. S— M. M— L. S.— M. W. O.— M. 



N. S. C— A. G. D— H. L. B.— M. 
L. B — C. B— F. C. K. — G. LeR- 



— E. J. P- 
C— A. A. 



-D. W. E— A. D.— M. 
P.— M. B.— P. G.— A. 



OMITTED CONSONANTS 

(Silver Badge, St. Nicholas League Competition) 
There are six geographical names in which every sec- 
ond letter is a vowel; moreover, all the vowels are the 
same. The names are those of two cities, two countries, 
one desert, and one river. What are these six geograph- 
ical names? alice wilkins (age 10). 

SOME OF OUR "AUNTS" 

Example: What aunt is a metal? Answer: Anti- 
mony. 

1. What aunt is a swift animal? 

2. What aunt is an ocean? 

3. What aunt goes before? 

4. What aunt lived before the war? 

5. What aunt is a square hall or court? 

6. What aunt is ever looking into the future? 

7. What aunt is part of a deer? 

8. What aunt is an adversary? 

9. What aunt is very old? 

1 o. What aunt is devoted to the study of ancient times 
through their relics? 

mary Catherine Hamilton (age 1 2), League Member. 

A SCHOLAR'S ACROSTIC 

(Silver Badge, St. Nicholas League Competition) 
The words described contain six letters each. When 
rightly guessed and written one below another, the 
initial letters will spell what every scholar hopes to do. 
Cross-words: i. A Hebrew liberator and reformer 



who probably lived in the 13th century B. C. 2. A 
timorous little animal. 3. To attract. 4. A dainty 
fabric. 5. Above. 6. Emphasis. 7. A sacred edifice. 
8. To inveigle. 

The forty-eight letters of which these words are com- 
posed, counting from left to right and in the order given, 
will spell: 3-11-26-41-5-21-13, the scholar's treasure; 
8-39-9-46-23-20-5-35, what urges the scholar onward; 
8-14-21-31-39-28-37-38-7, the object of the scholar's 
deepest regard. betty dering (age 11). 

A FLIGHT OF STEPS 

(Silver Badge, St. Nicholas League Competition) 
This puzzle begins with a letter; the second word de- 
scribed contains two letters, the third, three, and so on 
to the eleventh word which contains eleven letters. The 
eleven final letters of the eleven words will spell a mag- 
nificent pleasure-ground. 

Cross-words: r. In Wyoming. 2. A pronoun. 3. 
The whole. 4. A game. 5. A musical instrument. 0. 
A color. 7. Certain young animals. 8. One who pre- 
pares homilies. 9. An "armored" animal. 10. Deep 
sorrow for sin. ri. To reduce in bulk and so increase in 



strength. 



I. In spacious, 
beautiful city. 4. 



LAEL TUCKER (age II). 

DIAMOND 

2. A common vehicle. 3. A certain 
Extensive. 5. In spacious. 



tommy Baldwin (age 10), League Member. 



767 



768 



THE RIDDLE-BOX 



ILLUSTRATED CENTRAL ACROSTIC 

4- * ^--"i, *li4.$s,j 




In this puzzle the words are pictured instead of de- 
scribed. When the eleven objects have been rightly 
named and written one below another, the central let- 
ters, reading downward, will spell a very famous 
document that was signed on June 15, many years ago. 

DOUBLE WORDS 

Example: Words pronounced alike but spelled dif- 
ferently. Unfurnished: An animal. Answer: bare, 
bear. 

1. Just; food. 

2. To incline; a legal claim. 

3. A tool; everything. 

4. Illustrious; a fireplace. 

5. To expire; to color. 

6. A mounting upward; concurrence. 

7. A pronoun; a tree. 

The initials of the first words, and the initials of the 
second words also, will spell a day observed by all true 
patriots. 

gwenfread e. allen (age 15), Honor Member. 

CHARADE 

My first expresses deep content. 
My last gives warmth and glow; 

My whole is very evident, — 
You 're it yourself, you know. 

HELEN A. SIBLEY. 

PRIMAL ACROSTIC 

All the words described contain the same number of 
letters. When rightly guessed and written one below 
another, the initial letters will spell a flower that is never 
used for decoration. 

Cross-words: r. A large animal. 2. A fruit. 3. 
A relative. 4. A kind of cloth. 5. A lazy person. 6. 
Finely ground meal. 7. A spear. 8. Detestation. 9. 
To vacillate. 10. A number. 11. Competitor. 

ruth MacLEOD (age 14), League Member. 

TRIPLE BEHEADINGS AND TRIPLE CURTAILINGS 

(Silver Badge, St. Nicholas League Competition) 
Example: Take a vehicle and a snare from a small 

chest of drawers and leave a letter. Answer: Cab-i- 

net. In each case leave a letter. 

1. Take to tap and direction, from a road. 

2. Take equal value and a darling, from a low wall. 

3. Take a vehicle and a play of Euripides, from a 
repulsive substance. 

4. Take an edict and a receptacle, from a large paste- 
board box for hats. 

5. Take a large vessel and a metal receptacle, from the 
palace of the popes. 

6. Take an implement for writing and an emmet, from 
a small flag. 



7. Take to capture and an epoch, from luggage. 

8. Take an animal and its foot, from a dupe. 

9- Take a masculine name and silent, from the 
greatest quantity. 

10. Take a useful little article and consumed, from 
feather-like. 

11. Take a vehicle and direction, from an aromatic 
seed. 

12. Take a finish and a color, from tolerated. 

13. Take to drag and an era, from baggage. 

14. Take a kind of ribbed cloth and a masculine 
nickname, from estimated. 

15- Take conflict and an insect, from justification. 
16. Take a pronoun and a color, from clipped close. 
17- Take a warm covering and a pronoun, from addi- 
tional. 

18. Take a human being and relatives, from a dwarf. 

19. Take a wager and to know, from to portend. 

20. Take a lady's ornament and a conspicuously 
brave airman, from a small boat. 

The twenty single letters will spell an occasion of 
national interest. Elizabeth barton (age 17). 

DIAMONDS CONNECTED BY A SQUARE 



* * * * * 

* * * * # 
***** 
***** 
***** 



1. In courtesy. 
4. A feminine 



I. Upper, Left-hand Diamond: 
2. The cry of an animal. 3. Artful 
name. 5. In courtesy. 

II. Upper, Right-hand Diamond: i. In courtesy. 
2. A beverage. 3. Barm. 4. A serpent. 5. In courtesy. 

III. Central Square: i. A pleasure boat. 2. A 
sacred name among Arabs and Mohammedans. 3. 
Near at hand. 4. Metal straps used with padlocks. 5. 
A pronoun. 

IV. Lower, Left-hand Diamond: 
2. A chart. 3. A piece of furniture. 4 
forth. 5. In courtesy. 

V. Lower, Right-hand Diamond: 
2. A number 
courtesy. 

olga f. j. and ena l. h 



1. In courtesy. 
To go back and 



1. In courtesy. 
3- To penetrate. 4. A fish. 5. In 



(League Members). 



1 11 ic ui'.Mrdini i'u i.sh 

CONOOKU 



No. 2 Brownie Negative. 

The Brownie Boy 



EASTMAN KODAK CO., Rochester, N. Y., The Kodak City. 





* 

The CENTURY Magazine 




Is It On Your Library Table? 

<I Homes are known by the magazine company they keep. In 
the homes where there are growing children, the high-class 
magazines on the library table are an influence that helps shape 
mental growth, and stimulates to the right kind of thought. 

<I Probably you already know that THE CENTURY, beginning 
with the May number, has embarked upon an ambitious and 
enlarged program. We are striving to make it a journal of Ameri- 
can life and letters which will be a necessity to the best 
American homes. 

<I Physically you will find the magazine satisfying. The brown 
and gold CENTURY, with its easily-read, large-print text, its illus- 
trations by the foremost artists, is a magazine you will enjoy 
seeing on your reading table. 

<I As to its contents— we are striving to give you the best 
obtainable in American and English fiction, in essays of ideas, 
in the significant work of outstanding poets, and in articles 
which deal courageously and constructively with urgent issues of 
American life. 

<I Galsworthy, Sinclair Lewis, Agnes Repplier, Harvey O'Hig- 
gins, Donn Byrne, Lincoln Colcord, Tagore, Dorothy Canfield, 
Phyllis Bottome, H. L. Mencken, Harry Franck, Alexander Black, 
Charmian London, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Anzia Yerzierska, 
Frederick O'Brien— these are a few among the contributors to 
recent and forthcoming numbers. 

<I The June Century is now on the news-stands. The July number will 
be out June 25th. But we suggest that if you are not already a sub- 
scriber, you tear out this sheet, write your name and address across the 
bottom of it, and enclose with a five dollar bill to 

THE CENTURY MAGAZINE 

353 Fourth Avenue New York City 



¥0 

mm 




When the 
circus comes 
to town 

Gee, that's when a fellow 
needs a bicycle ! 

Besides being right on the spot 
where everything is going on, a 
fellow can go errands, deliver 
messages, earn money, and have 
loads of sport — all at once. 

All through the year, an Iver 
Johnson Bicycle stands ready to 
take you anywhere, anytime — 
and at no expense. 

Iver Johnson Juvenile Bicycles 
embody Iver Johnson adult con- 
struction throughout. Seamless 
steel tubing; drop-forged parts; 
two-piece crank set ; perfect two- 
point bearings, both cones on 
one axle, always in alignment; 
superb enamel and nickel finish; 
and the best equipment make 
Iver Johnson the King of Bicy- 
cles. Unbeatable for good 
looks, easy riding, speed, 
strength, and durability. 

Iver Johnson Juvenile Bicycles, $47.50 to $52.50 

(iVo extra charge for Coaster Brake) 
Other models, $60 and up 

Write today for free bicycle catalog "B" 

IVER JOHNSON'S ARMS & CYCLE WORKS 
358 River Street, Fitchburg, Mass 

99Chambers St., New York 717 Market St., San Francisco 

IVER JOHNSON 
BICYCLES 



FIFTIETH 
ANNIVERSARY 



THE tray with its dainty 
glass of Welch's carries 
a wholesome appeal to the 
appetite. 

Welch's is pure fruit 
juice, and supplies much 
needed elements for build- 
ing strong, healthy young 
bodies. A glass a day pro- 
motes health. 

For a longer drink on a 
hot day, and for parties, mix 
Welch's with plain or 
charged water or lemonade. 

Ask for Welch's at the 
Fountain. 

Welch's Grapelade is a 
smooth, pure grape-spread 
for bread, rolls, muffins or 
toast. Ask Mother to order 
it from your grocer. 

THE WELCH GRAPE JUICE CO. 
Westfield, N. Y. 




Welchs 

5rap< 




ST. NICHOLAS STAMP PAGE 

Conducted by Samuel R. Simmons 



new ISSUES 

Some months ago the Mozambique Company issued a 
charming little series of stamps, many of them picturing 
the natural products of the country. We illustrated 
several of them at the time. There now appear two 





more values, equally bright and fascinating. Like the 
others, they are bi-colored. The four-centavos has a 
frame of green and a center of brown; the design in the 
center shows a native working in a field of tobacco. 
The six-centavos has a frame of maroon, and the blue 
center shows a coffee planta- 
tion. fThe Panama Canal 
has served to bring the Island 
of Jamaica into greater popu- 
larity than it formerly had. 
Its stamps have never ap- 
proached the beautiful issues 
of St. Lucia or St. Vincent, nor 
attained the popularity of 
other of the British West In- 
dies. But in these later years, 
the flood of tourists stopping 
over at Kingston has helped 
to bring attention to the 
stamps of the island. We illustrate a beautiful new 
four-penny, the green frame with oranges at the sides 
contrasts with the sepia center, where is pictured the 
old Cathedral at Spanish Town — a pretty stamp to own. 

A COMPETITION 
From the tenor of the letters which we have received 
recently, it would seem as if quite a few of our readers 
were eager for another competition. And, indeed, it is 
some time since we have had one. But if all these young- 
sters are so eager for a competition, perhaps it would 
be a good idea to give them a really difficult one. We 
remember, by the way, that in our last contest of this 
kind the young ladies rather eclipsed the young men in 
the quality of the answers received. So, bearing this 
in mind, we tried to think of a puzzle which would es- 
pecially interest the boys — arouse them to do better 
than the girls. And while we pondered over several 
subjects, there suddenly flashed into our mind the word 
— "cannon." Girls are not interested in cannon, but 
boys are. Indeed, the Editor well remembers that as a 
small boy he once owned a wooden cannon, called a 
"Quaker gun." It would shoot off peas and beans and 
bring about terrible catastrophes among our leaden 
soldiers. The recollections of that wooden cannon are 
so pleasing that we are going to have our competition 
center around it. But not cannon in general; we have 
in mind a specific stamp which bears in its design a 
cannon. If our readers will take their stamp catalogues 
and turn to Bulgaria, they will see that in 1901 there was 
an issue consisting of two stamps. It was what is called 
a Commemorative issue, for the purpose of celebrating 



the War of Independence. Now the central part of the 
design is a cannon, a curious-looking cannon. It has 
often attracted our attention, and we would like to know 
more about it. Is it just an imaginative picture drawn 
by the artist, or does it represent some actual piece of 
artillery? Has it a history? Does it still exist? And if 
it exists, where is it now? Who can tell us? It almost 
seems as if it did have a history, because a recent issue 
of stamps by Bulgaria, portrayed on one value, is a 
cannon which looks very much like this earlier one. So 
this shall be our competition: Who of our readers can 
tell us most about this set of Bulgarian Commemorative 
stamps, and about the cannon shown on them? And 
what is a competition without a prize? — Of no interest 
at all. So for the first prize, there will be a copy of the 
Junior International Stamp Album; and for the second 
prize, there will be a packet of three hundred stamps. 
Now one word of warning: In deciding to whom the 
prizes shall go, we shall consider neatness as well as 
other things; and spelling also. As a rule, a stamp- 
collector is a good speller. Collecting stamps trains one 
to notice differences, and that helps to learn to spell. 
So spelling will count in awarding prizes. All answers 
should be mailed on or before July 3, and the names of 
the winners will be printed in the September number of 
St. Nicholas. Replies should be addressed to 

Editor St. Nicholas Stamp Page, 
The Century Company, 
353 Fourth Avenue, New York City. 

ANSWERS TO QUERIES 
It is not often that the publishers of Scott's Standard 
Catalogue are caught napping. But it looks as if one 
of our bright-eyed readers had caught them for once. 
This lad writes to us that he has a stamp from New 
Zealand which is surcharged RAROTONGA. He says 
he can find no reference to it in the catalogue. It should 
follow Quelimane in the catalogue, he thinks, but it is 
not there. There is no such country listed in the "In- 
dex," nor is there any allusion to it in that very help- 
ful list of "Colonies controlled by Parent States." So 
he writes for information, and we were surprised our- 
selves to find the name not listed. However, the stamps 
are mentioned all right, and our readers will find them 
listed under Cook Islands. Most of the Raratonga 
stamps are surcharged upon issues by New Zealand, 
but recently there has appeared an unsurcharged issue. 
And on one of its values is a most interesting picture of 
the redoubtable Captain Cook himself — the man who 
discovered and charted not only those islands which 
bear his name, but also many other groups in Oceanica. 
A similar set of stamps — in the same design, but 
differing colors — has been issued also by other islands, 
Aitutaki, Niue, and Penrhyn. It is a remarkably pretty 
set of stamps. 1 We have also been asked by several 
readers what may be the meaning of certain surcharges 
upon different stamps of Germany — more especially 
those two "Saargebeit" and "Postgebeit Ob. Ost." 
The suffix "gebeil" may perhaps be translated as "ter- 
ritory" or "district," so that "Saargebeit" would be 
the section of country adjacent to or near Saar. The 
stamps surcharged "Postgebeit Ob. Ost." were for use 
in the occupied Russian territory "Ob. Ost.," "Over 
East," from Poland, more especially the territory around 
Courland, Kovno, and Vilna, covering portions of the 
countries now known as Esthonia, Latvia, and Lithu- 
ania. Our readers will find them listed in the Standard 
Catalogue under "Lithuania." 

(Concluded on second following page) 



THE ST. NICHOLAS STAMP DIRECTORY 

Is really a list of reliable Stamp Dealers. These people have studied stamps for years, perhaps they helped' 
your father and mother when they first started their stamp collections. St. Nicholas knows that these dealers 
are trustworthy. When writing to them be sure to give your full name and address, and as reference the name 
of your parent, or teacher, or employer, whose permission must be obtained first. It is well also to mention 
St. Nicholas Magazine. Remember, we are always glad to assist you, so write to us for any Information that 
will help you solve your stamp problems. 



SPFflAI STAMP OFFFRS Great bargains, cheapest ever 
arCUAL aifllTir UITGIUJ offeredi no two stamps alike in 

any one set, all different, fine condition. Postage 2c. extra. 50 
Spain, 11c; 40 Japan, 5c; 100 U. S., 20c; 7 Siam, 15c; 50 Ma, 17c; 
20 Chile, 10c; 4 Malta, 5c; 30 Holland, 9c; 10 Jamaica, 10c; 10 
Straits, 7c; 10 Egypt, 7c; 7 Persia, 4c; 10 Ceylon, 15c; 8 Hawaii, 
20c; 20 Denmark, 7c; 30 Sweden, 10c; 50 Brit. Col's, 6c; 8 Peru, 4c; 
25 Persia, 25c; 10 Brazil, 5c; 50 Africa, 24c; 6 Fiji, 15c; 25 Italy, 5c; 
7 Iceland, 20c; 4 Sudan, 8c: 10 China, 10c; 17 Mexico, 10c; 10 Uru- 
guay, 7c; 6 Reunion, 5c; 5 Panama, 13c; 20 New Zealand, 15c. Remit 
in stamps or money order. 50-page list free. We buy stamps. 
MARKS S TAMP CO., Dept. N, Toronto, Canada. 

DON'T READ THIS ADVERT. £fc£g 

at the top of this page, then write and tell us that you have read it. 

WE ARE STILL GIVING AWAY 

cants for our APPROVAL SHEETS who send satisfactory refer- 
ences, and we are selling 50 British Colonies and 50 War and New 
Europe for FIFTY CENTS. Send for our PRICE LIST containing 
SPECIAL BARGAINS in PACKETS for this month only. 

NORTON STAMP CO. 
189 COXWELL AVENUE TORONTO, CANADA 

NORTH BORNEO 

Rare set of 4, 1909. . . . 6c 

As illustrated. Sent only to approval applicants. 

LAKEWOOD STAMP COMPANY 
Dept. N Lakewood, Ohio 

BONANZA BARGAIN OFFER 

51 diff. stamps, also packet 5 unused, China ship set, 2 scarce 
animal stamps, large $1.00 U. S. revenue, perforation gauge, 
millimetre scale, ruler and price lists. All for 9c ! Finest 
approvals; British Colonies, etc., large discounts. Fennell 
Stamp Co., Dept. S, Fullerton Bldg., St. Louis, Mo. 

t CQ Genuine Foreign Stamps — Mexico War issues, 
1 JO Venezuela, Salvador and India Service, 1 A/» 

Guatemala, China, etc. Only lu< - 

Finest Approval Sheets 50 to 60%- Agents Wanted. Big 
72-page Lists Free. We buy Stamps. EBtab. 25 yrs. 
Hussman Stamp Co., Dept. 52, St. Louis, Mo. 

I have an unusual assortment of 

MODERATE PRICED STAMPS 

I will send approval sheetB upon request. 
DICKSON W. BAKER STAMP CO. 
1276 Clinton Place Elizabeth, N. J. 





4 Malay; 8 Finland; 20 Sweden; 8 Hondu- 
ras; 8 Costa Rica; 10 Porto Rico; 8 Dutch Indies; 6 Hayti. Lists 
of 7000 low-priced stamps free. 

Chambers Stamp Co., ill G Nassau Street, New York City 



BARGAINS FOR APPROVAL 35 var. Pictorial stamps for 15c; 15 
APPLICANTS var. War for 10c; 10 var. Bulgarian 

for 15c. All three packets for 30c. Big list Free. 

W. J. ZINK, 4607 Denison Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. 



Why my approvals are the best: (1) No trash. (2) Lowest 
price : 50 per cent, with extra discounts for quick returns. (3) Attrac- 
tive Sheets arranged by countries. (4) War stamps and Late issues 
at Moderate Net Prices. (5) Prompt Service. Hundreds 
of St. NicholaB boys have tried them. Why not YOU ? 

D. M. WARD, 608 Buchanan St., GARY, IND. 



fT) nr 2 GERMAN AEROPLANE STAMPS 
I* f\ W* W* to approval applicants. Reference required. 
* J. R. Nichols, 2322 Loring PI., New York City. 



A SURPRISE awa " s those who write for a trial selection of 
my one, two, and five cent approvals. It is a 
FREE SIAM stamp. H. E. Codwise, Melrose Highlands, Mass. 



THF <iTAMP NFWS Dept.S.Peekskill.N.Y. 
iriE, OlAlVlr 1>L. YV O A New Monthly Stamp 
Magazine. 35c A YEAR. 4STSend for FREE Sample Copy.=» 



* Austrian Republic — New postage due stamps — 9 varieties 10c. 

R. H. A. Green, 636 Hinman Avenue, Evanston, 111. 



FREE 



5 unused French Colonies to Approval Appli- 
cants. ROESSLER'S Stamp NEWS, 6 mos. 15c. 
Edwin H. Bailey, Box 25, Farniingdale, N. Y. 



WORLD'S LARGEST 



NEW 1921 PRICE LIST 

Including eight pages of Information for Collectors 

Describing in detail all technical terms used by philatelists. 
An invaluable aid. The price list is an illustrated booklet 
of SO pages and is free for the asking. Lists many hundreds 
of sets of stamp packets, mixtures, etc., as well as our com- 
plete line of philatelic publications and accessories. 

SCOTT STAMP & COIN COMPANY 

33 West 44th Street NEW YORK CITY 

1 Art VARIETIES OF NEW EUROPE 7[J„ 
1UU STAMPS ARE GETTING SCARCE / OC 

150 all different U. S., catalogue over $5. 00, 50c. 100 varieties Pictorial 
Foreign, 50c. 100 varieties of Austrian stamps, $1.00. 80 all differ- 
ent, from Mexico, $1.00. 1000 best peelable imported hinges, 15c. 

1 Cent and 2 Cent Net Books 

Best of condition, large variety to choose from, sent on approval. 
Also rare books. 

P/~* DC AT C 170 A TREMONT STREET 
• Vi« DtALO BOSTON, MASS. 

Wholesale and Retail Catalogue of 
Postage Stamps now ready. 128 pages- 
Whether you are a dealer or collector you need it. Single stamps, 
sets, packets, albums, supplies, etc. Price 10c. Worth $$ to you. 
Mnnthlv Pircnlar 0f new arrivals, price changes, etc. One 
111UIH1I1V V/lltUldl vear f or 35 c all d your choice of any one of 
the following premiums: *17 Belgium Parcel Post Cat. 55c; 30 
diff. French Colonies; 30 diff. Portugal and Colonies or 40 diff. 
new Europe. Premiums worth 35c alone. Remit in stamps. 
MARKS STAMP CO., Dep't. N, TORONTO, CANADA 

CT \ TUfPQ, ! 50 a " diff - British Guiana, Cuba, China, India, 
►J 1 yJ • Jamaica, Japan, Portugal, Venezuela, etc., only 

10c! 100 all diff. 15c! 1000 all diff., fine collection in itself, $5.00; 
100 diff. U. S., 30c; 1000 hinges, 10c. Agents wtd. 50% com. 
List free. I buy stamps. L. B. Dover, Longmont, Colo. 

55 ALL DIFFERENT STAMPS 

including China, Japan, French Colonies, etc., given to 
applicants for our high grade approval selections. Send 
references and 2c stamp to the EDGEWOOD STAMP 
CO., Dept. S, Milford, Connecticut. 

Stamps 50 all diff., Transvaal, Brazil, Peru, Cuba, 
Mexico, Ceylon, Java, etc., and Album, 10c. 1000 
Finely Mixed, 40c. 50 diff. U. S., 25c. 1000 hinges, 
10c. Agts. wtd., 50%. List Free. I buy stamps. 
C. Stegman, 5940 Cote Brilliante Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

CMADQ 150 different foreign, 18c. 60 different U. S. in- 
(jl^rVrO c l u ding $1 and $2 revenues, for 12c. With each 
order we give free our pamphlet which tells " How to Make a Col- 
lection Properly." QUEEN CITY STAMP AND COIN CO., 
Room 32, 604 Race St., Cincinnati, 0. 

—Persia, No. 90 to 100 Cat. $1.93. Mint, only 60c. 
Fine stamps on approval. Send reference, please. 
A. A. LEVE, P. O. Box 495 N., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 




BOYS 



All B nnnfo 20 different stamps from 20 different 
All IOr O CeniS Countries. 10 unused, 2 Malay (Tigers), 
all different. FOYE STAMP COMPANY, Detroit, Mich. 

STAMPS— 20 VARIETIES, UNUSED, FREE to all send- 
ing for our approval sheets at 50% discount. Postage 2 cents. 
Mention St. Nicholas. Quaker Stamp Co., Toledo, Ohio. 

HIAWATHA PACKET NO. 1 for name, address, 2 
collectors, 2c postage, asking for quality apprs. Ref. 
please. Hiawatha Stamp Shop, Syracuse, N. Y. 



FREE 



innn different stamps $3.oo ; 500. $1.25; 200.25c; 100, 12c. 

1UUU Approvals. MICHAELS. 5602 Prairie, Chicago, 111. 



40 



Port. Col's 35c, 45 Asia 18c, 30 French Col's 25c, 80 War 
and Neurope 65c, 400 World Wide $1 .00. A. Emery, 

Dept. N. 567 Oakwood Ave., Toronto, Canada 

(Continued on next page) 



John 




Bennett's 



MASTER SKYLARK 

A tale of Shakespeare s time 

/ I A HE extraordinary success of this juvenile has surpassed the utmost 
A hopes of its publishers. It has been steadily growing in favor since 
1896 — for twenty-four years, requiring numerous and ever larger printings. 

The book is full of the vitality and splendor, activity, adventure, rush 
and movement of life of the great Elizabethan age: a lad with a wonderful 
voice is kidnapped by the Lord Admiral's Players and has wonderful ad- 
ventures in London Town. Heminge and Condell, Ben Jonson and Will 
Shakespeare, Dick Burbage and Tom Heywood, figure in the story, with a 
half-score other famous folk. Illustrated. Price $1.90 



At All Bookstores 
Published by 



THE CENTURY CO. 



353 Fourth Avenue 
New York City 



STAMPS 

(Continued from preceding page) 

DANDY PACKET STAMPS free for name, address 3 col- 
uni 1 V 1 lectors, 2e postage, with 50% apprs. 125 dif. 
U. S. inc. high values, 50c. U. T. K. Stamp Co., Utica, N. Y. 



25 



Gold Coast, Newfoundland, India, etc., FREE with 
trial approval sheets. F. J. Stanton, Norwich, N. Y. 



Genuine Postage Stamps on approval. Reference please. 
Hub Postage Stamp Co., 345 Washington St., Boston 9, Mass. 

FDFF ' beautiful French Colonials, to approval appli- 
X I\. Hi H> cants. Frank Hadlet, Box 73, Plainfield, N. J. 

STAMPS 105 China, etc., stamp dictionary, list 3000 bargains, 
2c. Album (500 pictures), 3c. Bullabd& Co., Sta. A, Boston 

All r)5fF«»r*»nf 20n ' 25c : 300,50c; 500, $1.25: 1000. S3.r,n. 
rtll LSUieieilL F L . Onkkn, 630 70th St.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Set of Two Rare German Aeroplane 
Stamps, 15c Postpaid. 

Send name and address for list of Bargains and Approval 
Sheets. 

STEWART PEIRCE STAMP CO., (Dept. 4) 
58 Cornhill, Boston, Mass. 



ST. NICHOLAS STAMP PAGE 

(Continued) 

HThe stamp about which Miss A. R. M. writes us is one 
of the most beautiful of the Italian issues (Scott No. 104). 
It represents the new, or reconstructed, campanile of 
Venice. These campanili, or watch-towers, are not un- 
common throughout Italy. The campanile of Venice was 
very widely known. It was over three hundred feet high 
and was built about 900 A. D. In the year 1902 it 
suddenly collapsed. Preparations were soon undertaken 
for rebuilding it, and in 191 1 the work was completed. 
The central tower in the picture is the campanile. The 
five domes at its base are those of the Cathedral of St. 
Mark. At the left of the tower is the word Venezia 
(Venice) and the two dates, 1902-1912. At the right 
the words, "Come era dove era," ("As it was, where it 
was"). IfThe other Italian stamp (Scott No. 100) 
has a great deal of symbolic ornamentation. The hand 
grasping the sword represents a united people of Italy. 
Turin and Rome united with the palms of peace joining 
the sword. Upon the handle of the sword is embossed 
the arms, or eagle, of Savoy. The hilt of the sword 
ends in two heads; on the right is the wolf of Rome, on 
the left the bull of Turin. Just below the latter are the 
words "Roma E Turino, 1911." Below the words is the 
royal coat of arms, and on the blade of the sword are 
words to the effect that it is issued to celebrate the fifti- 
eth anniversary of Italian unity. There were three 
other stamps in this series, all very interesting. 



The JOY of COLOR 

Provide the young artist with a box of 
Crayola Crayons with which to brighten 
up the home-drawn maps, outline pictures, 
etc., and note how interesting the work 
becomes. 

"CRAYOLA" 

Colored 
Drawing 
Crayons 

for School 
and Home 

Eight in box for ioc. 

Red, Orange, Creen.Yellow, 
Blue, Violet, Brown 
and Black 

One of the Gold Medal family of Crayons 
for all uses. 

Sold by all dealers 

BINNEY & SMITH CO. 

81 Fulton Street, New York City 




Eight lirWf Colors 

schooWmns 

fO B tDucw IOWAL cqiog^ K v 




Fine enough for babies' tender skins — 
equally effective for the skin of grown- 
ups. Soothing, cooling, healing. 

CHESEBROUGH MANUFACTURING COMPANY 
17 State Street (Consolidated) New York 

Vaseline 

Reg U. S .Pat.Qff. 

White 



PETROLEUM JELLY 




Send 
for this 
Story ^Boojk 



BILLY DOLL and Jane 
Doll snuggle most 
comfortably in Reddick 
Folding Brass Doll Beds and 
Cradles. Little mothers of 
the nursery and playroom 
find in these practical toys 
a constant joy. 

Reddick Beds and Cradles, 
according to the story of 
"Little Miss Grown-Up, 
were planned in Toyland 
under the expert eye of old 
Saint Nicholas himself. 

Let us send you this story 
free. Ask your Toy Store 
Man to show you a Reddick 
Folding Brass Doll Bed or 
Cradle. They are built for 
the largest and the tiniest 
doll folk, and beautifully 
trimmed. 




Michigan Wire Goods Co. 
605 Second St., Niles, Mich. 



_ . _ w electrical, rope, airplane, 

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■f V I II I springs, netting, wire fences, 

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auto-towing cables, horse-shoes 
Illustrated Books Describing Uses, FREE 

American Steel & Wire Co. ^^v.p^c. s. a. 



CHICAGO 



Dodson Wren 
House 

4 c>rnpartmeotP 
2$ in. high, 




Cultivate the 
Song Birds-, 



Invite theWrens, Flickers, Martins, Swal- 
lows, Chickadees, Blue Birds and count- 
s', less other feathered songsters; they will 
cometoyourgrounds andstay if youerect 

Dodson Bird Houses 

Son will enjoy hearing the birds sing and watching 
them feed their young. They will eliminate moa- 
quitos, gnats and other insects which destroy 
your trees, shrubbery and garden. 
Dodson Bird Houses are built by Mr. Dodson 
who has spent 30 years in studying the birds 
andtheir habits. He has embodied in his houses 
the little details necessary for the birds comfort and 
protection which attract and keen them with you. 
Thousands of birds flock to beautiful Bird Lodge. Mr. 
*T» _ ■ Dodaon'a home and Bird Sanctuary on the Kankakee River. 

jK af-* 3SL ORDER NOW — Free Book "Your Bird Friends and How 
VB"^ to Win Them", sent on request Illustrating Dodson lino 

<m and giving prices : free also a beautiful colored bird 
V picture wortny of framing. . . 

I _1 II rk„J„__ President American Audubon Association 
Joseph M. UOdSOn 707 Harrison Ave. Kankakee, III. 

Dodson Sparrow Trav guaranteed to rid your eommumlu 

of these quarreUome pests, price $8.00. 



Price 



VENTURES^ 




IVORY "««. 





OU should have seen 
the angry flames spurt 
from old dragon's 
nose ! You should have 
seen him lash his tail 
and spread his fear- 
some toes ! He pounced 
upon the robber men 
and captured almost 
twenty, then promptly 
burned their coat tails 
off and spanked them 
good and plenty. And 
as for Snip and Pussy 
Cat, wherever they 
could find them, they 
nipped those naughty robber men and chased 
around behind them. Meanwhile, those res- 
cued little tots set up a lusty shout. They 
screamed into the robbers' ears and capered 
all about. Then, while the robbers cowered 
low, as scared as anything, young Bob and 
Bet and Gnif, the gnome, just tied them up 
with string. They lashed each robber to a 
pole and stood them in a row ; the muddy tear 
tracks down their cheeks made them a sorry 
show. 



Jxexormccl 
CHAPTER, "St. 






How IVORY SOAP cleans 
Will be the thrilling text 

Of an adventurous chapter which 
Will be the very next. 



With brushes, mops, and IVORY SOAP, 
and sudsy, scratchy scrubs, our heroes 
cleansed those robber men with energetic 
rubs. And, when at last the robbers blinked 
the soap-suds from their eyes, they gazed 
upon our heroes bold with looks of glad sur- 
prise. For dirt is next to naughtiness and 
casts an evil spell, but now these men were 
spotless-clean, their hearts were changed as 
well. Meanwhile the joyous children had 
been throwing IVORY cakes into the pool— 
(you know the suds that IVORY always 
makes). This soap had made the water 
clean, and every dress and tie was spotless 
white, so Betty hung the clean things up to 
dry. Then spake a former robber man, (but 
now quite brave and true) : 

"Kind friends, you've done a noble deed 
but you have more to do. We are but humble 
henchmen of a Baron, black and bold; he 
lives in yonder castle that is very grim and 
old. He is a cruel master and he's mussy, 
fierce and grim, so you must take your 
IVORY SOAP and also conquer him." 
"We're off!" cried Gnif. "No rest for us 
while underneath the sun there still remains 
a cleansing task that should be finely done.". 



ussy lords 



IVORY 

IT FLOATS 



SOAP 

99 PURE 



Reprinted 
By Permission 

of 

[JOHN MARTIN'S] 
BOOK 
THE CHILD'S 
MAGAZINE 

© 




Let me tell you more 
about my Baby Book 

My volunteer, clinic work and 
my correspondence with thou- 
sands of mothers have taught • 
me to know, most of the prob- 
lems which distress those who 
are entering ■ the blessed .but 
trying state of motherhood. 

Of course, lots of things you 
leave to the doctor, and you 
should, but unfortunately most 
doctors have never been moth- 
ers and cannot always compre- 
hend a mother's view-point. 

What I have tried to pro- 
duce is a text book for mothers, 
written by a mother. It tells 
how to prepare for mother- 
hood and seeks to guide you 
through those first scary weeks 
when Baby seems more like a 
miracle than a human being. It 
tells about food, clothing, bath, 
first aids, nursery furnishings and 
hundreds of other such things. 

I am sure you 
will find it helpful, 
and doctors and 
nurses who have 
read it assure me 
that everything in 
the book is in accord 
with sound, modern 
practice. It is fully 
indexed for con- 
stant reference. 

My book is pub- 
lished by The Men- 
nen Company, for 
which I am glad, 





because I think their Borated Talcum 
and Kora-Konia have contributed 
more to babies' comfort and happi- 
ness than any other preparations I 
know about. 

Although the book is finely bound 
and illustrated and would ordinarily 
sell for at least a dollar, The Mennen 
Company will mail a limited number 
for 25 cents. I hope every mother in 
the United States gets a copy — and 
consults it every day. 

Lovingly, 

Belle. 

n^wARK. N.J. u.s.d. 

THE MENNEN COMPANY, LIMITED / 
Montreal, Quebec / 
/ 

What nurses think.— (^j sn 6 " 21 

"A wonderful aid to any *""*•* / 
mother." / 

/ THE MENNEN 

" Every copy should mean S COMPANY 
a better baby." / Newark, N. J. 

/ I enclose 25c for a copy of 
"Reduces baby ' Aunt Belle's Baby Book. 

culture to a , 
science." ' 
/ 

/ 

* Name 



U Address. 





BAR CIRCLE 



A summer shower and then the sunshine on a 
wet, slippery pavement. 

Vacuum Cup Autobilt Bicycle Tires on your 
wheel and then safety no matter how 
treacherous the going. 

Automobile tires scaled down to bicycle size, with 
the same reputation for long service, fine 
looks, and trouble-free performance enjoyed 
by the Vacuum Cup Tires on your dad's car. 

Let your dealer show you this season's Penn- 
sylvania line. See the four handsome treads 
and inspect the quality. The prices are 
what you expect to pay for what you 
ought to have. 

Pennsylvania Rubber Company of America, Inc. 
JEANNETTE, PA. 

Direct Factory Branches and Service Agencies 
Throughout the United States and Canada 
Export Department, Woolworth Building, New York City 



Ride a Bicycle 





I'm 

"COM£ c^VD GET IT" 

On an outing nothing goes so well with breakfast, luncheon or dinner as 

Baker's Cocoa 

It is. very nutritious, has a delicious flavor and a delightful aroma 
5<| that appeals mightily to the healthy appetites engendered 

^Wft ° Pen SpaCCS ' ^ a ' r and exercise - h satisfies 

Jfpf** and sustains. 

®e we fW getf genwme with the 
trade-mark on the package. Made only by 

WALTER BAKER & CO. LTD. 




Established 1780. 



DORCHESTER, MASS. 



REG. U.S. PAT. OFF. 

BOOKLET OF CHOICE RECIPES SENT FREE ON REQUEST 




Like the needed run 
in the ninth — 

Vitalics come through a winner every time! 




'\Z"OU bet you can depend upon sturdy Vitalics 
I to come through all the time — no matter how 
hard you use them. 

'They're a money-saving tire, too. Even though 
they cost only a little more than a cheap tire, 
they save you a nice $1.50 or more on each tire 
you buy for the reason that a Vitalic lasts more 
than twice as long as two ordinary tires." 



The extra strong, wear-resisting, pure rubber on the 
outside, and the tough, closely woven fabric on the 
inside, combine to protect Vitalics from trouble. 
The fabric used is 1 43^-ounce motorcycle fabric — 
the strongest fabric used in most other bicycle tires 
is only 1 2 -ounce — usually lighter ! 

Vitalics are the standard by which all other bicycle 
tires are judged. Of course, they are guaranteed. 

CONTINENTAL RUBBER WORKS 

Erie, Pa. 



VITALIC 

TRADE MARX REC'STCREID ^^^^^^^ 

Bicycle Tires 

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 




TRADE MARK 

Tougher than 
elephant hide" 



:««<<<.•<< 



i 



Cornelia Meigs 806 



(The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the 6 eneral copyright, and articles must not be reprinted without special permission.) 

CONTENTS OF ST. NICHOLAS FOR JULY, 1921 

Frontispiece: "They had reached America at last !" Drawn by Henry C Pitz 

The Airplane Patrol. Sketch. Illustrations from photographs Lyman E. Stoddard 771 

Penelope's Ship. Ballad v . _ „ "t 

Illustrated by W. M. Berger Florence Boyce Davis 776 

John O' Birds. Sketch. Illustration from photograph Mabe l Ansl Murphy 780 

Squirrel-Folk. Sketch „ . „ ... _ na . 

Illustrated by George A. King arid from photographs SC ° V,Ue ' Jr 782 
Nerve in the Pinch. Sketch. Illustrations from photographs William T. Tilden, 2nd 788 

The Mightiest Eagle. Story T „ . . " ' * 

Illustrated by Phillips Ward J - H ° raCe Lyt,e 792 

Kit, Pat, and a Few Boys. Serial Story Beth B Gilchrlaf 7Q0 

Illustrated by C. M. Relyea • Gllchrlst "99 

The Black Sheep's Coat. Story 

Illustrated by Henry C. Pitz 

A Goodly Heritage. Verse MiIdred Wasson ' 815 

Boy Hunters in Demerara. Serial Story. Conclusion George Inness Hartiev 81 f. 

Illustrated by J. Clinton Shepherd oeorge inness Hartley 81b 

The Knights of the Wild-Fire. Story M ^ ^ „ ■ 

Illustrated by A. Henderson Y MaFy C °" sta "« Du Bois ... 822 

A Glimpse at Our Country's Heirlooms. Sketch. Illustrated Wilbur Gass 827 

On Freedom. Verse v . . ... .,',„' ~ 

Virginia Woods Mackall .... 828 

The Luck of Denewood. Serial Story ( Alden Arthur Knipe / e™ 

Illustrated by Emilie Benson Knipe j Emilie Benson Rmpe J 

Why Not Paper Houses ? Sketch. Illustrations from photographs Charles K. Taylor 837 

Camp Roosevelt. Sketch. Illustrations from photographs Lillian Evertsen 840 

The Watch Tower. A Review of Current Events. Illustrated Edward N. Teall 842 

Nature and Science for Young Folk. Illustrated 847 

Electric Power "Banks" (A. Russell Bond)— Fair-weather Sig- 
nals (Dorothy Arno Baldwin) — The Wireless Preacher — The Con- 
stellations for July (Isabel M. Lewis)— A Bumblebee in a Spider's 
Cave (R. Bruce Horsfall, Jr.) 

For Very Little Folk: 

The Tiptoe Twins at the Circus. Pictures. 

Drawn by Isabel Morton Fish 8 g 2 

The St. Nicholas League. With awards of Prizes for Stories, 

Poems, Drawings, Photographs, and Puzzles. Illustrated 854 

The Letter-Box ,~ 

_ 00Z 

The Riddle-Box ' 

000 

St. Nicholas Stamp Page. Conducted by Samuel R. Simmons Advertising Pages 

Th h n, ?i entU 7n°' ?1 d its ' ditc ?* re f e "! e manuscripts and art material, submitted for publication, only on the understanding. 
shouTdbe "7byt Zt r s eSP ° nSMe f ° r ' 0SS ° T '"^ theret ° WkUe in tkdr P ° SSeSsion ° r in »™ k Copies of manTcHpls 

In the United States, the price of St. Nicholas Magazine is S4.00 a year in advance, or 35 cents a single codv the oricp 
of a yearly subscription to a Canadian address is $4.35; the subscription price elsewhere throughout the world U iJ 60 Uht 
^ g h lf-n^ IC - e % S4 -° h ° P ' US thC f ° f re ' gn P ° Stage ' 60 Cents) - Foreign subscriptions will be received in English^oney at 1 pound 
4 shillings; in French money, 75 francs, covering postage. We request that remittances be by money-order bank check draft 
or registered letter. _ The Century Co. reserves the right to suspend any subscription taken contrary to its sellmc terms T ami 
to refund the unexpired credit. PUBLISHED MONTHLY. ' s sellm S terms, and 

The half-yearly parts of ST. NICHOLAS end with the October and April numbers respectively and the red cloth covers 
are ready with the issue of these numbers; price Ji.oo by mail, postpaid; the two covers for the complete volume Ja oc 
bma and furnish covers for $2.00 per part, or S4.00 for the complete volume. (Carriage extra.) In sending the'numbers to 
us, they should be distinctly marked with owner's name. Bound volumes are not exchanged for numbers "Umbers to 

All subscriptions for, and all business matters in connection with, ST. Nicholas Magazine should be addressed to 

THE CENTURY CO. 
Publication and Circulation Office, Concord, N. H. 
Editorial and Advertising Offices, 353 Fourth Ave., New York, N. Y. 

DON °M G PA N r!fr ST 9 ER ', P "" d "" GEORGE L. WHEELOCK, Treasurer 

DON M. PARKER, Secretary JAMES ABBOTT, Ass't Treasurer 

Board of Trustees 

VOL. XLVIII. GEORGE H. HAZEN, Chairman No 9 

GEORGE INNESS, JR. W . MORGAN SHUSTER / 

(Copyright, 1921, by The Century Co.) (Title Registered U S Pat Off ) 

(Entered as Second Class Matter September 4, 1920, at the United States Post Office, Concord, N. H., under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. Entered at the Post Office Department, Ottawa, Canada ) 




'We are advertised by our loving friends' 




A typical 

Mellin's Food 

Baby 




Mellin's Food, properly prepared, 
furnishes every element a baby needs 
to grow and develop as Nature intends. 



Send today for a Free Trial Bottle of Mellin's Food. 
Mellin's Food Company, Boston, Mass. 



8 



>3 



1 



ST. NICHOLAS 

NEXT MONTH AND TO COME 



Phantom Gold KENNETH PAYSON KEMPTON 

The story of a young English sailor-lad, adrift in the port of Boston. 
He is signed by the skipper of a mysterious craft, and puts out to sea 
on a mission both foolhardy and daring. This serial begins in August 

Ml T? S S1X m T hs - l } > a fas cinating piece of writing, and 
you 11 wish for more and more of it from month to month. 

The Unromantic Sea-Chest 

DOROTHEA CASTELHUN 

And while we all put out to sea in the quest of "Phantom Gold " we 
might just as well pause to discover what is inside this box The con- 
tents do not look alluring, but we find they hide a happy secret, and the 
solution of a perplexing problem. 

The Haunted Swamp T. MORRIS LONGSTRETH 

Mr. Longstreth and E L transport a succulent millionaire from his 
mahogany shell to Wildyne, amid trials and tribulations, but finally 
deposit him in Prunier s care, little the worse for wear. 

A Black Leopard of Sumatra WARREN H. MILLER 

The whim of a sultan demands a black leopard. George Sloan his 
father, and a native prince, start out for one, and finallv succeed in 
their quest. A high-powered jungle story! 



The Conquest of the Reaper MARY R. PARKMAN 

^ , if „ t 7 he 1J v , ast gfaln-fields of the West were harvested by 
sickles ? Would bread be as cheap as it is to-day? The " staff of life ' 
would be a weak reed for the human race of to-day to lean upon if it 
had not been for the invention of the reaper. 

Cheating the River CHARLES A. HOYT 

Fred Bowers' original idea, scoffed at by some of the foremen turns a 
notable engineering trick and saves a great construction project. 

On the Yang-Tse-Kiang BERTON braley 

Two pages of delightfully amusing verse, illustrated by Harold Sichel 
The humor element in this number will include also one page of fun from 
Oliver Herford's pen and brush, a bit of inspiriting nonsense-verse by 
Ralph Henry Barbour, and a timely "briny ballad," written and illus- 
trated by Charles F. Lester. 



YS 



*rar<raiiiiiiiiiE^^^ 




In Will Rogers' footsteps 

WHEN you boys are putting on a Wild 
West Show, doing "stunts" with the rope, 
you dont need our clothes; cowboy and Indian 
outfits are better 

But for other occasions you'll want these clothes 
of ours; you'll appreciate the smart style You 
parents will like the saving; the clothes are made 
so well that they last longer than others 



Hart Schaffner <Sl Marx 

Hoys' clothes as good as father's 



SINCE GRANDFATHER TOOK UP GOLF- 




All the family's playing the grand old Scotch game. It's a regular 
epidemic, and the doctors are helpless — it has them too. 

Quite naturally all the family talks golf and reads golf; its a part 
of the game. And equally as naturally they read 

THE AMERICAN GOLFER, THE SPORT PICTORIAL 

America's leading publication on sports. For besides golf it covers 
tennis, trapshooting, rowing and other outdoor sports. 

Also it carries in each and every issue a competent and interesting 
article of instruction on how to improve your game. 

Are you a subscriber to this live, up-to-date magazine, edited by 
Grantland Rice, the leading sport writer of the country? If not, 
why not get in line today? 

The coupon below makes it easy to subscribe. 



i — 



CENTURION PUBLISHERS, Inc 
353 Fourth Avenue 



GOTir American 
olfer 

New York, N. Y. 



. 1921 

Dear Sirs: Please enter my subscription for one year to THE 
AMERICAN GOLFER, THE SPORT PICTORIAL (bi-weekly) 
for which I agree to pay $5.00 (Five Dollars). 

Name 

Street 

Town State 

NOTE— The subscription rate for Canada is $5.50; Foreign countries $6.00. 




For Girls (under 20 years), Roxbury, Vermont 



A 300 acre wonderland in the heart of the Green Mountains. 
Athletic fields, private swimming pond, clay tennis courts, 
screened dining porch, sleeping bungalows, and a big assembly 
hall for plays, dances, music, and games around a big cheery 
fireplace. Famous for its fine saddle horses, free horseback 
riding, instruction, and wonderful camping trips. Separate camps 
for Juniors and Seniors. Enthusiastic counselors carefully 
chosen. Write now for illustrated booklet. 

Mr. & Mrs. C. A. Roys, 10 Bowdoin St., Cambridge, Mass. 



CAMP WAMPANOAG 

13th Season CAPE COD, BUZZARDS BAY 

A salt water camp for boys from 8 to 15. Scouting over old Indian 
trails. Land and water sports, prizes. Athletics under experienced 
college men. Military training. Camp mother. Booklet. 

Mr. Aldrich Taylor, Mrs. Bertrand E. Taylor, Directors. 

240 Grant Avenue, Newton Center, Mass. 




Massachusetts, Ashland. 
BOB-WHITE For boys under 15. Seventh 
season. Horseback riding thru 
woodland trails, tennis tournaments, athletic fields, camp- 
ing trips, boating, etc. Illlustrated booklet. 

R. C. Hill. S. B. Hayes. 



Connecticut, Bantam Lake. 

CAMP WONPOSET 

A camp for young boyB in the Berkshires, 100 miles from New 
York City. Everything a boy can wish for. $25,000 equipment. 
Write for camp book. 

ROBERT TIND ALE, 31 East 71st St., New York City. 



New Hampshire, Stinson Lake- 

EAGLE POINT 

Mountain camp in heart of White Mountains. Fully equipped for all 
camp activities. Trained leaders. A beautiful and profitable place for 
your daughter. Virginia E. Spencer, Ph.D., Secretary, 220 West 42nd 
Street, New York City. 



GIRLS! 

You can win from two to six weeks at 

Camp Jflacbonougf) 

where we are having a wonderful time. Write for 
particulars. 

Miss Mabel Lawrence Evans Vergennes, Vt. 



ASH-NO-CA 

"A BOYS' CLUB" 

IN THE MOUNTAINS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Not aschool, not a camp, but a place planned, equipped, 
and conducted for the pleasure and physical and moral 
welfare of boys under seventeen during the summer. 
Delightful climate. No mosquitoes. Sports include hik- 
ing, mountain climbing, camping, canoeing, swimming, 
boating, tennis, baseball, track, golf, EVERYTHING 
A BOY LIKES. Fine buildings furnish healthful 
sleeping accommodations and other buildings ample 
place for recreation in wet weather. Boys have best 
possible care. Large farm furnishes abundance of 
wholesome food. 714 acre tract. 

Address George Jackson, Asheville School - Asheville, N.C. 



SOUTH SEA CAMP 

BABYLON, NEW YORK 

Refined home camp for girls frcm four to sixteen, overlooking the great 
South Bay. All outdoor games; swimming, tennis, horseback riding. 
Individual care and attention. For particulars address 

MRS. MARY M. HADDEN, Director 
BABYLON NEW YORK 



Long Island, Bellport. 

CAMP GRANGE 

Under the direction of experienced Directress and Counselors. Limited 
to fifty girls, 5-14 years. Fifty acres. All sports, ocean and still water 
bathing. For catalogue address Miss C. B. Hagedorn, 606 West 
137th Street, New York City. 



Wetomachek Camps for Girls 

Powers Lake, Wisconsin 




Under the management of The Chicago 
Normal School of Physical Education 

Junior and Senior Camps. July and August. 
For girls, ages 9 to 22. A strong force of 
trained counselors. References required. 
Write for Booklet 

Registrar, Box 18, 5026 Greenwood Ave., Chicago, 111. 




DEMOCRACY 

* in Private Schools 



/^VFTEN there is some voice raised against 
V>/ boarding or private schools that cries, 
"Snobbery " ! Fortunately this unfair impu- 
tation, which is so very unjust, is heard less 
and less, as the aim and ideals of private schools are better understood. 

Public schools have accomplished a difficult task in a superlatively splendid 
way. Our public schools are the foundations of our national civilization. 

But, in the meantime, what of the democracy that comes from the private 
institutions, where those more blessed financially than some others may attend? 
Throughout the United States there are such places that lift their heads high. 
It is here that the children of practically the same financial background go. 
Immediately is removed the chance of "my family is better than yours, because 
we are richer." There is no favoritism shown, no privilege granted to one 
more than to another. 

Where young folks meet on the same ground of equality, there is bound to 
be the stimulating competition in which real merit wins, wherein class distinc- 
tions do not exist, and where the individual is judged by what he produces. 
In private schools the earth and air are the same for each student, and the results 
of training depend solely on the individual. 

Friendly rivalry is the tonic that brings - 
out the best in us all. But where there are 
inequal advantages at the start, friendly 
rivalry becomes something which works not 
for the best. 

Then dissatisfaction, disappointment, and 
unhappiness may arise, as one sees some other 
getting ahead not necessarily because of merit. 

We believe in private schools because of 
this "equality start," this development and 
success of the individual through merit, this 
standard of endeavor whereby the student 
progresses because of what is in himself, 
this maintenance of the basic principles of 
democracy. 





BEACON 

A Country-City Boarding and Day School 

For Boys and Girls of All Ages 

Distinctly college preparatory, covering all gradeB 
from kindergarten to college. Special diploma 
courses for students not wishing to enter college. 
Household Arts, Music, Art, Secretarial and Busi- 
ness Courses. Faculty of experienced college gradu- 
ates. 3-acre estate with 5 buildings in Boston's 
most beautiful suburb. 85 ncres and 5 buildings in 
the Blue Hill region. 15 miles from Boston. Hills- 
view, the school's summer camp, is used for week 
end sports and games. For catalog address 

MRS. ALTHEA H. ANDREW, Principal 
1440 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 




WM 




Stamford Military 
Academy 

A preparatory school that pursues sound educational 
methods and provides a thorough training for mind and 
body. Located at Ossining overlooking the Hudson, con- 
venient to New York, the situation is ideal. 

Every power is bent toward the complete development 
of each student. Classes are purposely small and boys are 
assured individual consideration from every teacher. In- 
structors are chosen for their moral force as well as for 
their skill. 

The locality permits every kind of outdoor sport and the 
gymnasium is well equipped for all indoor exercise. Summer 
Camp. For catalog address 

WALTER D. GERKEN, A.M., Principal 
Ossining, New York 





Los Alamos Ranch School 

Combines school work under the best masters ob- 
tainable with wonderful outdoor life, carefully 
supervised, on a big Western Ranch in the pine 
covered mountains of New Mexico. The most 
healthful climate in America. An ideal School and 
in Summer a most wonderful Camp. Write for book- 
let, state which is wanted School or Camp. Address 

A. J- Connell, Director. 
LOS ALAMOS RANCH SCHOOL, 
Buckman, Santa Fe County, New Mexico. 



££>cf)00te for Pops ano (girls— Conttnueb 




Southf ield Point Hall 

A School for Girls. Beautifully situated on Long Island Sound at 
Southfield Point. Intermediate, general, and college preparatory 
courses. Music, gymnastics, athletics, andsports. Horseback riding, 
skating, skiing, 52 minutes from Grand Central Station, New York. 
Limited enrollment. 

JESSIE CALLAM GRAY, B. A., Principal 
BERNICE TOWNSEND PORTER, Assistant Principal 
10 Davenport Drive, Stamford, Conn. 



NajionalParkSeminary 

for Young Women, Washington, D. C. Suburbs 
JAMES E. AMENT, Ph.D., LL.D., President 
Presents the fundamentals of a college education in a two- 
year diploma course. Music, Art, Expression, Domestic Sci- 
ence and other vocational courses. Athletics, Gymnasium, 
swimming pool, outdoor 6ports, riding. 18 minutes from 
"Washington, D.C. Thirty-two buildings on an eighty-five acre 
campus make a home where cultured environment, healthy 
surroundings, and democratic ideals mould the well-bred girl 
of today into the comprehensive woman of tomorrow. An 
early enrollment is urged. Catalogue. Address 

Registrar, Box 165, Forest Glen, Maryland 




Rhode Island, Providence. 

THE' MARY C. WHEELER SCHOOL 

A Town and Country School for Girls 

College preparatory and General Course. Advanced studio classes. 
Music. Secretarial course. Farm home for girls 10 to 14 years. 



Massachusetts, Berkshire. 

CREST ALBAN \ ach ?° l /« ™ e 1 & h in the invigorating 
climate ot the Berkshires. Thirty minutes 
from Pittsfield. 200 acres, 3 buildings. Number limited. Special care 
given to home training, character development, and health. Open air 
classes. Outdoor sports. Miss Margery Whiting, Principal, Berk- 
shire, Mass. 



Woodland Park 

Junior Department of Lasell Seminary 

For Girls under 15 

A course of study covering all gram- 
mar grades, fitting girls for Lasell 
Seminary and other secondary schools. 
Buildings splendidly equipped for the 
needs and comforts of young people. 
Glass-enclosed sun-parlors and class- 
rooms. Gymnasium and swimming 
pool. Playgrounds for all activities. 
Catalog on application. 

Camp Teconnet opens July 1st. 
GUY M. WINSLOW, Ph.D., 
Principal 
CHAS. F. TOWNE, A.M. , 
Assoc. Principal 
Woodland Road 
Auburndale Massachusetts 





The Mitchell Military Boys School 

A school that appeals to the young American boy and the dis- 
criminating parent. Exponents of clean sport, fair play, and 
thorough work. Development and maintenance of health con- 
sidered of first importance. Military training adapted to the 
age of our boys. Preparatory to larger secondary schools. 
Equipment modern and complete. 100 acres. 

ALEXANDER H. MITCHELL, Principal, Box S, Billerica, Mass. 




A Delightful 

home school which carries the 
girl through from kindergar- 
ten to high school. On a 
large estate one hour's ride 
from New York. The students 
range from 4 to 16 years ; 
the number owing to the 
emphasis on individual in- 
struction and personal care, 
is limited to 25. 

MARY M. HADDEN, Director 
Babylon, N. Y. 

t^fehore Acres 

»west Islip 

cSg?%Sr School 



JUNIOR BRADFORD 

A Preparatory School for Bradford Academy 

Offers a course of supervised, correlated 
studies from the sixth grade through 
the first year of high school; with the 
use of the Bradford campus and swim- 
ming pool for athletics. 

Further information will be 
sent upon request. Address 

The Principal of the Junior Academy 

139 Main Street, Bradford, Mass. 



EASTF0RD # 

For the development of manly boys into good citizens 
— leaders of men, by a rational system of training mind, 
morals and body. Work, self-responsibility, a clean, 
healthy body and a vigorous, well-balanced mind be- 
long to Eastford boys. College preparation or voca- 
tional training. Catalogue. 

Stanley Kelley, Director, Pomfret, Conn. 



g>cf)oolsi for iiops; anb (girta— Conttnueb 




TENACRE 



,4 Country School for Young Girls 
from Ten to Fourteen Years of Age 

PREPARATORY to Dana Hall. 
Fourteen miles from Boston. All 
sports and athletics supervised and 
adapted to the age of the pupil. The 
finest instruction, care and influence. 

Miss Helen Temple Cooke 

Dana Hall, Wellesley, Mass. 



FOR GIRLS 



We offer, with diploma, Academic, College 
Preparatory, Art, Music, Dramatic Secretarial 
and Home-making Courses, including Horti- 
culture. 

Students may enter regular courses or with 
parents' approval, may specialize as desired^ In 
beautiful Westchester, 30 miles from New York. 
53rd year. Write for Year Book. Address 
Ossining-on-Hudson, New York. Box 7N. 

CLARA C. FULLER, Principal 



Pennsylvania, Lancaster. 

Franklin and Marshall Academy 

Prepares boys for all Colleges and Technical Schools. Complete modern 
Equipment and good Physical Training Department. Old established 
School on basis allowing moderate terms. Catalogue on request. 

Address E. M. Hartman, Principal, Box 432, Lancaster, Pa. 



New York, Cazenovia. 

THE CAZENOVIA SEMINARY 

Co-educational. A College Preparatory and Finishing School 
of the highest type. Founded 1824. Endowed. All Athletics. 

Separate cottages and supervision for junior boys and girls 
ten years of age and upwards. A wonderful climate for health. 
A wonderful country for outdoor sports. Trained nurse. 

Charles E. Hamilton, D.D., President. 



The Hedges 

NORTON, MASS. 

The Junior School of House in the Pines. 30 miles from 
Boston. For girls under fourteen. A large modern home. 
Sun parlors for class rooms. Play fields. Horseback riding. 
Swimming. A wholesome, simple life of study and play that 
makes the child quick to feel, anxious to know, able to do. 
MISS GERTRUDE E. CORNISH, Principal 



lobe 




Miss Mason's Summer School 

This well-known school is offering exceptional courses for summer 
work The ideal location affords a splendid opportunity for recrea- 
tion and study. Beautiful and historical Tarrytown is a wonderful 
place for a summer vacation. On the Hudson river, 45 minutes 
from Fifth Avenue. Fine courses in Secretarial work, Business 
Methods for Women, Music, Art, Dancing and Authorship. Em- 
phasis placed on tutoring for college entrance. Catalogue for 
summer ot regular winter school sent on request. 

Address Box 725 
For Girls and Women Tarrytown-on-Hudson, N. Y. 



TjlvefC 



Military 

ACADEMTi 



To Culver come the sons of men 
who do the virile things in the 
country and in their commun- 
ities. They are the men who 
measure a training for a boy 
not by its promises but by its 
results. 

More to them than Culver's 
beautiful setting, more than its 
amazingly complete equipment 
is the fact that Culver demands 
of the boy the best there is in 
a boy and gets it. 



For catalogue, address 
The President's Aide 
Culver, Indiana I 





Schools; for Pops! and (girls— Conttnueo 




The Ely School for Girls 

ELY COURT 
GREENWICH CONNECTICUT 

In the country, one hour from 
New York City. Twenty-five 
acres, modern equipment. Col- 
lege Preparatory, General, Sec- 
retarial and Post-Graduate 
Courses. Music. Household arts. 
Daily work in the studio. Horse- 
back riding and all summer and 
winter sports. Sleeping Porch. 



New Jersey, Orange. 

MISS BEARD'S SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

A country school, 13 miles from New York. College preparatory, special 
courses. Music, Art, Domestic Arts and Science. Supervised physical 
work in gymnasium and field. Catalog on request. 

Address Miss Lucie C. Beard. 



Connecticut, Stamford. 

MASSEE COUNTRY SCHOOL 0n L ? ng i, sland 

hound. Prepa- 
ration for college and scientific school. Junior Department for boys over 7. 
One teacher to 12 boys. Attractive buildings. Beautiful 15-acre campus. 
AH sports. W. W. Massee, Ph.D., Box 500, Stamford, Conn. 



PARENTS 



Let son and daughter help select 
the schools to be attended. Often 
times their likes and dislikes are 
well founded, and though the final 
choice rests with you, the atten- 
tion you give to the opinions of 
your boy or girl in this important 
matter will not come amiss. 



Miss Hall's 

SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

In the Berkshire Hills, on 
the Holmes Road to Lenox. 
Forty-five acres. One thou- 
sand feet above the sea level. 

Miss MIRA H. HALL, Principal 
Pittsfield, Massachusetts 



PowderPohtt School 

Will Understand Your Boy 

—and help him to understand himself. Thorou 
Btruction. Clean, snappy athletics for 
every boy. Clearest understanding be- 
tween boys and masters. Prepares for 
college and giveB strong gen- 
eral course. Ages 10 to 19. 
Number limited to sixty. 
Boys must furnish evidence 
of good character. Unique 
location on seashore. Con- 
venient to Boston. Address 

RALPH K. BEARCE, A.M. 
Headmaster 
27 King Caesar Road 
Duxbury, Mass. 





Massachusetts, South Byfield. 

DUMMER ACADEMY 

A preparatory school for a limited number of selected boys. Ideal 
country location. Moderate fees. International reputation. 159th year 
opens September 20. 



PEDDIE 

Every Peddie boy is a leader in 
work and play. He learns well be- 
cause expert teachers make the work 
interesting. He enjoys athletics be- 
cause of good coaching and a chance 
for every boy to make a team. Peddie 
men are leaders in scholarship and 
student activities in 26 colleges. 

Splendid gymnasium, swimming 
pool. 60-acre campus. College prep- 
aration. 56th year. Lower school for 
boys under 14. Summer session July 
11 to Sept. 2. For booklets address 

ROGER W. SWETLAND, LL.D. 
Headmastei 

Box 7 M Hightstown, N. J. 



An Endowed 
School for Boys 




Whiting 
Hall 



A Country Home School for Girls 

from eight to sixteen, affiliated with the best preparatory schools Twenty- 
six acres, new buildings, ideal location, high elevation — halfway between 
Boston and Worcester, near Longfellow's Wayside Inn. Outdoor sleeping 
and class rooms, if desired. Individual care. Teachers for all branches. 
Mistress of field games. House mother. Family life emphasized. 
MR. ELBRIDGE C. WHITING, Amherst, Yale, MRS. WHITING, Wellesley, Prins. 
12 CONCORD ROAD, SOUTH SUDBURY, MASS. 



i£>ct)oote for Pops! ano <§trte— Contmueb 




HILLSIDE 

Norwalk, Connecticut 

College preparatory and special courses. Normal liv- 
ing in right environment. Every comfort. All health- 
ful activities. Gymnasium. Catalog. 

M»S" el R- Brendlinger A.B Vassar j p . . , 
Vida Hunt Francis, A.B. Smith ) ' 



SCHOOL FOR 
GIRLS 





Allen Military School 

A country, college preparatory school, 9 miles from Boston. 
The group system prevails. Gymnasium, swimming pool, con- 
crete rink, and three athletic fields. Upper and Lower Schools. 

THOMAS CHALMERS, A.B., D.D., Director 
Portsmouth Military School Under Same Management 
437 WALTHAM ST., WEST NEWTON, MASS. 



Connecticut, Cornwall. 

RUMSEY HALL 

A School for Boys under 15. Yearly rate $1200. 

L. R. Sanford, Principal. 

Loins H. Schutte, M.A., Headmaster. 



Massachusetts, West Bridgewater. 

Howard Seminary for Girls ^« 

and general courses. Household arts and Home management. Strong 
courses in instrumental and vocal music. Military drill. Horseback 
riding. All sports. Upper and lower school. 50 pupils. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. P. Kendall, Principals, 

28 Howard Street, West Bridgewater, Mass. 




PAGE 

MILITARY ACADEMY 

A Big School for Little Boys 

Military life appeals to youngsters — 
at Page it is combined with work and 
play that develops initiative and self- 
reliance. The growing mind is guided 
by wise men and women who thoroughly 
understand boys. E\ ery advantage of 
climate and location. Large modern 
buildings; seven-acre campus. Let our 
catalog tell you all about us. Boys 
grow big and strong in California. 

ROBERT A. GIBBS, Headmaster 

Route 7, Box 947 
LOS ANGELES CALIFORNIA 



FARMINGTON 



MAINE 



Abbott School 

"The boy at Abbott lives" 

Athletics on a field that would be a credit to 
any college. Hiking, camping, snowshoeing, 
skiing. 

Small classes insure rapid and thorough work. 
Prepares for business but emphasizes college 
preparation. 

Modern methods with old-fashioned thor- 
oughness. 

Fall term opens September 28th. 

Catalog on request. 
MOSES BRADSTREET PERKINS, Headmaster 



Illinois, Woodstock. (1 hour from Chicago) 

Todd Seminary for Boys 1000 fe ^ t | bo y v e e ar ! he sea " 

Exclusively for younger boys (7 to 16). Right thinking developed 
through comradeship between teachers and boys. Vigilant watchful- 
ness of personal habits. 

Summer Camp, Onekama, Mich. Noble Hill, Principal. 



Wlndamiieb 



r "STAMMERING 



its (ause aj\d Gire 



99 



Tou can be quickly cured if you stammer. Send 10 cents, coin 
or stamps, for 288 page cloth bound book on Stammering and 
Stuttering. It tells how I cured myself after Stammering and 
Stuttering for 20 years. BENJAMIN N. EOGUE 
I 480 Boflue Building, 1147 N. III. St. Indianapolis) 




Se^en Qables 

Cltie JUNIOR SCHOOL of^ 

- the MARY LYON £CHOOL - 

Seven Gables is for little girls. It gives the same 
educational advantages as The Mary Lyon School offers 
to older sisters. In country surroundings where girls can 
enjoy healthful, outdoor play and study. Constant mother 
love and guidance. Cozy rooms to live and play in and 
glass enclosed class rooms combine to make a wonderful 
home for girls 6-14. Separate catalogues for Seven 
Gables and The Mary Lyon School. 

Mr. AND Mrs. H. M. Crist, Principals 
Box 1542 Swarthmore, Pa. 





By the author of "White Shadows in the South Seas" 



MYSTIC ISLES OF 
THE SOUTH SEAS 




By 

FREDERICK O'BRIEN 



O 



NCE more the author has captured 
between book covers the witchery 
of the far South Sea Islands. It 
will take its place by the side of 
the most sensational travel book success of the 
past ten years — Mr. O'Brien's extraordinary 
"White Shadows in the South Seas." 

"Mystic Isles of the South Seas" is a book 
of that happiness for which we humans long; 
a simple, effortless, sun-warmed existence with 
time to dream, time to live, to sleep, to think, 
to feel — even time to play ; of soft airs, waving 
palms, a surge of wide waters reaching off to 
infinity and smashing blue thunder into 
dazzling white against a coral reef inside of 
which is peace. In it are gentle, wonderful 
playmates, men and women — the women as 
frankly friendly as the men, and not one of 
either who "dare not stick a rose behind the 
ear." It tells of the place where "Rui," or 
Robert Louis Stevenson, lived in the house of Ori-a-Ori, and the fine dignified sav- 
age himself with whom the beloved writer changed names as a brother-pledge. 




The facts of old monuments, language and legends have sympathetic light 
thrown on them; and the story of the scourge of the whites upon this happy 
life is passionately told. 

How shall one choose what to tell of such a book? The farcial beginnings of 
syndicalism in a wildly funny and completely abortive I. W. W. fish "strike"? 
The philosopher who lived in a hencoop? The most truthful sea stories of 
Lying Bill and his virtuous circle? The godless, merry Coney Island-Paris 
life of Papeete with its human tragedies? 

It is impossible to choose. This is a book 

of marvels loved, craved, avidly desired by 
something deep within our human nature. It 
must be as universal in its appeal as are these 
desires and cravings. 

Profusely illustrated from photographs. Price $5.00 



Also by the same author 

WHITE SHADOWS IN 
THE SOUTH SEAS 

THE book is an amazing record of the 
author's residence for a year among 
the beautiful, simple, friendly inhab- 
itants of the Marquesas Islands in 
the far South Seas. It is a fact-story as fasci- 
nating as a fairy tale. It is humor, adventure, 
romance, tenderness, with an undercurrent of 
poignant pathos that sometimes touches the 
reader to tears. It has remained for more than 
two years one of the two or three most popular 
non-fiction books in all sections of the country. 

Not to have read "White Shadows in the South Seas" is to have missed 
of the most refreshing and most thrilling sensations of the past ten years. 

Profusely illustrated from photographs. Price $5.00 




one 



At All Bookstores T 14 17 rTWTITDV C (\ 353 Fourth Avenue 

Published by inH l/Eill 1 UI\ I \,\J»